Created from 6 pictures from Giant Ledge









Trails

Besides the thirty-five 3500 foot peaks in the Catskills, there are many other smaller mountains to climb. In addition, there are hundreds of miles of trails to hike. There are also MANY other places to hike also. I have divided the Trails section into list of All Trail, the Catskills, the Shawangunks, Bear Mt/Harriman, East Hudson, West Hudson, New Jersey and Other Trails. The All Trails list includes over 400 different trails and may load slowly on your computer. The "divided" list should load more quickly.

You can view all the Trails here.

Clicking on Trails Index will bring up an index of trails. Clicking on Top of page will return you to the top of the page.

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Acra Point LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.1 mi 1100 ft GPSies

link to topo map Park at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the right. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. After a short walk, re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the trail for about 1.1 miles. This second crossing has no bridge and can be tricky at times! Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains. This walk winds its way upward through mixed hardwood and spruce forest until it meets the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail.

Turn right on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Acra Point. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. Walk off the trail on the left to get a view to the north toward Albany or wait until just after the top of Acra Point. After about .7 miles you will be at the summit of Acra Point. The best views to the south and west are from a lookout BEFORE the summit. The path is well-traveled and is easy to find. When you walk out onto the rock shelf, you are treated to a spectacular view of the three mountains and the Camel's Hump. The views down the Black Dome Valley to the west are also excellent. From here you can also see Burnt Knob and behind and to the right Windham Mountain.

Continue on the Escarpment Trail for another 1.75 miles. The trail skirts a hill nearly as high as Acra. Views to the north from the trail continue to be elusive.The trail descends but has several short ascents before it heads down to meet the Batavia Kill Trail. The Escarpment Trail continues up over Blackhead Mountain. As you descend the trail toward the Batavia Kill Trail junction it looks very much as if you MUST ascend this mountain! Turn right on the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail to return to the parking area. This trail goes on for about 1 mile and ends. Be sure to turn right and follow the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and the signs to the parking area about .6 miles away. If you turn left, you will be climbing to the col between Blackhead and Black Dome! Bridges span the widest and deepest water crossings near the end of the trail. There is also evidence of a dam and the foundations of a mill on the Batavia Kill.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Acra Point and Burnt KnobTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.2 mi 1320 ft GPSies

link to topo map Park at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the right. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. After a short walk, re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the trail for about 1.1 miles. This second crossing has no bridge and can be tricky at times! Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains. This walk winds its way upward through mixed hardwood and spruce forest until it meets the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail.

Turn right on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Acra Point. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. Walk off the trail on the left to get a view to the north toward Albany or wait until just after the top of Acra Point. After about .7 miles you will be at the summit of Acra Point. The best views to the south and west are from a lookout BEFORE the summit. The path is well-traveled and is easy to find. When you walk out onto the rock shelf, you are treated to a spectacular view of the three mountains and the Camel's Hump. The views down the Black Dome Valley to the west are also excellent. From here you can also see Burnt Knob and behind and to the right Windham Mountain.

Retrace your steps back down to the junction of the Black Dome Trail and the Escarpment Trail. Continue straight ahead toward Burnt Knob. The summit is only about .5 miles from the trail junction but it is eroded and steep in some places. During the winter the snow conditions may make it almost impossible to negotiate. The best views are on the left of the trail just BEFORE the summit. Several short spur trails lead out to viewpoints. If you continue passed the summit you will descend slightly. Just before a steeper descent on the way to Windham High Peak look ahead for a nice view of this peak. The view is better in fall and winter when there are few leaves on the trees. Turn around and retrace your path back to the trail junction. Turn right to go back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Albany County Line to Fawn LakeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.5 mi. 1550 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head north on Route 30 through Margaretville, Roxbury, Grand Gorge, North Blenheim and Middleburgh. Just over the Route 30 bridge in Middleburgh, turn right on Route 145 and follow it to the other side of town to Huntersland Road. Turn left on Huntersland Road and drive 2.7 miles and make a left on Lawton Hollow Road. After driving 3.9 miles on Lawton Hollow Road, pull over to the left side of the road where there is a shale pit and room for several cars. Just passed this spot on the right is a "Welcome to Albany County" sign. The first .5 miles of the hike is slightly downhill on Lawton Hollow Road to the intersection with Bradt Hollow Road. Walk south on Bradt Hollow Road for about .7 miles gaining about 260 feet in the process. There aren't many aqua blazes but watch for a brown and yellow sign for the Partridge Run Wildlife Management Area on the left side of the road. It has blazes that indicate a right turn onto a snowmobile trail. The trail is usually mowed but may be overgrown with grass and weeds. From this point on most of the trail follows snowmobile and Nordic ski trails and woods roads. The aqua blazes are very clear in most cases. At 2.1 miles cross High Point Road and begin walking through stands of Norway spruce and red pine. At about 2.7 miles there is a beaver pond and the trail parallels it for a short distance and then turns right shortly after that. The trail stays near the pond briefly and then turns away from it to the left. Begin an uphill walk which brings you to Bradt Hollow Road at 3.6 miles. Walk out onto the road and turn right and almost immediately left onto a gravel road. Take the next right into a snowmobile trail but watch carefully as the blazes are hidden. The snowmobile trail parallels the road for at least a quarter mile and then begins to swing east away from the road. Begin to follow an extremely straight woods road which seems to be the boundary between private and state land. Walk mostly downhill for about a mile to Beaver Road. Turn left on Beaver Road and walk downhill for about .2 miles where the trail turns right off the road at 5.1 miles. Continue downhill on a snowmobile trail that leads to Tubbs Pond which is not marked on all maps. Continue across the bridge just downstream from the dam. From the parking area, continue to walk on the access road to 5.8 miles then turn right on Fawn Lake Road. It is only about .4 miles to the end of the road at the Fawn Lake parking area. The road parallels the lake shore most of the way. The Long Path continues through the parking area to the left onto a snowmobile trail. This is the turnaround point for the hike and as always you may simply follow your route back to the car. Walking the back roads provides and interesting alternative. Retrace your route back to Tubbs Pond and back up to Beaver Road. Turn left on Beaver Road and continue passed the trail. Walk .3 miles out to Bradt Hollow Road and turn right on Bradt Hollow Road. Walk .9 miles to the intersection with Cook Hill Road. There was a small parking area here and a sign describing the wildlife management area. Follow Bradt Hollow Road to the right. The road is exceptionally straight and heads almost due north. At 9.9 miles cross High Point Road and at 10.3 miles you will be back at the point where you turned off the road onto the trail earlier in the day. It is just .7 miles back to Lawton Hollow Road. Turn left and walk the .5 miles back to the car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the modified out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Alder Lake: Around LakeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 1.7 mi. 145 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park in the parking lot and walk toward the lake passing the stonework which is all that remains of the Coykendall Mansion. Walk down the left side of the "lawn" and follow the trail around the lake. There are several places to walk out to the shore of the lake. Directly across the lake is Cradle Rock Ridge. At .8 miles the Millbrook Ridge Trail turns left. Stay on the main trail around the lake and cross the bridge that spans Alder Creek. Stay on the woods road and follow the blazes as they guide you around the lake. The trail is sited away from the lakeshore and you will see primitive campsites between you and the water. As you near the southern end of the lake you will break out into an open area. Walk to the dam and cross over to the other side. Walk up the path toward the remains of the mansion and back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)


Alder Lake: Beaver Meadow Lake LoopTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.9 mi. 770 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park in the parking lot and walk toward the lake passing the stonework which is all that remains of the Coykendall Mansion. Walk down the left side of the "lawn" and follow the trail around the lake. There are several places to walk out to the shore of the lake. Directly across the lake is Cradle Rock Ridge. At .8 miles turn left on the Millbrook Ridge Trail that continues all the way to Balsam Lake Mountain. The trail can be wet and muddy in places and there may be some blowdowns to contend with. For the next 1.5 miles the trail climbs and then levels off several times. The elevation gain is several hundred feet but the grade is never more than 12% and averages around 6%. There isn't too much to see along the way but the trail parallels Alder Creek which generates a pleasant sound on most days. Along the way there are several beaver meadows including one at the lean-to. Arrive at the lean-to at about 2.4 miles. Walking down to the beaver meadow in front of the lean-to leads to a nice view. Walk back up to the main trail and turn right. Walk another .1 miles for a view of another beaver meadow right on the trail. Turn around and head back the way you came. At 4 miles turn left on the loop trail around Alder Lake to complete the loop around the lake. Continue to follow the trail as it empties out into a small field near the dam. Walk to the dam and cross it. Walk back up to the parking area to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)


Alder Lake: Beaver Meadow Lean-to (out and back)Trails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.8 mi. 690 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park in the parking lot and walk toward the lake passing the stonework which is all that remains of the Coykendall Mansion. Walk down the left side of the "lawn" and follow the trail around the lake. There are several places to walk out to the shore of the lake. Directly across the lake is Cradle Rock Ridge. At .8 miles turn left on the Millbrook Ridge Trail that continues all the way to Balsam Lake Mountain. The trail can be wet and muddy in places and there may be some blowdowns to contend with. For the next 1.5 miles the trail climbs and then levels off several times. The elevation gain is several hundred feet but the grade is never more than 12% and averages around 6%. There isn't too much to see along the way but the trail parallels Alder Creek which generates a pleasant sound on most days. Along the way there are several beaver meadows including one at the lean-to. Arrive at the lean-to at about 2.4 miles. Walking down to the beaver meadow in front of the lean-to leads to a nice view. Walk back up to the main trail and turn left and head back the way you came. At 4 miles turn right on the loop trail around Alder Lake to retrace your route to the parking area. Continue to follow the trail as it empties out into a small field near the dam and spillway for the lake. Walk back up the hill to the parking area and your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)


Alder Lake to Big Pond (out and back)Trails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.9 mi. 1392 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park just before the gate into Alder Lake. Parking in the lot at Alder Lake will increase the length of the hike slightly but is preferable when the gate is open and the road is in good condition. Begin by walking down the road to where the trail enters the woods at the entrance to the Cross Mountain Hunting Camp. The first obstacle is crossing Alder Creek can be a little high when it rains. Start to hike along a broad woods road which is marked with red blazes. Over the next half mile gain about 300 feet climbing to the shoulder of a ridge. The trail is easy to follow but watch for the posted signs on either side of the state land. From the ridge start to descend on the same woods road to a small stream. The descent is almost a mirror image of the ascent as the trail drops about 300 feet in half a mile. As the trail approaches the stream, the trail markers indicate a slight turn to the west off the woods road and across the stream. There is very large open area just below the stream crossing which you Mayan to investigate. Cross the stream as the trail begins follow another well-defined woods road. Climb to the shoulder of another ridge gaining 200 feet over the next half mile. At 1.8 miles the trail turns to the west heading directly toward Big Pond. At 2 miles begin a .75 mile descent losing over 400 feet as the trail heads toward Big Pond. As you approach Big Pond, you will pass through a nice stand of evergreen trees and the trail makes a few turns. As the trail nears the upper perking area at Big Pond, there is a stone retaining wall on the right side of the trail. The front of the wall is only 18 inches high but one side is about 3 feet and has a pipe coming out of it. This remains a mystery. Hike out to the parking area and sign the register before turning around to start back. On the walk back notice an extensive network of stone walls in the area if you did not see them on the way out. The walls were on both sides of the trail and, in some places, the trail crossed the walls. The work it took to collect the stones and the skill needed to turn them into stone walls that have stood for so many years is truly impressive! Continue to reface your steps crossing Alder Creek and walking back on the road to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)


Alder Lake: BushwhackTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.3 mi. 2143 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park in the parking lot and walk back down the driveway/access road to a woods road that turns left up to another small parking area and then continues parallel to Cross Mountain Road for some distance. When the woods road begins to dip down to Cross Mountain Road, turn UP the hill and find your route to the top. You may find all woods roads along the way so feel free to explore. There are several different places where the ground levels and then continues up again. Eventually you will be on flatter ground near the summit where you will find some ledges. Walking along the ledges may reveal some glimpses over to Barkaboom Mountain. Walk around on the relatively flat summit and you may find a cairn that looks like it once marked property lines. When you are done on the top, turn south to head back to the parking area. Again, woods roads can be found but this area is full of prickers and the open woods roads allow them to grow more easily. The first part of the descent is gentle but then becomes very steep. Wander round to find your best route down. Watch for glimpses of Alder lake as you descend back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)


Alder Lake: Little PondTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.3 mi. 2143 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park in the parking lot and walk back down the driveway/access road and cross Alder Creek Road. Finding the red-blazed Touch-Me-Not Trail can be tricky and once found it can be hard to follow in places as it is NOT clearly marked. The trail rises and falls over the shoulders of several mountains. After 3.5 miles you arrive at the Big Pond trail head parking area on the Barkaboom Rd. Walk down the access road to the main road. Turn right on the road and follow it for a short distance then make a left up into the woods. After another .75 miles, you will be near the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn left and hike 1.15 miles to Little Pond Campgrounds on the blue Campgrounds Trail. This descent is a steep, at times, but short. Walk .85 miles down the access road/driveway to the Barkaboom Road and make a right. Walk a short distance to the Beaverkill Road and turn left. Walk on the Beaverkill Road for about 1.4 miles and make a left on Alder Creek Road. Alder Lake parking is about 2.5 miles away at the end of the road.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is near the summit of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the Barkaboom and Beaverkill Roads.)


Alder Lake: Millbrook RidgeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.6 mi. 1940 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

I had lived in Livingston Manor for 25 years before I managed to visit Alder Lake. Several people had told me how beautiful it is but I just hadn't made it there. The lake IS very pretty and is frequented by many people. Campsites dot the entire perimeter of the lake. The Alder Lake Loop Trail is about 1.6 miles and suitable for beginners with only a slight rise on one side. The hikes to the Beecher Lake overlook or to Balsam Lake Mountain on the other hand have several steep areas and can be quite a challenge. The distances, 8 and 13 miles respectively, may also be daunting for some. The map above shows the out and back route from Alder Lake along Millbrook Ridge to the Beecher Lake overlook. I have labeled some of the points of interest along the way. The Beecher Lake overlook is beautiful with a nice view of the lake and the Zen Buddhist monastery that is on its shores.

Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Park in the parking lot and walk to the lake. The Coykendall Mansion house that stood on the grounds has been removed by New York State as they did not have the money to maintain or restore it. Now only the stone work remains. As you walk toward the lake you stay to the left on the red Alder Lake loop trail. After about .8 miles on this trail the yellow Millbrook Ridge trail breaks off heading east. The trail ascends very gently and after about 1.5 miles on the trail you arrive at the Beaver Meadow lean-to and spring. There once was a large beaver pond here but it is now being reclaimed and forming a meadow.

Back on the trail you will pass another pond on your right after which the trail climbs more steeply. After about 1.35 miles you are at the highest point on the ridge (3480 ft). The trail then descends slightly before another ascent to the overlook; a distance of another 1.1 miles. Along the Wat the trail does not head directly east but loops north and then southeast back t the viewpoint. The overlook has been obscured by the trees that have grown up over the years and it is easier to get a view when there are no leaves on the trees. The return trip simply reverses your trip out. When you get to the Alder Lake loop trail, you can go the other way around to add a little variety.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image shows the vertical profile of the entire out and back route.)


Andes Rail Trail (Complete)Trails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.7 mi. 735 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The trailhead for the Andes Rail Trail is located at 266 Depot St, Andes, NY. One way to get there is to drive north on Tremperskill Road ROM where Route 30 crosses the Pepacton Reservoir at the Dunraven Bridge. When the road ends in Andes, turn left and drive less than a quarter mile to the sign that says "Andes Rail Trail" on the left. You may also follow Route 28 from the Margaretville area. In Andes when Route 28 turns right to head north, continue straight ahead for another quarter mile to the sign that says "Andes Rail Trail" on the left. There isn't really much of a parking area but try to park by the gate leaving enough for someone to open the gate if they needed to do so. Start your by walking through the gate to the Andes Depot which was constructed in 1907 and was donated by the Decker family. A kiosk near the depot explains a little about the rail trail which follows the railroad bed of the Delaware and Northern Railroad. Shortly after the depot, there is a wooden walkway that spans the only really wet spot on the trail. A little after that there is an open spot with a nice view down the Tremperskill. At this point there is a "high road" and a "low road" with the suggestion that the high road be used when the main trail is muddy. This occurs several other places along the trail. Hiked under the trees for a short time before coming to another nice view and an interpretive sign. The sign explains that the foundation is the remains of the Andes turntable that was used to turn engines around. No pictures exist of the original structure but it was called an "Armstrong turntable" since the engineer and fireman had to use their "strong arms" to pivot the engine! Enter the woods again and cross a small bridge. There are regular "bumps" on the trail which are the railroad ties which were not been removed. A couple of ties are exposed along the way. Another interpretive sign explains that there had been two trestles on the rail line in the area. Both had been featured in movies from the early 20th century! After walking a little farther, the flat rail trail ends and the Bullet Hole Spur Trail begins. Continued on the trail which immediately begins to climb and the easy walking ends. A major switchback takes the trail north before heading south again with the trail always climbing. The trail passes through some hardwoods and then enters a hemlock forest as it climbs to the shoulder of Hemlock Knoll. There are some interesting rock formations along the way. Continue until the trail comes to a stone wall with a break that allows a view of the surrounding hills which is not impressive but pretty. Pass over the stone wall where it has been turned into steps and come to the loop at the end of the Bullet Hole Spur Trail. Continue straight ahead and walk through a planted red pine plantation. The trail eventually joins a woods road that parallels the Temperskill. The loop is only half a mile long and soon you will be back at the point where it started. Retrace your steps back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image shows the vertical profile of the entire out and back route.)


Angel FallsTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 0.6 mi. 137 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Turn onto Route 55A from Route 55 just east of the TriValley School in Grahamsville, Take the first right hand turn as Route 55A continues around the Rondout Reservoir. Drive for a little over 4 miles and turn left on Yahweh Road just before Route 55A crosses a creek on a bridge. After 1.2 miles turn right on Shalom Road which is now a DEAD END. Park at the end of the paved road near the power right-of-way but avoid parking on private property or blocking the private driveway. The DEP signs are confusing with some saying TRESPASSING and others inviting hikers to hike. Walk down the old road which is now crumbling. This road stays above the stream bed for Tout Creek until it reaches the upper falls. You may walk to the stream above the falls before following the informal path that parallels the stream. Some paths lead down to the stream bed to points that give excellent views of the upper falls. These paths are DANGEROUS under the best conditions! Continue on the informal paths which parallel the stream until you get to the area of the lower falls. The lower falls do not have a drop as high as the upper falls but they are beautiful in their own way. Walk to the rock shelf that allows access to the top of the lower falls to take some pictures. Continue along the creek and observe the stone foundations built next to the falls. Walk out to the stream bed using great caution to get a glimpse of the lower falls. When you are finished, head up the steep bank back to the old road and your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image shows the vertical profile of the entire out and back route.)


Anthony's Nose and Bear MountainTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.5 miles 2400 feet GPSies

link to topo map Park in any of the parking lots at the Bear Mountain Inn off Route 202/9W. The two trails that allow access to Bear Mountain are the Appalachian Trail and the Major Welch Trail. Begin by walking passed the skating rink and down to the footpath around Hessian Lake. Stay to the left of the lake and look for the red on white blazes that mark the Major Welch Trail. Watch carefully for TWO of the blazes which signify the place where the trail turns left and into the woods. At first this trail slowly climbs passed the Overlook Lodge and the ascent seems easy. Look are definitely deceiving! Shortly the trail begins its real ascent which becomes steep and difficult at times with several short but interesting scrambles over exposed rock face. About 2/3 of the way up the mountain, the trail crosses Perkins Drive and then heads back into the woods. Near the top of the climb are several lookouts with spectacular views of the Hudson River and the Bear Mountain Bridge. The trail continues on to the top of the mountain and the Perkins Tower.

From here find the white blazes of the AT as it heads down the mountain. This trail is not as steep as the Major Welch as it winds its way down the mountain. The trail briefly intersects a road where you should turn right and follow it to a small parking area that overlooks the river. The trail turns right onto a road but immediately turns left and down into the woods. Continue following the AT. It will intersect the yellow blazed Suffern Bear Mountain Trail near the bottom. Turn left at this point and make your way back to the parking area.

At this point you can end the hike and feel very satisfied with the sights you have seen or you can set out to Anthony's Nose. Walk toward Hessian Lake but this time head to the right. Watch for the white blazes of the AT and the 1777 markers. You may take the tunnel under 9W and follow the AT through the zoo. This costs $1, is sometimes closed AND DOES NOT ALLOW PETS. You can also follow the shoulder of 9W to the Bear Mountain traffic circle. Cross here and head for the pedestrian Walkway on the north OR south side of the bridge. Take a moment to enjoy the views up and own the river. Straight ahead at the other end of the bridge rises Anthony's Nose. At the end of the bridge turn left and walk the shoulder of 9D for about .2 miles. Look for the white AT blazes and a trail head kiosk on the right side of the road. Here the AT turns up into the woods. The trail initially winds its way toward the rocky crag which is Anthony's Nose. Shortly it turns upward with several steep portions. A few level parts and switchbacks help you catch your breath. At the top the AT heads northeast to the left. Turn to the right on the woods road through Camp Smith. This trail is marked by blue blazes and heads directly toward your destination. Near the end of the trail there is an obvious blazed turn to the left. This DOES NOT lead to the Nose but does give some interesting views if the river and the surrounding mountains. Turn right at this T and you are at Anthony's Nose. Walk out to any of the prominent rock outcrops to get incredible views up and down the river. Be careful as there is no protection from a short but fast fall 900 feet to the river below. The views down on the bridge and to the water itself ARE breath taking. The way back is simply to retrace your steps perhaps taking the walkway on the other side of the bridge.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Anthony's Nose: AT from Route 9DTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 1.8 miles 790 feet GPSies

link to topo map Travel north on Route 9D from the eastern end of the Bear Mountain Bridge. There are several places to park cars along the shoulder or in pulloffs. Be careful walking along Route 9D as the cars travel too fast and the road is too narrow. The trailhead is marked by a sign on the right side of 9D headed north just after the bridge. There is no trail register here but the markings are the white blazes of the AT. The trail initially winds its way toward the rocky crag which is Anthony's Nose. Shortly it turns upward with several steep portions. A few level parts and switchbacks help you catch your breath. At the top, after only .5 miles, the AT heads northeast to the left. Turn RIGHT onto this wide woods road to head toward Anthony's Nose. As you approach the edge of the cliffs, turn up to your right to get to the lookout. Return to your car by reversing the route.

(The map on the left shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile




(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Anthony's Nose: Camp Smith Trail from Route 202Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.1 miles 850 feet GPSies

link to topo map Travel south on Route 9D from the eastern end of the Bear Mountain Bridge for about 1.1 miles and turn left on Route 202 (Jack Woods Road). Watch for the small parking area on the left. Park and start hiking north on the Camp Smith Trail. The trail immediately starts to gain some elevation, drops a little and then ascends to Anthony's Nose. At the top of the climb bear slightly to the left to get to the lookout. Return to your car by reversing the route.

(The map on the left shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile









(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Anthony's Nose: From South Mountain PassTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.2 miles 950 feet GPSies

link to topo map Travel north on Route 9D from the eastern end of the Bear Mountain Bridge for about 1.4 miles and turn on Manitou Road on the right. At the T turn right on South Mountain Pass Road. Drive .5 miles and watch for the small trail head parking on the right. Get on the wide woods road which is the Appalachian Trail.Follow the trail to the right as it starts level and then gains some elevation. At around 1 mile the AT heads right and down to the river. Continue straight ahead to Anthony's Nose. As you approach the edge of the cliffs, turn up to your right to get to the lookout. Return to your car by reversing the route.

(The map on the left shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile





(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Anthony's Nose: Phelps Mine and Camp Smith TrailTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.7 miles 2550 feet GPSies

link to topo map Travel north on Route 9D from the eastern end of the Bear Mountain Bridge. There are several places to park cars along the shoulder or in pulloffs. Be careful walking along Route 9D as the cars travel too fast and the road is too narrow. The trailhead is marked by a sign on the right side of 9D headed north just after the bridge. There is no trail register here but the markings are the white blazes of the AT. The trail initially winds its way toward the rocky crag which is Anthony's Nose. Shortly it turns upward with several steep portions. A few level parts and switchbacks help you catch your breath. At the top, after only .5 miles, the AT heads northeast to the left. Turn onto this wide woods road to head toward South Mountain Pass trailhead. The road is wide but rocky. Follow the blazes as they turn left into the woods. Obey the posted signs which mark Camp Smith, an active Army National Guard training site! The trail rolls up and down and switches back and forth several times. After about 1 mile it meets another woods road. Turn left and walk out to the trailhead if you wish. On to the way back you will have to bushwhack up the mountain to find the mine. Look for an informal campsite and head up and east. The Phelps mine is clearly marked on the NYNJTC maps. At some point you may hit another woods road that leads directly to the mine.

As you approach the mine you will notice a slope of "rusty" tailings. Look up the right and walk in that direction and you will see an old, rusty fence surrounding the adit to the mine. At least one section of the fence is down allowing access to the mine adit. Be VERY careful around the mine entrance. The stones are loose and the mine is DEEP! Outside the fence and a little to the right is an airshaft with a grate. Looking through the tailings and mine waste may reveal some mineral samples. The mine was originally opened as an iron mine but copper, zinc and sulfur were all extracted. When you have had enough, retrace your route back to the woods road and follow the At back to where you ascended from 9D. Continue straight ahead for .5 miles to Anthony's Nose. Depending on the season and the weather the views here can be quite different. They are always interesting but may be clearer or more beautiful on a particular day. The Bear Mountain Bridge is directly below and the Popolopen Gorge Bridge and footbridge below are visible. Bear Mountain with the Perkins Tower are directly across the Hudson. Looking south reveals Iona Island and Indian Point. Depending on the day you may see trains on the tracks on the west side of the river, pleasure boats and barges on the river and birds riding the air currents.

Return to the blue trail from Anthony's Nose and walk straight ahead to another viewpoint. This one has a USGS seal at the top. Continue on down the blue Camp Smith Trail. The trail descends for 1 mile until it reaches a trailhead on Route 202 north of the bridge. (Continuing along this trail for just under 2 miles will bring you to the start of the trail at the Hudson Highlands Gateway.) Along the way there are a few other viewpoints but none as nice as Anthony's Nose. At the trailhead turn around and retrace your path to Anthony's Nose and then to the trail that leads down and back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ashokan High Point: Kanape Brook LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.1 mi. 2370 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Kanape Brook to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail here is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward for about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these five areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. This 2.5 mile trail meanders up to the High Point. Stay to the right and ascend the steeper path using the other trail to descend forming a loop. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a spectacular view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough's Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. After taking in the view, head to the left of the fireplace and follow a path into the woods to pick up the trail again. This 2.5 mile trail meanders down from the High Point back to the trail junction where you met it the first time. There are several steep and rocky areas to negotiate. Along the way there is at least one prominent path leading northwest but seemingly into nowhere. When the trail bends sharply to the left you can head southwest on a bushwhack which is steep in many places but will cut some distance off your return trip. Back at the trail junction it is only a matter of following the main trail back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ashokan High Point: Kanape Brook Out and BackTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.3 mi. 2140 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Ashokan to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail hear is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward for about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. This 2.5 mile trail meanders up to the High Point. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a spectacular view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough's Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. To get back to your car turn around and retrace your path back to the parking area. The out and back allows a quick descent of the steeper sections for those who don't mind this sort of thing.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the out and back hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ashokan High Point and Little Ashokan: Kanape Brook LoopTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.8 mi. 2820 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Ashokan to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail here is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward for about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout.

From the High Point you may be able to see a path directly down between some of the rocks or a path further on leading down. This is the way to Little Ashokan High Point. The walk is about .5 miles and there is drop of about 350 feet to the lowest point before climbing back up to Little Ashokan. Whether or not you can find the path is not too important. just walk in the general direction and watch for the numerous steep areas and actual cliffs. Little Ashokan is filled with blueberry and huckleberry bushes which can make walking interesting unless you are on show shoes. Near the highest point are several flat rocks that make a good viewpoint back to the High Point and over to the Mombaccus-Little Rocky ridge. Dropping down a little to some lower paths and walking around to the left offers some more views but the reservoir is hard to see unless the leaves are off the trees. Views may be possible but unobstructed views for photography are few. After wandering around some, head back to the High Point more or less the way you came. From the High Point continue on the main trail. In a short distance on the left you may get some views in a small clearing. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough's Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. After taking in the view, head to the left of the fireplace and follow a path into the woods to pick up the trail again. This 2.5 mile trail meanders down from the High Point back to the trail junction where you met it the first time. There are several steep and rocky areas to negotiate. Along the way there is at least one prominent path leading northwest but seemingly into nowhere. When the trail bends sharply to the left you can head southwest on a bushwhack which is steep in many places but will cut some distance off your return trip. Back at the trail junction it is only a matter of following the main trail back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ashokan High Point and Little Ashokan: Kanape Brook Out and BackTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.5 mi. 2717 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Ashokan to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail here is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward for about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout.

From the High Point you may be able to see a path directly down between some of the rocks or a path further on leading down. This is the way to Little Ashokan High Point. The walk is about .5 miles and there is drop of about 350 feet to the lowest point before climbing back up to Little Ashokan. Whether or not you can find the path is not too important. just walk in the general direction and watch for the numerous steep areas and actual cliffs. Little Ashokan is filled with blueberry and huckleberry bushes which can make walking interesting unless you are on show shoes. Near the highest point are several flat rocks that make a good viewpoint back to the High Point and over to the Mombaccus-Little Rocky ridge. Dropping down a little to some lower paths and walking around to the left offers some more views but the reservoir is hard to see unless the leaves are off the trees. Views may be possible but unobstructed views for photography are few. After wandering around some, head back to the High Point more or less the way you came. From the High Point continue on the main trail. In a short distance on the left you may get some views in a small clearing. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough's Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. After taking in the view, turn around and retrace your steps following the route you took on the ascent back to your car at the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bald Mt (Stamford)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.5 mi. 953 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

From the junction of Routes 23 and 10 in Stamford, drive .9 miles north on Route 10 to Archibald Field on the right. Park in the first parking area. To begin the hike walk to the gravel road just south of the parking area and turn left heading east. Soon you will cross a stream on a footbridge where the fun really begins. There are many trails in this area and all are blazed but there are no maps which makes the blazes useless. All is not lost as you want to hike "east and up". There are several different routes to the top with some being longer and others shorter. It seems that all these routes converge on one final trail that approaches the summit from the west. Just before the summit there is a nice lookout on the left which has excellent views to the north. As you reach the top of Bald Mountain you will see some old buildings and the remains of a chair lift. At one time this mountain was home to the Deer Run Ski Area which is no longer in operation. Explore the summit which as at least a 180 degree view before returning to the parking area. It may interest you to return by a slightly different route than the one you used to ascend.

(The map above shows the parking area and one possible hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Balsam Lake Mt to Alder LakeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.8 mi. 2630 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Park at the trailhead at the end of the Beaverkill Road. The public road dead ends at this spot and a private road continues to the Balsam Lake Lodge. There are several choices to make when climbing this mountain. Find the blue-blazed Dry Brook Ridge Trail and hike about .9 miles. At this point turn left on the red-blazed Balsam Lake Trail. The climb is rather steep but after about .85 miles you will be at the summit. As you climb, you will see the trail to the Balsam Lake Mt lean-to on the left after about .5 miles. Walk another .1 miles and there will be an obvious piped spring on the right. Just above the spring the trail levels. Continue for another .2 miles and you will see the yellow-blazed Millbrook Ridge Trail to Alder Lake on the left. Continue for another .15 miles to the fire tower. The fire tower at the top offers a spectacular view in all directions. Balsam Lake Mountain is the westernmost in the Catskill Park and the tower offers an unhindered 360 degree view. Thirty-three of the other 34 peaks are visible with only Thomas Cole, hiding behind Hunter Mt., out of view.

Turn back on the Balsam Lake Mt. trail to the Millbrook Ridge Trail and turn right. This trail descends for a while and then ascends again. After 1.95 miles there is a lookout over Beecher Lake. There is a Zen Monastery on the shore. In another 1.1 miles including a short climb you will be at the highest point on the ridge. The elevation here is 3480 feet which means that it is one large boulder away from being another Catskill 35! In 1.35 miles you will be at the Beaver Meadow lean-to and spring. Several of these "beaver meadows" can be found along the trail and they all offer a home to a variety of wildlife. A walk of about 1.5 miles will bring you to the red-blazed Alder Lake Trail. Turn left or right and walk .8 miles to the Alder Lake parking area.

At Alder Lake you can reverse your steps and hike back to Balsam Lake. This makes for a LONG 15 mile hike. It may be more enjoyable to hike with a friend and leave a car at both trailheads. You could, of course, reverse this hike which would give a slightly different perspective. At Alder Lake be sure to look at the remains of the mansion built by shipping tycoon Samuel Coykendall. New York State recently removed all but the stonework after determining it would be impossible to restore the once stately edifice.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Balsam Lake Mt and Vly PondTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.5 mi. 2900 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Park at the trailhead at the end of the Beaverkill Road. The public road dead ends at this spot and a private road continues to the Balsam Lake Lodge. There are several choices to make when climbing this mountain. Find the blue-blazed Dry Brook Ridge Trail and hike about .9 miles. At this point turn left on the red-blazed Balsam Lake Trail. The climb is rather steep but after about .85 miles you will be at the summit. As you climb, you will see the trail to the Balsam Lake Mt lean-to on the left after about .5 miles. Walk another .1 miles and there will be an obvious piped spring on the right. Just above the spring the trail levels. Continue for another .2 miles and you will see the yellow-blazed Millbrook Ridge Trail to Alder Lake on the left. Continue for another .15 miles to the fire tower. The fire tower at the top offers a spectacular view in all directions. Balsam Lake Mountain is the westernmost in the Catskill Park and the tower offers an unhindered 360 degree view. Thirty-three of the other 34 peaks are visible with only Thomas Cole, hiding behind Hunter Mt., out of view.

Continue your hike down the back side of Balsam Lake. At the trail junction turn right to return to your car. DO NOT get in your car. Walk to the other side of the parking area and pick up the Hardenburgh Trail to Vly Pond.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Basha Kill towards WurtsboroTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.7 mi. 96 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Basha Kill is a 2400 acre wetland and wildlife preserve in the southern part of Sullivan County. Among other things it is home to at least 50 species of birds and especially bald eagles. The remains of the Port Jervis to Kingston branch of the O&W forms a rail trail on the southeastern shore. On the northwestern shore is the D&H Canal and the towpath. The two can be combined for a loop using Haven Road to cross the marsh on the northern end and Otisville Road to swing around the southern end. This loop is over 10 miles and would be difficult for beginning hikers!

Take Route 17/I 86 to exit 113 and head south on Route 209 toward Port Jervis. After 1.7 miles turn left on Haven Road. Follow the road as it crosses the Basha Kill. At the first intersection turn left and park in the large lot. Head northeast on the old railroad bed which makes up a good part of the SRT in this area. There are no blazes for either the SRT or Long Path but the route is clear as it simply follows the railbed. Within a short distance there is a nice viewpoint over the Basha Kill to the ridges beyond. At about .5 miles there is a path to the left leads to an observation tower with good views to the north and west. You may choose to visit the tower on the way out or on the way back. You may encounter a few wet areas on the trail and some mud. There are also several places where old wooden bridges cross the water. These bridges are slowly deteriorating and the whole atmosphere is one of neglect. At 1.8 miles there is an underpass beneath the highway allows hikers and wildlife to pass without a problem! At 2.3 miles the trail ends at Pennsylvania Avenue just outside of Wurtsboro. Turn around and retrace your steps to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

(The profile of the hike is not posted as the walk is almost completely flat and the profile makes it look much more daunting!)


Basha Kill TowerTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 2.3 mi. 94 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Basha Kill is a 2400 acre wetland and wildlife preserve in the southern part of Sullivan County. Among other things it is home to at least 50 species of birds and especially bald eagles. The remains of the Port Jervis to Kingston branch of the O&W forms a rail trail on the southeastern shore. On the northwestern shore is the D&H Canal and the towpath. The two can be combined for a loop using Haven Road to cross the marsh on the northern end and Otisville Road to swing around the southern end. This loop is over 10 miles and would be difficult for beginning hikers!

Take Route 17/I 86 to exit 113 and head south on Route 209. After about 1.7 miles Haven Road appears on the left. Turn left here and drive to the parking area on the left to park. Start your hike by walking southeast on Haven Road through the marsh toward the rail trail on the eastern shore. Turned left or northeast on the rail trail. The trail here is relatively firm even when it has been raining. After about a mile watch for a trail to an observation tower and turn left on this unmarked trail. Within .1 miles you will be at the tower which is more of an observation platform. There are nice views over the marsh to the north and west. Return to the main trail and turn right to retrace your steps to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

(The profile of the hike is not posted as the walk is almost completely flat and the profile makes it look much more daunting!)


Bear Mt. And Lion's Head (CT)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 13.2 mi. 3205 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Bear Mt. is the highest peak in the state but the highest point is further north and west on the shoulder of Mount Frisell which is mostly in Massachusetts.

Park at the AT parking lot .8 miles north of the Route 44/Route 41 junction in Salisbury, CT. on Route 41. The entrance to the parking area is VERY narrow and not well marked. The parking area will accommodate 8 to 10 cars and is a popular place for many day hikers. The trailhead has a large signboard and a privy maintained by the AMC. The first part of the trail to the Lion's Head is wide and pretty smooth and the elevation gain is minimal. Several turns and switchbacks make the climb even easier. At about 1.4 miles you will cross a running stream with cool, clear water. At just over 2.0 miles the Lion's Head Trail joined from the left coming in from Bunker Hill Road. From this junction the trail becomes rockier and harder to walk. It also becomes much steeper as it ascends the Lion's Head with the very last part being an open rock outcrop. After another .25 miles, at about 2.3 miles into the hike, you will arrive at the viewpoint known as the Lion's Head. The views from here are expansive but be prepared to share the view with others! Leave the Lion's head and continue on the AT north toward Bear Mt. At 2.64 miles the Bald Peak Trail joins the AT from the left. The AT in this area is not exposed but instead runs under a leafy canopy most of the way meaning that it is protected but has no views. Along the way to Bear Mt. there are several places to camp and a few water sources. The Riga Lean-to comes up at 3.0 miles into the hike, followed by the Ball Brook campsite at 3.5 miles and the Brassie Brook Lean-to at 4.25 miles. In another .6 miles you will arrive at Riga Junction where the Undermountain Trail comes in from Route 41. Continue on the AT to the junction with Bear Mt. Road at 5.0 miles. From here the trail becomes much rockier and steeper. The AT winds up and over many rocky outcrops offering some limited viewpoints. You arrive at the summit of Bear Mountain at about 5.55 miles and the elevation is 2330 feet. At the top of the mountain is a stone pyramid more than large enough to accommodate 20 people. You can walk to the top of the pyramid to get views to the north and east but the views west and south are limited. To hike a loop head down the north side of Bear Mt. on the AT. The AT down Bear Mt. To the north is very steep. Most northern sides of mountains in this area are steeper than their southern counterparts due to the way glaciation eroded the rock. At a little more than 6.0 miles you will cross the border into Massachusetts and then arrive at a trail junction. Straight ahead the AT leads to Sage's Ravine. Turn right on the Paradise Lane Trail which immediately begins to gain some elevation. At 6.5 miles you will pass the Paradise Lane Group Campsite. From here the trail is flat or slightly downhill for the next 1.15 miles until you reached the junction with the Undermountain Trail at 7.6 miles. Turn right on the Undermountain Trail and start toward the AT at the Riga Junction. At 7.9 miles there is a bog. At 8.6 miles you will be back on the AT where you should turn left to head back to the Lion's Head and eventually the car. A long 2.4 mile stretch of the AT put you back at the Lion's Head. The hike back to the car is downhill.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Mountain: Bear and West MountainsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.9 mi. 2540 ft. GPSies

CHH peak map The easiest place to park to start this hike is at the Bear Mountain Inn parking area next to Hessian Lake. Parking costs $6 per car but there is lots of it and bathroom facilities are available. There area several ways to get to the parking area but Route 9W north or south is the easiest way. You can also take Seven Lakes Drive from Long Mountain Parkway (Route 6). Stay on Seven Lakes Drive through another traffic circle. Park in the back parking area. Walk the outdoor ice rink but turn left up the hill before it. At the top of a short, steep hill there is a road which is also marked with the yellow blazes of the Suffern-Bear Mountain Trail and the white blazes of the Appalachian Trail. Follow these blazes as the trail curves first to the right and then to the left as it descends and crosses a small stream. The trails then begin a continuous although not steep ascent. After only about .3 miles the AT turns to the right. Stay on the SBM Trail.

This trail continues to climb slightly before descending to cross Seven Lakes Drive after about .45 miles. It then continues to descend after meeting an old woods road until it meets the Doodletown Bridal Path after about .6 miles. Turn right here and follow the yellow blazes as the trail descends to Doodletown Brook after .5 miles. The brook is easily crossed in this area. On the left you may notice some paths down to another branch of the brook. These paths are created by other hikers looking for the Herbert Mine. Walk down to and across the brook and toward the rock to the south and slightly west. Watch for the LARGE piles of mine tailings and climb the hillside toward this mine debris. The main working of the Herbert Mine is a an open cut into the hillside which is impossible to miss. The cut appears to be 30 to 40 feet long and twenty feet high at the end. The cut in this area is filled with water but may go underground. When you have finished, walk up the hillside above the cut for a fresh perspective. There are several other pits and cuts in the area. Walk back west and northwest toward the brook. The SBM Trail is on the other side of the stream.

The trail now begins to ascend through laurel and begins to offer glimpses of some spectacular views. Wait since the best views are yet to come. There are several short buy steep climbs over rock piles before the trail breaks out into the open and continues to ascend to the summit of West Mountain and the West Mountain Ridge. After a little more than a mile it intersects with the blue blazed Timp-Torne Trail. You will want to turn right here to get back to bear Mountain but first turn left. In less than .1 miles is the West Mountain Shelter. The views from here are spectacular. Bald Mountain and The Timp are clearly visible. There is a nice view down to the Hudson River and on a clear day the Skyline of New York City can be seen. Retrace your steps and follow the blue and yellow blazes as they run concurrently.

In less than .25 miles the SBM trail turns left and heads south and west. Stay on the Timp-Torne Trail and in about the same distance the Appalachian Trail comes in from the left. The trails now wander along the ridge with interesting views on both sides. After 1.15 miles the trail split with the Timp-Torne Trail continuing on north and slightly west toward The Torne. Stay on the AT as it turns right and starts a long descent. Just before the descent are several views points over the Hudson River. Look carefully for the Bear Mountain Bridge. The Perkins Tower on the top of Bear Mountain can easily be scene straight ahead. It looks very close but there is a significant descent and ascent before reaching it. As you descend you will see the red Fawn Trail go off to the right. In .6 miles the AT crosses Seven Lakes Drive. Just before this the 1777W Trail crosses the AT. Turning right on this trail leads back to the Suffern-Bear Mountain Trail which may be an easier way to return to the parking area.

After crossing the road the AT ascends to the top of Bear Mountain at the Perkins Tower. The trail does undulate at times but the net results is always up. After .5 miles the AT meets the road and runs along Perkins Drive for .4 miles before cutting back into the forest and starting the final ascent to the tower. There are several viewpoints along Perkins Drive which are quite nice. After about .5 miles of ascent, the Perkins Tower comes into view. The views from Bear Mountain are nice but the views from West Mountain are better. Bear Mountain is more talked about since Perkins Drive allows easier access than the trails to West Mountain

After taking in the walk back to the AT and follow it down the mountain to the parking area. The trail crosses the road twice and goes through the picnic area. After ,4 miles it joins a road for about .25 miles before again entering the woods and descending. in .4 miles the AT again meets the SBM Trail that you were on earlier in the day. Retrace your path for .3 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Mountain: Bear Mt and The TorneTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.4 mi. 3420 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

The easiest place to park to start this hike is at the Bear Mountain Inn parking area next to Hessian Lake. Parking costs $6 per car but there is lots of it and bathroom facilities are available. There area several ways to get to the parking area but Route 9W north or south is the easiest way. You can also take Seven Lakes Drive from Long Mountain Parkway (Route 6). Stay on Seven Lakes Drive through another traffic circle. Park in the back parking area. Walk along the front of the outdoor ice rink and continue on the pathway on the left side of the lake. Just before the end of the lake, watch for the spot where the red on white blazes turn left off the pathway and start up the hill at about .5 miles. The Major Welch Trail can be steep at times and runs across several exposed rock faces. The rocks can be slippery even when dry but are treacherous when wet.

At 1.5 miles the trail ascends sharply and crosses Perkins Drive for the first time. Go across the road and pick up the trail slightly to the left. As you ascend now occasionally look over your shoulder. As you near the top of the climb wonderful views of the Bear Mountain Bridge will appear below. You can also Se up and down the river for some distance depending on the weather. At 1.71 miles cross Perkins Drive again and walk passed the tower to the lookout area. Here you can see the river below and get good views of the surrounding area. On a clear day it is possible to see the Manhattan skyline to the south. When you are done. walk on Perkins Drive through the parking area to the left of the tower. Look for the white blazes of the at coming up the hill. Turn left and descend until you meet Perkins Drive at 2,25 miles. As you walk down this section of the trail you will cross several rocky areas and walk through laurel "tunnels".

Walk down the road following the AT until it enters the woods on the right at 2.7 miles. Be careful of the vehicle traffic when the road is open. Continue to follow the AT and cross Seven Lakes Drive at 3.1 miles. Immediately after crossing the road look for the metal disks that are labeled 1777W. They should appear on your right just after crossing the road. Get on this trail and follow it until 3.88 miles where it again meets Seven Lakes Drive. Walk along the road following the blazes as the trail crosses over Rout 9W. Turn right at 3.95 miles and watch for Queensboro Lake and its dam at 4.05 miles. You will be on a paved pathway briefly until it becomes more rustic after it passes a building on your left. At 4.3 miles the trail intersects a woods road and the signage is unclear. Turn RIGHT onto the road and watch for the blazes as the trail shortly turns right at 4.4 miles.

At 4.7 miles the trail crosses a creek on an interesting "bridge". The exact nature of this bridge and some of the "structures" next to it are unclear. At 5.35 miles the trail splits. Straight ahead the trail leads to Route 9W. For now turn left and cross a substantial footbridge across Popolopen Creek. Follow the trail as it turns right unto a road and then immediately left up into the woods. At 5.5 miles the trail crosses Mine Road and then begins to wind around to the "back" of The Torne. From here the trail ascends STEEPLY up The Torne. There are several rocks scrambles and the ascent can be VERY tricky when the rock is wet or covered in ice or snow. As you ascend views of Bear Mountain and the Hudson River come into view. The Bear Mountain Bridge and Anthony's Nose are spread out below. The top of The Torne is completely open and has little vegetation making it ideal for viewing in all directions. You can look up and down the river and east and west. Don't miss the monument at the top constructed of rocks carried from the base of The Torne to the top to remember members of the armed services killed in the war in Iraq. When you are done retrace your steps carefully back to the bridge and up the hill to the trail you cam in one from the southeast.

> Turn to your left at 6.1 miles and to the east. Walk the trail along Popolopen Gorge and the creek. At 7.1 miles watch for a dam on your left. The view varies depending on the foliage on the trees. Continue on the trail until it meets the road at 7.27 miles. BE CAREFUL at this point as you walk the road up to the Bear Mountain traffic circle and cross over to the far side to get to Hessian Lake and the path around it at 7.55 miles. Follow the paved path around the lake by turning left and heading toward the Bear Mountain and back to the parking lot to complete the 8.4 mile trip.

(The map above shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)


link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Mountain: Cornell Mine Trail to Bald MountainTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.0 miles 1290 ft GPSies

link to topo map Park on Route 9W where it meets Route 202 from the Bear Mountain traffic circle. The parking is just after a small bridge over Doodletown Creek. Cross the road and get on the trail just to the left of the bridge. The blazes for the Cornell Mine Trail are blue and quite visible. Like all the trails in the park there is no sign that announces the beginning of the trail. After a short climb the trail levels and then rolls for a while. When the water levels are high the creek has several nice rapids and small falls. As you are walking you cannot help but notice that up ahead the land rises quickly. When the trail does start to climb it starts gently but rapidly increases in difficulty. Most of the climbing would be almost impossible without the switchbacks, Switchbacks add to the hiking distance but make the climbing easier. Just when you think the hardest part is over near the top, the last few hundred feet get steeper! Near the top the trail ends where it meets the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Turn right on this red blazed trail. A short hike puts you on Bald Mountain facing directly toward Bear Mountain. The Perkins Tower is clearly visible almost two miles to the north. Just down from the summit of the mountain are several depressions and one tunnel that make up the Cornell Mines. At this point you can retrace your way back down the Cornell Mine Trail or use one of the trails on the other side of Bald Mountain to make a loop.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route as out and back.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Mountain: LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.4 miles 1200 feet GPSies

link to topo map Park in any of the parking lots at the Bear Mountain Inn off Route 9W. The two trails that allow access to Bear Mountain are the Appalachian Trail and the Major Welch Trail. Anyone not familiar with the area will probably miss the point at which the Major Welch Trail leaves the paved loop around Hessian Lake. I recommend taking the Appalachian Trail up the mountain the first time and using the Major Welch to return. Head for the outdoor ice skating rink. As you walk from the rink to Hessian Lake, a paved trail leads up a hill. This was the access road to the old ski jump which has not been used for MANY years. Follow the white blazes of the Appalachian Trail as it winds its way up the mountain. In some spots there are some bare rock faces to climb up at angles over 40 degrees. Some people go around while others go right up the rock. The trail meets a dead end road with a circle that many people use to view the river valley below. Walk up the road for a short while watching for a SMALL sign for the tower on your left. As you head up to the tower there are several opportunities to walk off the trail to a lookout to take in the view. The trail crosses Perkins Memorial drive several times. You can lose the trail at times but just keep heading for the tower. The view from the top is very nice on a clear day. Be sure to look south. About two miles away is Bald Mountain which is also a popular destination for hikers. Walk around the tower clockwise and down the access road. Walk off to your right and try to find the red blazed Major Welch Trail. Just after this trail begins there are several spectacular lookouts. The trail then begins a rather steep descent toward Hessian Lake. This trail also has some open and bare rock faces to negotiate. There are several additional opportunities for views but none are as good as at the top. Eventually the trail meets the paved loop trail around Hessian Lake. Turn right for the short way back or turn left to enjoy a walk around the lake. Make a mental note of where the Major Welch trail meets the path so that you can reverse the loop next time.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Mountain: Steps Trail LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.3 miles 2182 feet GPSies

link to topo map Park in any of the parking lots at the Bear Mountain Inn off Route 9W. The three trails that allow access to Bear Mountain are the Appalachian Trail, the Major Welch Trail and the new Steps Trail. Anyone not familiar with the area will probably miss the point at which the Major Welch Trail leaves the paved loop around Hessian Lake. I recommend taking the Appalachian Trail or the Steps Trail up the mountain the first time. This route uses the Steps Trail and then forms a big loop around the bear Mountain Park.

Head for the outdoor ice skating rink. As you walk from the rink to Hessian Lake, a paved trail leads up a hill. This was the access road to the old ski jump which has not been used for MANY years. At the top of the first climb DO NOT turn left on the road but continue straight ahead to climb the Steps Trail. The "steps" are hundreds of stone steps cut on the mountain and placed by volunteers to alleviate the damage to the ecology from the large volume of visitors to this area. The trail meets a dead end road with a circle that many people use to view the river valley below. Walk up the road for a short while watching for a SMALL sign for the tower on your left. As you head up to the tower there are several opportunities to walk off the trail to a lookout to take in the view. The trail crosses Perkins Memorial drive several times. You can lose the trail at times but just keep heading for the tower. The view from the top is very nice on a clear day. Be sure to look south. About two miles away is Bald Mountain which is also a popular destination for hikers. You may also see West Mountain with its stone shelter. The skyline of New York City can be seen to the south.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Mountain: The Torne from Popolopen GorgeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.7 mi. 1415 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The easiest place to park to start this hike is at the Bear Mountain Inn parking area next to Hessian Lake. parking costs $6 but there is lots of it and bathroom facilities are available. There area several ways to get to the parking area but Route 9W north or south is the easiest way. You can also take Seven Lakes Drive from Long Mountain Parkway (Route 6). Stay on Seven Lakes Drive through another traffic circle. Park in the back parking area. Walk toward the outdoor skating rink and down the hill toward Hessian Lake. Walk around Hessian Lake on the right or east side. You will be walking north toward the Bear Mountain Traffic Circle. Leave the path and walk up toward Route 9W and the traffic circle. CAREFULLY cross the traffic circle and walk along Route 9W north as it leaves the traffic circle. Watch for three red on white rectangular blazes on the left side of the road. This is the beginning of the Popolopen Gorge Trail.

The P-G Trail more or less parallels Popolopen Creek and the sights and sounds are very pleasing. The trail rises and falls but continuously gains some elevation. At times you are closer to the creek than others. In a short distance is a dam on the creek and the remains of a mill with the millpond behind the dam. As you continue along the trail you will see a rather impressive hill on your right. This is The Torne, the object of the hike. You will also find "manhole" covers at regular intervals. These are access points for the West Point Aqueduct. The noise of traffic competes with the babble of the brook as the trail comes very close to Route 6 in places. On the far bank of the creek a stone "wall" is noticeable. This supports the Timp-Torne, 177 and 1179 trails that you will use on your return. After a little more than a mile, you will be at the junction with the Blue marked Timp-Torne Trail.

Make a left turn at this point and head down toward the creek. Don't worry about finding a way across. There is a brand new metal footbridge. Take some time to enjoy the sights and sounds of the creek before continuing on to the other side. After a slight ascent the trail turns left. The turn is marked but a woods road also goes left. This is typical of the area where trails and woods roads cross each other frequently. Generally the trails are well-marked but a map, compass and GPS can all be VERY helpful. In a short distance the Timp-Torne Trail turns left while the 1777 and 1779 Trails continue straight ahead. Turn left and ascend slightly to Mine Road. Go across the road and find the trail marking on the other side. Now get ready to climb.

The trail up the Torne is steep at times and, in several areas, passes over rock outcroppings with some tricky food and hand holds. CAUTION: Wet, icy and snowy conditions will make this ascent dangerous! The trail follows the pattern of short steep ascents followed by flatter areas for recovery. There are very few workarounds available. As you climb be sure to look around at the views back to Bear Mountain and down to the Hudson River. You can see the Bear Mountain Bridge and Anthony's Nose clearly. Of course, These views are not as good as the ones from the top. Continue on up until there is no more up. At the top of the Torne is a stone cairn. As the sign explains, the stones were all carried form the bottom of the hill to the top to commemorate the sacrifice of soldiers fighting overseas. The cairn is also decorated with many Boy Scout emblems as this is a popular destination for scout troop hikes.

From the top you can retrace your path back to the junction with the 1777 and 1779 Trails. You can also follow the Timp-Torne trail as it makes a sort of loop and continues on another route down the Torne. No matter which path you take you will cross over Mine Road again and meet up with the other trails. You can, of course, retrace your steps to the car but staying on the north side of the creek is a nice alternative. turn left on the Timp-Torne, 1777 and 1779. Notice the stone support beneath the trail that was visible from the other bank. The trail rises and falls on the way toward Brooks Lake. At one point you will come to a road. Turn right and continue on down the road watching for trail markers on the left side. When you turn into the woods you will see Brooks Lake appear almost immediately. This areas was opened in 2005 and is used by residents for camping and day use.

Continue passed Brook Lake up to a road. Turn left on the road and immediately pick up the trail on the other side. The trail continues to the woods and then leads to another road. Walk down the road and turn back onto the trail on the right. This short trail leads to the West Redoubt of the Revolutionary War era Fort Montgomery. From the Redoubt, return to the main trail and walk UNDER the Popolopen Creek Bridge and Route 9W. After a short ascent, the Fort Montgomery visitor's center will be straight ahead. Take some time to walk around the fort. Only the stone foundations of the buildings remain but placards explain the fort's construction and significance. There are foundations for the barracks, guard house, powder magazine and necessaries. The sight of the North Redoubt and Main Battery are marked. A replicate 32 pound cannon is at the site of the main battery. The views from this area are beautiful and help to explain why a fort was erected at this site. When you are done, walk back to and behind the visitor's center. Walk down a little hill to the creek and an impressive suspension footbridge. From the footbridge there are incredible views of the Bear Mountain Bridge and Anthony's Nose on the left and Popolopen Creek and the Popolopen Creek Bridge on the other.

The trail continues across another much smaller footbridge and up and under the Bear Mountain Bridge. The view from under the bridge is interesting. The trail leads up through the museum and zoo. If these are closed or if you hike with your dog, take the trail to the right which leads up to the toll booths and bypasses the zoo. From here walk west toward the traffic circle and cross over Route 9W to Hessian Lake. Walk back the way you originally came at the beginning of the hike or continue on around Hessian Lake. On the other side look for the red trail markings of the Major Welch Trail that is one of the trails to the top of Bear Mountain. The Appalachian Trail and the Suffern-Bear Mountain Trail also pass through this area. Return to your car on one of the many pathways.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Mountain: The Timp to The Torne with Bear MountainTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 14.3 mi. 4607 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The easiest place to park to start this hike is at the Bear Mountain Inn parking area next to Hessian Lake. Parking costs $7 but there is lots of it and bathroom facilities are available. There area several ways to get to the parking area but Route 9W north or south is the easiest way. You can also take Seven Lakes Drive from Long Mountain Parkway (Route 6). Stay on Seven Lakes Drive through another traffic circle. Park in the back parking area. Walk south toward the tunnel that goes under the road and watch for the red 1777E trail. Stay on this trail until the blue Cornell Mine Trail branches to the left and turn here to walk down to Route 9W. Walk along route 9W for a hundred feet and turn right into the woods along a small stream. You may want to walk down to the stream to tale pictures as there are several small waterfalls. The trail remains relatively flat for about a mile until it starts to climb Bald Mountain. The climb isn't too long and a few switchbacks make the trip easier if a little longer. In about .33 miles you will be at the end of the Cornell Mine Trail. Turn right on the red Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail and walk to the summit of Bald Mountain. At the summit there is a large open self of rock that has great views to the north of the Bear Mountain Bridge and West Mountain with its stone shelter. When you are done, walk back to the trail and head south.

The descent down Bald Mountain is steep in places and runs across some open rock but in manageable. At times you are surrounded by huge blocks of rock. Stay on the trail as it turns southwest and ignore the junctions with the red 1777 trail after about .7 miles. In another .2 miles turn right on the blue Timp-Torne Trail and ascend to the top of The Timp. From the top of The Timp there are nice views of Bald Mountain and Tompkins Lake below. On clear days you may also be able to see the New York City skyline. Leave The Timp and continue on the blue trail as it descends The Timp into the area between it and the West Mountain ridge. The climb up to West Mountain is steep at times but isn't very long. In about .8 miles you will be near the highest point and will arrive at the West Mountain shelter. The shelter is very busy during peak hiking times and is well-constructed out of stone. From here you can look back at The Timp and also have a chance to get another view of the city skyline. Take some pictures and then continue on the blue trail passing two trail junction with the yellow Suffern-Bear Mountain Trail. In about .35 miles the Appalachian Trail comes in from the left and runs along with the Timp-Torne Trail for some distance.

Continue on the ridge along the blue trail. There are nice views to the left including some down to the Anthony Wayne State park parking lots. Soon the AT breaks to the right and the trail travels along a rocky ridge before descending over some open rock. You will pass the junction with the red Fawn Trail and the white Anthony Wayne Trail. The Timp-Torne Trail then intersects Seven Lakes Drive which you must cross with EXTREME caution. This is about 2 miles from the West Mountain shelter. Cross Seven Lakes Drive and walk along the opposite shoulder and over the overpass. Cross to the other side of the road and head down the paved path toward Queensboro Lake. This paved road soon turns to dirt and then in about .4 miles a sign warns "Shooting Range"! At this point the trail turns right and you should follow it.

The trail roams through some woods and crosses a stream on a narrow "bridge" before paralleling the stream on the high bank. In about a mile it turn to the left and crosses a stream on a well-constructed bridge. From here the trail ascends some stone steps, turns to the right, follows a woods road and then turns left up a hill. It crosses Mine Road and then begins a series of switchbacks up to The Torne. From the bridge it is about .25 miles to the beginning of the ascent up The Torne. This ascent is STEEP and passes over several areas of open rock with little to hold onto and not much good footing. One area requires you to make a choice of making it up a 60 degrees sloping rock or up and over a 4 foot drop. Trying to ascend and descend The Torne when it is wet or icy is a recipe for disaster. The ascent is only about .2 miles. Just before the summit is a viewpoint that looks down over the Hudson and the Bear mountain Bridge. To the right Bear Mountain is visible. At the summit is a 5 foot rock cairn. The rocks were carried from the bottom of the hill to the top to commemorate soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. When you are done, retrace your oath back to the bridge and walk back up to the main trail.

Turn left on the red Popolopen Gorge Trail which parallels the creek high on the bank but eventually drops almost to water level. Near the end of this trail is an old mill dam which holds back the creek and forms a pleasing waterfall. After 1.3 miles, the trail ends at Route 9W. Cross the road carefully and turn right and walk up to the traffic circle. Find the best way to continue across the circle and to the walkway around the lake. You may turn left and return to the car or continue on around the lake to ascend Bear Mountain. If you do want to go up the mountain, turning right may be a better idea. The walk to the head of the lake is about .5 miles. Turn right here to continue around the lake. Around .3 miles watch for the red blazes of the Major Welch Trail as they turn left into the woods.

The Major Welch trail starts out mildly but quickly becomes steep and ascend over some open rock. One place is so steep a chain is provided to help pull yourself up. After .8 miles of some serious climbing, the trail crosses Perkins Drive and continues to climb to the summit of Bear Mountain. Along the way are several fantastic viewpoints that look down on the river and the bridge. In about .5 miles the trail passes the Perkins Tower to another excellent lookout. After taking in the views, walk to the left and look for the white blazes of the AT that you will follow back to the lake. The trail weaves back and forth, reaches a dead end road to a circular parking area and then continues its descent down the mountain. Continue to follow the trail and in about 1.35 miles you will be a the top of a downhill that lead back to the lake. Walk down the hill and take a right at the bottom of the hill. Walk passed the ice rink to the parking lot and your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Central LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.3 mi. 1600 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto East Trout Brook Road and drive south. Pass Launt Pond on your right and then drive 1.3 miles further. Park on the left side of the road in the parking area. Cross the road to get on Trial 4 to the Fork Mountain ridge. The trail rises 750 feet from the road to the ridge over 1.2 miles. At the top of the ridge turn right or northwest to hike along the Fork Mountain Ridge. A little more than 2 miles into the hike and you will be at the first of three clear cut areas on the hike. No one has been able to tell me the reason for theses clear cuts but they are all done with state approval. The trail continues northwest over a few bumps and at 3.3 miles into the hike you cross West Trout Brook Road to continue on the trail. Continue almost directly north now toward Route 206 and cross the road again to walk through the main parking area. Follow the trail through the woods and out across a field. Look for the opening directly across the field. The trail parallels Route 206, crosses East Trout Brook Road and then ascends slightly before dropping to Wilson Hollow Road. This woods road is a grassy track and has never been paved but shows up on many maps with the same prominence as Route 206! At this point you will be at were at the second and largest clear cut area. Follow Wilson Hollow Road along the large clear cut area before the road entered the woods. Watch for Trail 11 on the right at about 6.8 miles into the hike. This trail leads back down to East Trout Brook Road and to another trail that will take you back to your car. It is an alternative route. Continue on the main trail/road passing another trail down within .6 miles of Trail 11. Continue to the McCoy Hill Shortcut at 7.7 miles. This trail turns right and runs along the edge of a field before descending through the forest to the last clear cut. Watch for a short path to the right that leads to a small field with a view over the clear cut and across to Fork Mountain. A little further down another trail comes in from the left. Stay on the main trail passing a pond and two final trail junctions before arriving at Middle Pond on East Trout Brook. Walk over the bridge and up to your car,

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: East Road Loop from Route 206Trails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.4 mi. 940 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Near the top of the mountain turn south on East Trout Brook Road. Drive 2.2 miles to the parking pulloff on the left for Middle Pond. Head down the trail to the pond and cross the bridge. Start up the trail toward McCoy Hill and then turn left on an unmarked path. At .4 miles the trail breaks out into a field. Follow the edge of the field along the brook and look for game paths as you bushwhack along the creek parallel to East Trout Brook Road. Your route may vary slightly from mine but as long as you stay between the brook and the rising land on the right you will be OK. There are a few wet spots to cross and you may chose to cross the tributaries to the main brook in some places. At about 1.3 miles you should catch a glimpse of the parking area. Cross one final stream crossing to get to the lot. Head across the parking area to the gate and start up the snowmobile trail. The first part of the trail is very steep averaging a 20% grade but only for about .15 miles. At 1.5 miles the trail turns southeast but continues to climb for the next .5 miles at about a 10% grade. At 2 miles the trail stops climbing and actually descends slightly before flattening out and following the contour of the hill for .4 miles. At 2.4 miles the trail begins to climb again and shortly after turns sharply to the left heading north. This only lasts for about .3 miles when it intersects the "main" trail on the ridge. Turn right to follow the trail toward the McCoy Hill Cutoff. The trail is mostly flat to the next junction. At 2.95 miles turn right onto the McCoy Hill Cutoff and walk along the edge of the field heading toward the woods on the other side. Head down the hill toward Middle Pond. The next 1.25 miles are all downhill at a comfortable 10% grade. There is an open area on the right with some nice views of the valley. At 3.8 miles the main trail comes in from the left but continue straight ahead down the hill. There is a small pond on the left with some more nice views. Cross the bridge at Middle Pond and walk the hill to the car in the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: East Road Loop from Route 206Trails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.9 mi. 1013 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Park in the bus turnaround just south of East Trout Brook Road. Hike a little north on Route 206 and then turn left onto a woods road that is also a snowmobile and hiking trail. The trails in the Bear Spring WMA are truly multi-use and are frequently used by people riding horses. Continued to walk straight ahead along the road just above a clear cut area. Smaller trees and brush along the edge of the road may block the best views of the valley and the hills on the other side. You may get some glimpses through the brush and the only way to get a good view is to fight through the brush and briars to the edge of the clear cut area. Continue on the main trail walking into an area with trees on both sides. The trail starts to climb a little and at 1.4 miles and 2.0 miles trails on the right descend from the ridge to the parking area just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 2.3 miles turn right and walk on the edge of a filed down the McCoy Hill Cutoff. It is a long descent toward a nice viewpoint on the right. When the trail opens up at the viewpoint, you may be able to get views down the valley to the south and across to the Fork Mountain Ridge to the west. Continue down the hill skirting another clear cut area on the right. At 3.2 miles you will have descended to a trail junction and a nice view of the trees on top of the ridge above the clear cut. Continue to descend on the trail toward Middle Pond. Along the way there are several nice views to the south and west to the Fork Mountain Ridge. At Middle Pond walk across the bridge at the outlet end over the spillway and out to East Trout Brook Road. Turn right on the road and get ready to regain the elevation lost in descending from the ridge. The road walk is easier than the trail and at 5.2 miles you will come to the southern end of Launt Pond after having already gained 300 feet of elevation back. Walk over to the outlet to the pond which is a very popular camping, swimming and boating destination in the summer. Walk back out to the road to continue your hike. At 6.2 miles you will be at Route 206 after gaining over 600 feet. Just before the road is a trail on the right. The road is easier to walk than the trail but the trail is safer! Turn right to walk back to the car to complete the hike.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: East Trout Brook LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.3 mi. 1262 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn right on East trout Brook Road and drive south. Pass Launt pond on your right and then drive 1.3 miles further. Park on the left side of the road in the parking area. Walk down the wide path/road and across the dam that creates a small pond. Continue straight ahead up the hill on the wide grassy snowmobile/horse trail. The trail climbs steadily now toward the ridge. At .35 miles a trail marked "New Trail" comes in on the left. Continue straight ahead to .68 miles. You will be in an area that has been clear cut, one of several in the park. Turn right and continue climbing until the trail junction at 1.23 miles. Turn left up the hill to the ridge. The climb ends at 1.61 miles into the hike. The trail now "rolls" along the ridge and starts a turn from east to northwest at about 1.85 miles. At 3.0 miles pass by a turn to the left through a field. This trail leads back to the trail junction at the base of the clear cut and is a good "early out". Continue to 3.33 miles and turn left down another wide trail. This trail initially heads south but them goes through a switchback that again turns northwest. The trail loses 715 feet to a parking area on East Trout Brook Road at 4.6 miles. You can walk the road south from here to your car. Make a sharp left turn onto a trail marked "New Trail" to avoid the road walk. This trail heads southeast for 1.3 miles until it reaches the trail junction at 5.9 miles you passed earlier. The trail is longer than the road walk and does ascend briefly in a few spots. Turn right and walk back to the dam and across the top to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Eastern TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.6 mi. 1253 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Park in the large pull off on the left hand side of the road just before the turn onto East Trout Brook Road. To start the hike, walk up the road to a wide woods road with a gate on your left. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediacies notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. in the first 3 miles. At 1.3 miles Trail 11 will enter from the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 2.3 miles Trail 3 joins from the right. This is where you will return after the loop. At this point the trail descends a little and then climbs slightly. Along the way the trail heads more to the southeast and a snowmobile trail comes in on the left from Downsville. Soon the trail begins to head down until at around 4 miles Trail 12 comes in from the left. Continue to bear to the right and follow Trail 2 as it continues to the lowest point on the hike, the junction with Trail 3 at 4.5 miles. Turn right here on Trail 3 to walk back up to the ridge to the area you passed earlier. At this point in the hike you may think you are in the wrong place but what your are looking at is ANOTHER clear cut area. After the turn Trail 3 climbs to a field that looks down over the clear cut area but also looks down the hollow for some good photographic opportunities. Continue on Trail 3 until it meets Trail 2 back on the ridge about 5.3 miles into the hike. Turn left and follow Wilson Hollow Road for the next 2.3 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Eastern Trails from trailheadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.6 mi. 1253 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto West Trout Brook Road and park at the main trailhead parking on the left hand side of the road. To start the hike, get on the trail just to the left of the information kiosk. These trails are for horseback riding and are not marked like hiking trails.Continue on this trail through a field and down a hill to where the trail crosses East Trout Brook Road. Continue across and bear left where the trail splits. Ascend a hill to another trail junction on the other side. Turn left and walk down the hill to a woods road. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediacies notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. in the first 3 miles. At 2.25 miles Trail 11 will enter from the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 3.1 miles Trail 3 joins from the right. Turn here and skirt the edge of a field before entering the woods and heading downhill. For .8 miles the trail loses 460 feet to the lowest point on the hike. Another clearcut area will appear on the right as you near the end of this section. There are some nice vies down the valley. At the bottom of the hill turn left and start to climb back up to the ridge. In a little more than half a mile the trail splits and you should continue by bearing left up to the ridge. The trail makes an abrupt change in direction from east to northwest and at 6.3 miles you will be back to where you started the loop. Follow Wilson Hollow Road back almost to Route 206. Turn left up the hill and follow your route back to the main trailhead.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise out and back direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Launt Pond LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.9 mi. 1027 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto West Trout Brook Road and park at the main trailhead parking on the left hand side of the road. To start the hike, get on the trail just to the left of the information kiosk. These trails are for horseback riding and are not marked like hiking trails.Continue on this trail through a field and down a hill to where the trail crosses East Trout Brook Road. Continue across and bear left where the trail splits. Ascend a hill to another trail junction on the other side. Turn left and walk down the hill to a woods road. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediacies notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. in the first 3 miles. At 2.25 miles Trail 11 will enter from the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 2.85 miles another woods road joins from the right. Turn right here walk down the trail to a nearly 180 degree turn at 3.0 miles. As you continue on this trail, a break in the trees on the left reveals another clearcut area. The trail ends, after 1.4 miles and a drop of 550 feet, at a parking area on East Trout Brook Road just south of Launt Pond. Turn right and walk .3 miles up to the pond. This is a favorite picnic and boating area during the season. Head back out to the road and turn left. Walk about a mile north on the road and gain around 300 feet. As you near Route 206, you will see the trail that you used to cross the road earlier in the hike. Turn left and follow your path from earlier back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise out and back direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Launt Pond LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.0 mi. 630 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked for hiking. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to nearly the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Pull off the road to the large parking area on the left just before East Trout Brook Road. To start the hike, walk west along the shoulder of Route 206 to the woods road or trail on the left. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediately notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. At around 1.3 miles Trail 11 will be on the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road.Turn right on this trail and descend 430 feet over the next .7 miles to a parking area on East Trout Brook Road. Turn right on the road and hike .3 miles north to Launt Pond. The pond has a dam at the outlet end and is a pretty spot to stop in any season. During the summer, there is a beach for swimming and canoe and kayak rental. Across the road from the pond is a camping area. After looking around, get back on the road and walk 1 mile north where the trail crosses just short of Route 206. Turn right on the trail and stay left at the fork. Walk over a hill and down the other side to Wilson Hollow Road. Turn left and walk back out to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Northeastern TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficulty 6.0 mi. 1100 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. This hike is the result of some wandering.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn into the park on West Bear trout Brook Road which is the main entrance. Only a few hundred feet in there will be a large trail head parking area on the left. There is a large hand-painted wooden sign that shows the numbers horse trails. Memorize it since the copies, if there are any, at he trail junctions are useless. Note also that there are many additional trails and roads that form loops and are not shown on any maps.

Exit the parking area on the trail to the left of the sign which should be Trail 2. Almost immediately you will be at an open field with no clues where to go. Walk straight across the field to the trail on the other side. At .5 miles you will cross East Trout Brook Road and immediately be confronted with three possible trails. Bear to the left and up the hill. At 1.0 mile there will be a trail junction which is almost a T with no signs. Turn right to continue with this description or left which is the "correct" way to go. Bearing left the trail ascends to the top of a little plateau with open forest. The trail heads southwest but then turns northwest and descends right back to East Trout Brook Road. Walk .8 miles down the road to Launt Pond. Although this is a road walk the pond is beautiful and well worth the trip. Launt Pond is not on any of the main trails but can be reached by spur trails. After spending some time at the pond, walk down the road about .3 miles to the next big parking area on the left. Just before the parking area enter the woods on Trail 11. Trail 11 winds back and forth but travels mostly east and up to meet Wilson Hollow Road which is part of Trail 2. Turn left or north and follow the wide road for about 1.2 miles at which point you will be within sight of Route 206. As you approach this area you will see a large clear cut area on the left. Turn left up the hill and make the first right. If this looks familiar, it should. This is the area where you made a short loop earlier. Head back to the parking area on Trail 2 which is only 1`.1 miles away. Other loops are possible using Trail 2 which extends much farther south.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Ridge LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.9 mi. 1447 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. At the top of the hill turn onto West Trout Brook Road and drive south a short distance to the large parking area on the left. Walk just less than a mile south on West Trout Brook Road and turn left onto the trail that runs over Fork Mountain. This is the central ridge of the three at the park and serves as part of the Finger Lakes Trail. The walk SSE on the trail for another 2.4 miles until Trail 4 turns left off the ridge. The walk along the ridge rolls some but does not gain or lose much elevation. Trail 4 is steep and drops 655 feet in less than a mile. The trail ends at East Trout Brook Road. Cross the road to the parking lot and then walk down the trail to Middle Pond. Approach Middle Pond quietly as you may spot a blue heron, a beaver or other wildlife. Walk straight ahead and up the hill on the trail. At 4.6 miles a trail appears on the left but you should continue up the hill to 4.9 miles where the trail splits. Notice the large clear cut area on the left as there are several in the area. Keep to the left to take the McCoy Hill Cutoff to the top of the eastern ridge. There is at least one viewpoint along the way and at 5.7 miles you will walk through a field to meet the trail along the eastern ridge. Turn left on this trail and walk along the ridge. At 6.0 miles a wide woods road heads back down off the ridge to East Trout Brook Road. Further along at 6.6 miles, another trail heads down to the camping area at Launt Pond. Continue straight ahead and at 7.2 miles another large clear cut area will appear on your right. Another clear cut is visible on the hillside across Route 206. At 7.8 miles turn right and walk up a short hill. Bear right at the first form and walk up a little and then down to East Trout Brook Road. The final .4 miles is uphill and crosses a large field before you are back at the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)



Bear Spring: Southeastern TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficulty 6.2 mi. 1475 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. This hike is the result of some wandering.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto East Trout Brook Road which is a paved road that connects to Trout Brook Road and Route 30 at Shinhopple. Drive south on the road for about 2.2 miles passing Launt Pond on your right. Park at the roadside pulloff near Middle Pond. There will be a dam and bridge at the outlet of the pond which will allow you to cross East Trout Brook. You may also drive north on Trout Brook Road from Route 30 in Shinhopple. Bear right where West and East Trout Brook Roads separate. The parking area will be about 2.2 miles from where the roads diverge. It may be possible to park at the large parking area where the two roads separate but crossing East Trout Brook in this area on Trail 8 can be difficult in all but the driest times. There is no bridge!

After crossing the bridge at Middle Pond turn right and follow Trail 8 as it roughly parallels the creek.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Southeastern Trails (clockwise)Trails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.8 mi. 1270 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. This hike is the result of some wandering.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto East Trout Brook Road which is a paved road that connects to Trout Brook Road and Route 30 at Shinhopple. Drive south on the road for about 2.2 miles passing Launt Pond on your right. Park at the roadside pulloff near Middle Pond. There will be a dam and bridge at the outlet of the pond which will allow you to cross East Trout Brook. Continue straight ahead and almost immediately start to climb the hill toward the McCoy Hill Cutoff. Ignore the side trails on the left and at .7 miles turn right where the trail splits. Follow the wide horse trail as it heads south while continuing to climb toward the ridge. The trail surface is very level which make sit easy to walk. At 1.2 miles the trail splits again. Stay to the right to continue east and southeast. At 1.4 mile follow the trail as it turns south and begins to snake along the ridge. At his point there is a "Danger! Keep Out!" sign on the trail straight ahead which is another good reason to turn right! After descending for a short distance, the trail again heads up the ridge and slightly to the east. At 2.1 miles you will still be headed south and will hit the highest point on the hike at 2300 feet. After the high point, start to descend and head southwest. At 2.5 mile you should pick up Finger Lakes Trail blazes as it comes up from East Trout Brook Road. Hike up the last hill in front of you and at 2.85 miles start a descent still heading south. At 3.2 miles turn sharply right or to the west and begin a .75 mile descent to East Trout Brook losing 625 feet in the process. Most of the trail down is old woods road or new logging road so the walk was pretty easy. The trail parallels a small stream. At 4 miles you will be in a field near East Trout Brook. You may turn right and follow the trail back to the car but it is often very wet. If you walk slightly to the left of the small pond, you can cross a bridge to East Trout Brook Road and hike back on the road. This is not quite as scenic as the trail but MUCH easier (an drier) walking. Walk the 1.7 miles back to the car gaining 300 feet in the process.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Trail 4Trails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 1.9 mi. 690 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY and watch for East Trout Brook Road on your left. Turn left on East Trout Brook Road heading south and passing Launt Pond on your right. After 2.2 miles park on the left side of the road in the parking area near Middle Pond. Cross the road and head up Trail 4 to the junction with Trail 5 on the ridge. UP is the operative word since Trail 4 is pro ably the steepest trail in the park. It only gains 690 feet but it does so in about 1 mile. Ignore the trail head signs that say .6 miles since a careful inspection will show this is "as the crow flies". The trail is steep with some very steep sections and near the top there is a switchback on the horse trail. Just before the junction with Trail 5 on the ridge is a sharp right turn. Once you are on top you can simply walk back to the car or make this part of a longer or MUCH longer loop.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Trout BrookTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.7 mi. 527 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY and watch for East Trout Brook Road on your left. Turn left on East Trout Brook Road heading south and passing Launt Pond on your right. After 2.2 miles park on the left side of the road in the parking area near Middle Pond. Walk down to the dam and then turn right on the trail. The trail parallels Trout Creek for most of its length but moves away through fields and forest in places. The trail can be very wet at times. Walk as far as you like and then turn around to return. There are a number of ways to extend the distance and difficulty of the hike.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Western LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.2 mi. 2100 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot.

Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn into the park on West Bear trout Brook Road which is the main entrance. Only a few hundred feet in there will be a large trail head parking area on the left. There is a large hand-painted wooden sign that shows the numbers horse trails. Memorize it since the copies, if there are any, at he trail junctions are useless. Note also that there are many additional trails and roads that form loops and are not shown on any maps.

Exit the parking area on the trail across the road which should be Trail 7. Within .5 miles you will cross Beers Brook Road and the trail continues on the other side as it parallels West Trout Brook Road. The trail is wide open and grassy and wanders back and forth across the ridge and generally gains a little elevation. At 1.1 miles the trail bears to the right and continues until it meets the trail to the Houck Mountain towers at about 2.2 miles. Turn left and walk a short distance to the next junction and turn right staying on the horse trail marked with the blue horse trail markers. There are few markers that designate the trail numbers and at some point Trail 7 changes to Trail 6 at least according to the sign back at trail head. As you walk along the ridge for the next 3.25 miles to the south and then southeast, you may begin to wonder if you are going the right way. At the and of the ridge the trail starts to descend for about .45 miles to a switchback almost 6 miles into the hike! After the switchback, walk about .8 miles to the next switchback and then another ,5 miles to West Trout Brook Road. You will be about 7.3 miles into the hike and will have dropped almost 1000 feet from the ridge. Cross the road and walk a little to the right to continue on Trail 6. Now its time to regain that 1000 feet you dropped!

From the road the trail ascends briefly and then drops through a stand of spruce trees before climbing again to a trail junction within .35 miles of the road. Finally a trail that is clearly marked! Turn left on Trail 5 and start to climb over 900 feet for the next 1.3 miles. After this there are still some ups and downs but the trail remains relatively flat as it passes Fork Mountain at 9.5 miles into the hike. At 10 miles the trail starts to descend. Along the trail at about 10.4 miles you will pass a clear cut area to the left of the trail. Somewhere around 11 miles Trail 5 ends at West Trout Brook Road. You can walk the road back to the car or cross over to get back on Trail 7 and retrace your earlier route back to the car which is only a mile away.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bearfort Ridge: Surprise Lake and West PondTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.94 mi 1140 ft GPSies

link to topo map

Park in the parking area on Route 210 just south of the New York border. Route 210 runs parallel to the western shore of Greenwood Lake and there are many marinas and boat ramps in the area. This parking area is hard to find as it looks like you are turning into the parking lot for one of the marinas on the side of the road away from the lake. From the parking area get on the blue State Line Trail and follow it up to the ridge. This area is popular and there may be no definite path defined. Keep watching for the trail markers as the trail ascends about 650 feet in the first .6 miles. This is almost a 20% grade and is a little steep. Near the top of the climb leave the State Line Trail and turn left on the yellow Ernest Walter Trail that travels along the ridge and to the shore of Surprise Lake where there is a nice viewpoint over the lake. Stay on the yellow trail as it descend some from the ridge and then climbs back to a lookout over West Pond about 1,5 miles into the hike. The trail can be wet at the lowest point of this descent at the end of Surprise Lake. Just after the viewpoint you will cross Green Brook and then turn almost due west off the trail to bushwhack to the highest point on the ridge which is Bearfort Mountain. There is no view from the summit so you can avoid this part if you are not completing a "list" of peaks. Back on the main trail there is an almost 180 degree turn as the trail begins to wrap around West Pond heading northeast. The trail continues almost flat as it follows the ridge line to a junction with the white Appalachian Trail at about 2.75 miles. Turn right on the AT and start to watch for the blue blazes of the State Line Trail on the right. Turn right at about 3 miles and descend almost 700 feet in the next .85 miles to return to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bearfort Ridge: Surprise Lake from Warwick TurnpikeTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.3 mi. 1000 ft. GPSies

link to topo map This trail follows Bearfort Ridge and leads to a secluded lake. The lookout from the ridge over Greenwood Lake is limited but nice. The route is challenging as it keeps the hiker on a spine of rock with many ups and downs.

Get on the Warwick-Greenwood Lake Turnpike. Near Greenwood Lake look for White Road that runs south. Just west of the intersection with White Road is a small parking area. If this lot is full there is another parking about a quarter mile west. Just out of the parking area there is a trail junction. Bear left on the white blazed Bearfort Ridge Trail and follow it as it ascends 630 feet in the next mile. Continue to follow the trail as it dips and rises along the ridge. Watch you footing on the rock spine that makes up most of this part of the trail At about 2.55 miles the trail meets the yellow Ernest Walter Trail. Turn right and walk to the shores of Surprise Lake for a nice view. Turn around and look for the orange blazes of the Quail Trail. This trail heads southwest and back to the car. It has its ups and downs for about a mile until at 4 miles it starts a serious downward trend. From here the trail drops over 500 feet in the last 1.3 miles until you are back at the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bearfort Ridge: Terrace Pond from Warwick TurnpikeTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.6 mi. 1000 ft. GPSies

link to topo map WARNING: This trail is closed as of July 2011 due to an expansion of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company's construction project. The new construction bisects the trail. Further construction may threaten even the AT in New Jersey!

This trail leads to a secluded glacial pond and the lookout from the ridge over Greenwood Lake is excellent. The New York City skyline is visible from the highest point. The route is challenging as it keeps the hiker on a spine of rock with many ups and downs and has several STEEP climbs.

Get on the Warwick-Greenwood Lake Turnpike. Near Greenwood Lake look for White Road that runs south. About a quarter mile west of the intersection and up the hill is a small parking area that is more of a pulloff on the north side of the road. Park here and walk across the road to get on the blue Terrace Pond North Trail. The first part of this trail runs through private property and the owners have been kind enough to allow access. For about a mile the trail ascends and the descends. Watch for an almost 90 degree right turn around 1 mile after which the trail drops slightly. In this area you will eventually start to walk UP a power line right-of-way. There are great views to the south and east along the way and the view ahead of what you are going to climb is impressive. In a short .2 miles the trail climbs about 250 feet which is close to a 30% grade! After this, the trail levels off and at 1.6 miles turns sharply off the power line and into the woods. The trail continues up slightly as it follows spines of rock until it meets the white Terrace Pond Circular Trail at about 2.1 miles. Walk to the cliffs on the south shore of the pond for a beautiful view. Above and behind you is an even higher area. This is Bearfort Mountain which is the highest point in Passaic County. You can take the short bushwhack to the summit. There are several informal paths to follow. To get back you may continue around the pond on the Circular Trail or simply retrace the path you took to the pond.If you choose to go around the pond, be aware that the east end can be very wet.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Beaver Dam Road to Ryan RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.6 mi. 1615 ft. GPSies

Follow Route 30 into Middleburgh and turn right to head east on Route 145 to Cotton Hill Road just outside of town. Turn left on Cotton Hill Road and drive 8.3 miles to Route 443, the Helderburg Trail. Make a right and drive about 6 miles to East Berne and make a left onto Route 157A. In 2.5 miles turn right on Braver Dam Road and drive about 1.3 miles to where the Long Path crosses the road at the southern boundary of Thacher Park just passed a gated woods road. Park on the left side of the road where there is room for several cars. Head into the woods to the trail. Thacher Park has its own trail system and the Long Path is co-aligned with these trails. The blazes in the park are in good shape and you should be able to follow them without any trouble. A blue trail parallels Beaver Dam Road and the aqua blazes indicate a left turn. Within a few hundred feet the trail turns right onto a woods road and continues to follow a series of woods roads downhill until about .9 miles where it makes a sharp right turn. After the right turn, you will be headed east and walking over a small hill. There are several seasonal streams along the way. At 1.5 miles the trail turns almost 180 degree and starts to head north. It passes behind the maintenance sheds and near the Knowles Flats picnic area before crossing Thacher Park Road (Route 157) at 1.7 miles. After crossing the road there is an overlook with incredible views to the north and east. Often vultures and raptors can be seen floating on the air currents. Walk along the lookout from one end to the other to a well-packed trail along the edge of the escarpment. There are limited views through the bushes but none better than at the overlook. You will soon break out into an open field near the Minelot parking area. Continue along the escarpment to the southern end of the Indian Ladder Trail at about 2.3 miles. The Long Path continues along the edge of the escarpment. The Indian Ladder Trail below closes in the early fall so it is an optional route. You may decide to do the Indian Ladder Trail on the way out or the way back. Continue north on the escarpment trail following the aqua blazes. On your way north you will cross two intermittent streams. Pass the northern end of the Indian Ladder Trail at 2.75 miles and continue to follow the blazes to a parking area and across the main entrance road and booth. On the other side there is an open area and it may be hard to spot where the blazes. Bear to the left toward the woods as the trail entered the trees. In this area the Long Path is on more of a trail but than woods road but it is still easy to follow. Along the way you can glimpse several more parking lots and picnic areas on the right. At 3.1 miles the trail emerges from the trees, passes along Hailes Cave Road and then re-enters the woods. At 3.4 miles you will cross an access road by a large pavilion. Walk out and across Hailes Cave Road where there is a nice picnic area and some more goods views. Retrace your steps to the Long path to continue your hike. Pass through a field and as you enter the woods notice the signs warning of fissures in the woods and on the trail ahead. The area around the park lies primarily on a limestone bedrock which is easily eroded by acid in the water. At 4 miles make a right onto a woods road and pass from the state park into land owned by the Open Spaces Institute. To the left is a large open area with a woods road. Begin a steep but short ascent as the trail switchbacks up to the ridge. At 4.2 miles make a sharp left following the blazes and at 4.35 miles there will be a yellow blazed trail that leads out to Ryan Road. Turn around and retrace your route back to the northern end of the Indian Ladder Trail. Turn left at 5.7 miles to take the lower trail. The limestone is rich in Devonian fossils which can be hard to see if you stay on the trail as requested. The trail can get very busy and patience is needed to negotiate the narrow walkway. There are some "caves" and underground streams along the way. Near the end is Minelot Falls which cascades off the escarpment to the trail below when there is enough water. There are two overhangs on this trail which require a little crouching to get through. At the top of the southern stairs turn left and retrace your steps back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Beaverkill Headwaters from Wild Meadow RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.7 mi. 643 ft. GPSies

link to topo map As you walk the first part of this route you will hear the waters of Fall Brook flowing roughly south. Once you get to the wetlands near the end the water will start to flow west with water feeding in from runoff from Doubletop. The headwaters of the Beaverkill are a little further north on the slopes of this mountain. The trail where it meets the Beaverkill has been eroded and crossing can be challenging even in drier weather.

Park at the end of Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) in the snowplow turnaround as long as there is no snow! Walk down the road which serves as the beginning of the yellow Neversink Hardenburgh Trail in this area. Walk by the hunting camp and continue on the trail on the other side. The trail can be very wet in places. Cross over a brook and head up a little gaining some elevation. The Fall Brook lean-to is about 1.7 miles into the hike. After passing the lean-to, a swampy area appeared on the right of the trail which leads into a series of beaver ponds and beaver meadows. Doubletop Mountain is in the background. This area is the headwaters of Fall Brook which runs south and the Beaverkill which runs north and west. The trail parallels the Beaverkill for a short distance and then ENDS at the edge of the stream. Linger for some time to take some pictures and dip a toe in one of the best trout streams in the United States. When you are done, turn around and retrace your route to the car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Beebe Hill Fire TowerTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 1.7 mi. 400 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Beebe Hill State Forest is on Route 22 in Austerlitz. Turn north on Osmer Road and drive about 1.6 miles to BarrettPond on the left. The access road to the trailhead is just north of the pond. After parking you may walk through the gate and use the road to the fire tower. You may also use the trail to the left of the information kiosk. The trail is marked with a sign that says "Fire Tower 1 mile" although the distance is shorter. The trail crosses two bridges over small streams on its way to the tower. The first half mile has a few steep sections but it switches back and forth several times. After .5 miles or so you will be on the flat top of the hill and a lean-to will appear on the left. Continue to the end of the trail. There you will find an observer's cabin, another building and the tower. The tower can be climbed and the cab is open all year round. Despite the fact that the hill rises only about 300 feet there are great views in all directions. The best views are to the west where the Catskills can easily be seen.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Belleayre Mt: Ski Area from Lost CloveTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.7 mi. 2245 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Get on Route 47, the road that runs from Big Indian on Route 28 to Claryville. Turn onto Lost Clove Road just outside the village of Big Indian. Continue for 1.5 miles on Lost Clove Road until the designated parking area on the right. The road dead ends just after this. Walk straight ahead from the parking area onto the red blazed trail. This trail is an easement on private land so stay on the trail at all times. The trail climbs 1300 feet in the next 1.3 miles! It is very steep at times and just steep at others. The trail does follow an old woods road for most of its length which makes the going easier. Some areas have loose stone which makes the footing tricky.

After 1.3 miles the trail enters the forest preserve and shortly after that ends at the blue blazed Pine Hill West Branch Trail. Turn left on this trail. The walking gets easier and a lean-to will be on the right after only .3 miles. Continue passed the lean-to for about .5 miles to the summit of Belleayre Mountain. At this point the Pine Hill West Branch trail turns south toward Balsam Mountain. Walk over the summit, through the field and slightly to your right, and pick up the red blazed Belleayre Ridge Trail. After about .3 miles, there is another lean-to on the right. Just before the lean-to the Cathedral Glen Trail turns to the right. This trail leads down through the ski slopes to the railroad tracks in Pine Hill.

Continue straight ahead on the Belleayre Ridge Trail. The signs for the various ski slopes will start to appear and then ahead will be the lifts and Sunset Lodge. You can continue straight ahead and walk all the way out to Deer Run, the last lift and ski slope on the ridge. Along the way enjoy the view down the slopes into the valley and across to the opposite hills. Be sure to walk around to the "front" of the lodge which offers a nice view of Balsam Mountain. return be retracing the path you used to ascend the mountain.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left is the vertical profile for the out and back hike.)


Bellvale Mt: Mt Peter to Bellvale MtTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.5 mi. 987 ft. GPSies

link to topo map To park for this hike travel on Route 17A from Warwick to Greenwood Lake or vice versa. A little less than two miles north of the intersection of Routes 17A and 210 in Greenwood Lake there is a pulloff at the top of the hill on the south side near some rundown buildings. Park here but watch for broken glass! You may also see the white signs or blazes for the AT as it crosses the road here. Find the trail and start to walk southwest on the AT. This route starts at Mt. Peter near Warwick, NY and travels southwest paralleling Greenwood Lake. The ridge is rugged but the elevation profile accentuates the small ups and downs and makes it look far worse than it is. It part of the AT that runs along Bellvale Ridge until it gets to Bellvale Mountain. Through hikers on the AT are often found here during the summer. There are at lead four good viewpoints along the ridge that look east and south across Greenwood Lake. Bellvale Mountain is a good point for the hiker without a car spot to turn around and hike back to the car. You may continue on the trail down a steep descent and go as far as you like. One objective would be a hike around Surprise Lake but this will add over 5 miles to the hike!

(The map above shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)

link to topo profile
(The image above is the vertical profile for the out and back hike.)


Bellvale Mt: NYNJ Border to Village VistaTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.3 mi. 1670 ft. GPSies

link to topo map To park for this hike travel on Route 17A from Warwick to Greenwood Lake. At the bottom of the hill stay right on Route 210 through the village of Greenwood Lake. Route 210 travels along the west shore of the lake and heads toward New Jersey. Watch for a sign that says "Welcome to New Milford Township". Just before the sign turn up the driveway to the trailhead parking. Try to park so that you do not block any of the boats from the marina that shoes the parking area. Head out on the blue State Line Trail which seems to be quite popular as the ground is well-packed. In addition, people have walked off the trail wherever they want which makes the main trail hard to follow. The trail blazes can also be confusing so watch the paint very carefully. After wandering along the base of the ridge to the west for about a quarter of a mile the trail turns right or northwest and starts up the ridge. Although there are some switchbacks along the way, there are also some steep sections. The sidetracks continue to be a problem as are the faded blazes. Some parts of the trail are packed dirt but there are several sections with a lot of rocks which makes walking harder. Over the next .8 miles you will gain 650 feet to the top of the ridge. At the top of the ridge an SL sign is painted on the rocks. Turn right to get on the AT and head northeast. At 1.5 miles, you will ascend to Prospect Rock which has a flag on top. Prospect Rock is the highest point on the AT in New York state. Continue on your way from the top of Prospect Rock as the trail descends for the next .9 miles. Sometimes you will be walking along the knife edge of rock outcrops while other times you will be in the shade of pine trees with over soft, marshy ground. At 2.4 miles begin to ascend Bellvale Mountain. The ascent is .4 miles and gains about 200 feet. Along the way you will encounter several rock scrambles. One ascent is nearly vertical and has an aluminum ladder tethered to the rock face. If you are hiking with a dog, I can only tell you that Sheila made it with no problem! At the top of the climb you will be on Bellvale Mountain. Continue along the ridge as the trail repeatedly descends and ascends with open rock faces and dark stretches through the evergreens. Some ascents are steep although brief. There are several large rock cairns along the way. After a little more than 2 miles you will arrive at the Village Vista trail 4.9 miles into the hike. Turn right onto the Village Vista which starts out almost level but changes immediately as it begins to descend to the lake. There were several switchbacks but the grade is still challenging and would be more so on the ascent. The "vista" is disappointing as most of the view is blocked by trees. Continue down the trail from the vista as it become steeper and rockier. Where the trail is not rocky it can be dusty which makes getting a good grip difficult. You will eventually break out into a sand and gravel yard almost at the bottom of the ridge. The trail turns left onto a road but then immediately turns right turned back into the woods briefly until it comes out onto some local streets. you will be about 5.7 miles into the hike. Follow the streets out to Route 210. which has pretty good shoulder for walking. Route 210 is flat and level compared to the ridge with only few hills that are easily negotiated. The house numbers decrease as you approach the state border. After walking another 3.6 miles, the sign for the marina will come into view. Turn right to walk up to the car.
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(The image at the above is the vertical profile for the out and back hike.)

Berme Road to Berrypickers PathTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.8 mi 445 ft GPSies

link to topo map Take Route 52 through Ellenville heading east over the mountain. Just before the road began its trip up the mountain, turn left on Berme Road and drive about 4 miles to where the Long Path crosses the road. There is room for one or two cars to park on the side of the road. Follow the aqua blazes through hardwood forests consisting mostly of oak trees. The trail is pretty easy to follow as it uses woods roads and is pretty well marked. At .7 miles turn left on another woods road which is also marked as the Lower Mine Hole Trail coming up from Foordmore Road. The trail is rocky and layers of oak leaves can make it slippery underfoot. The trail heads south and continues climbing toward the ridge. At about 1.4 miles the trail turns west to avoid some ledges and then turns south again. At an elevation of about 1230 feet the typical Sam's Point and Shawangunk vegetation appears. There are now open rock faces with scrub pine and the transition is sudden and stunning. Keep looking back over your shoulder as viewpoints begin to appear. From some lookouts you can see the valley below and the mountains of the Catskills beyond to the north. Keep an eye out for the side trail on the right to Jacob's Ladder which you may want to visit. Also watch for a path on the left to Panther Rock which is a great lookout. The trail is marked with a sign saying "Panther Rock" and is blazed in white. It is only a few hundred feet out to Panther Rock but it is certainly worth the trip. Climb up to the top of Panther Rock and find views similar to other viewpoints but unobstructed and more expansive. Continue heading southwest and climbing. Just after Panther Rock descend a little and cross a stream before climbing again. At 3.4 miles you will hit the Smiley Carriageway. Turn left and walk to the beginning of the Berrypickers Trail which is only about a quarter mile away. Once you are at the beginning of the Berrypickers Path, head back down along the same path you used on the way up.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route as an out-and-back.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Berme Road to Lundy QuarryTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.8 mi 445 ft GPSies

link to topo map Take Route 52 through Ellenville heading east over the mountain. Just before the road began its trip up the mountain, turn left on Berme Road and drive about 4 miles to where the Long Path crosses the road. There is room for one or two cars to park on the side of the road. Cross Berme Road and walk down the bank until you spot a Long Path marker on the old D and H Canal towpath below. Follow the towpath as it parallels Berme Road. The trail is often filled with garbage and walking on the road may be preferable! At about .5 miles the towpath turns into Towpath Road which crosses Port Ben Road. Towpath Road leads back to Port Ben Road and crosses Rondout Creek on a very old metal bridge. Port Ben Road stretches out ahead passing between two fields. Walk for .7 miles on Port Ben Road to the point were it ends on Route 209. Route 209 is a busy road but it had a sidewalk on the near side so turn right and walk a short distance to Lundy Road. Turn left and head generally northwest as Lundy Road begins a very gentle ascent following the Vernooy Kill. You can hear and see various rapids on the creek. Lundy Road very quickly turns to a gravel surface but there is almost no traffic. At 2.1 miles there is an interesting waterfall caused by what looks like an old dam across the stream. At 2.4 miles into the hike there is another small waterfall. The road continues to gain some elevation and at 2.8 miles pass Cutler Road on the left. The long range plans for the Long Path include taking the trail off Lundy Road at this point and continuing along the Vernooy Kill to the falls. In a few hundred feet the quarry will be on the right side of the road at 2.9 miles. Return the way you came.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route as an out-and-back.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Big Pocono: North and South TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.9 mi. 1300 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Big Pocono State Park near Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania is also the home of Camelback Mountain Ski Resort. There are nice views especially from the Indian Trail but the trails are poorly marked. There is a "healthy timber rattlesnake population" in the park. Those not wishing to hike to the top of the mountain may drive there to enjoy the views. The easiest way to get to the trailhead is to take I80 to exit 45. Drive south on Route 715 and turn right on Railroad Drive. Drove 1.2 miles to the trailhead which is marked with a sign indicating "Riday Gate" and an arrow showing "Big Pocono State Park". You may park near the gate on the right side of the road where there is room for two or three cars. There is also a spot on the opposite side of the road for about the same number of vehicles. The first part of the trail is an old railroad grade and is easy to spot. The railroad bed is well maintained, flat and smooth. In several places the trail passes through small rock cuts. As you near the spot where the trail turns up the mountain the railroad bed is built up to span a gully. At 1.3 miles the trail turns off the railroad bed and heads up the mountain in a sharp switchback. Continue to walk straight ahead to investigate the railroad cut through the rocks. This cut is more expansive than the others. Return to the trail and begin to climb the mountain. The trails are not very well marked and branch in several places. Sometimes to get to one trail you have to hike part of the way on another. The blazes are not clear and the railroad bed does not have any but they are not really necessary as it is easy to follow. At just over 1.6 miles pass a small pond off the trail on the left and then continue to follow the trail as it turns and continues to climb to a junction at 1.9 miles. Turn to the right on the North Trail which is sheltered by trees but offered no views at all. The trail does offer a pretty steep climb gaining over 600 feet in about .75 miles to Rim Road on the summit. Along the way there are several intersections with paths and trails which were quite confusing as there were no signs. Keep bearing right in each case. At one point you will come to the edge of one of the ski slopes with a limited view. At 3.1 miles intersect Rim Road and cross it into a parking lot. The trail continues straight ahead. You may ant to detour to the left and walk to the edge of the parking lot to get a view to the south and east. Walk back to where the trail crossed the road and hike .2 miles to a parking area at the top of the mountain at about 3.4 miles. A radio tower is to the left and with the old park office building next to it. To the right is an open space where a lookout tower once stood. It is still marked as present on many maps. Take some time to walk around the area and take in the views. Watch for a sign that explains that the park has a "healthy population of timer rattlesnakes". Walk over toward the bathrooms and find a round "table". The table is stainless steel with a stone mosaic on the surface. There is a large arrow and the names of various landmarks. When the opposite end of the arrow encircles the name of a landmark, the other end of the arrow points to that landmark. It is very interesting to see that it is an Eagle Scout project. Head south just passed the bathrooms and down to a parking area to pick up the South Trail for the return trip. At the parking area, turn to the right and exit the lot. Cross Rim Road and find the Vista Trail that connects to the South Trail. The trail was very short. When you hit the South Trail you may want to turn right to investigate a little but there are no views in this direction. To the left of the terminus of the Vista trail is a...vista. with limited views to the south. Continue on the South Trail which for the first half mile is flat or a little uphill. At about 4.9 miles begin the descent back to the car. The trail is very rocky and there are several switchbacks. Switchbacks are a blessing and a curse as they mitigate the steep grades but lengthen the hike. At the end of the third switchback your car is only .3 miles away but the terrain is very steep and may contain some of those rattlesnakes. As it is that .3 miles turns into a 2.4 mile walk! As you descend you will come to a junction with the Indian Trail where you should continue to follow the South Trail back to the point where you turned right onto the North Trail earlier. Walk down to the railroad cut and turned right to follow the railroad bed back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Big Pond: Around the PondTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.8 mi. 750 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the junction of Beaverkill Road and Barkaboom Road. Turn left toward the Little Pond Campgrounds. Continue passed the turn to the campgrounds on the left. Watch for a sign for the parking area for Big Pond on the right. If you get to Big Pond, you should turn around and take the first turn on the left! Park in the parking area and look for the trail register. The trail is poorly marked in places so keep an eye out for the trail markers at all times. When thee trail ahead starts the first climb turn off to the left and begin to bushwhack around the pond. On the north end and west side you will find some woods roads that lead out to Barkaboom Road. You may walk the road back to the car or walk back into the woods.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the Barkaboom and Beaverkill Roads.)


Big Pond to Alder LakeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.3 mi. 1530 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the junction of Beaverkill Road and Barkaboom Road. Turn left toward the Little Pond Campgrounds. Continue passed the turn to the campgrounds on the left. Watch for a sign for the parking area for Big Pond on the right. If you get to Big Pond, you should turn around and take the first turn on the left! Park in the parking area and look for the trail register. The trail is poorly marked in places so keep an eye out for the trail markers at all times. There are some short climbs but the trail skirts most of the tops of the hills. Once you get to Alder Creek Road you may turn around or extend the hike by walking over to Alder Lake. You may even decide to walk around the lake and beyond!

(The map above shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the Barkaboom and Beaverkill Roads.)


Big Pond to Alder Lake (complete)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.7 mi. 1530 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Drive north on Old Route 17 from Livingston Manor toward Roscoe. Turn right on Beaverkill Road and head toward Lew Beach. Drive through the hamlet of Lew Beach and continue on to Turnwood. As the Beaverkill Road makes a turn to the right, continue straight ahead on Barkaboom Road toward Big Pond. After less than a mile, turn right into the upper parking area for Big Pond and park in the lot.The trail starts by the trail register in the upper right corner of the lot. Although the trail has several ups and downs, it is sited so that it travels around the higher ridges in the area and sticks to the lower spots on the shoulders of those ridge. Just after the start of the hike begin to ascend along a woods road and continue to walk uphill through a pine forest. The trail had not been maintained for some years but in the Fall of 2015 a group from the Catskill Mountain Club worked on it to put it in good shape. Parts of the trail may have nettles and briars which grow quickly in season. There may be a few large blowdowns but these are usually easy to avoid or easy to climb over. At about a mile begin to descend on another woods road to an area that was once a small pond but is now mostly wetlands. Along the way note the many stonewalls and a few foundations in the area. At 1.75 miles there is a small stream which dries up rather quickly as it connects two wetland areas. Cross the stream and begin to ascend to the shoulder of another ridge from the low wetlands. At 2.2 miles the trail turns right heading east toward Alder Lake. Shortly after that begin to descend for .6 miles to Alder Creek. Cross Alder Creek which may be as easy as simply walking across in the dry seasons or may require you to look for some stepping stones when there has been a heavy rain. Cross Alder Creek Roadand continue straight ahead toward the lake on the access road. Walk through the parking area passing the remains of the Coykendall Mansion> After taking a look at the lake from the "lawn" turn around and retrace your route back to the Big Pond Parking area. Big Pond is several hundred feet below Alder Lake in elevation so the return trip may seem easier.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the Barkaboom and Beaverkill Roads.)


Big Pond to Cabot Mt (road loop)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.0 mi. 1605 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd for less than a mile and park at the forest preserve parking area. Walk down the access road and up Barkaboom Road for a short distance. The trail begins on the left and this is where the register is located. In the summer of 2006, there was a sign warning that the trail was closed at the other end. After bushwhacking the Catskill 35's, I didn't think this would be much of a problem and I never found the "closed" trail. After another .75 miles, you reach the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn right and stay on the red blazed trail. After .5 miles this intersects with the yellow blazed Little Pond Trail. Stay on the red trail and get ready to climb! Cabot Mt is only 2970' high but the ascent is somewhat steep. The Beaverkill Vista gives a beautiful if somewhat restricted view of the Beaverkill valley. Turn around and descend Cabot. This time turn left on the Little Pond Trail which leads to the campground access road. Follow this road out to the bathrooms and main buildings. At this point you may take the blue Campground Trail 1.15 miles until it meets the red Touch-Me-Not Trail. Retrace your steps back to your car at Big Pond. You may also walk .85 miles out the Little Pond Campgrounds access road and turn left on Barkaboom Road. After .5 miles you will be back at the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Cabot Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the access road and Barkaboom Road.)


Big Pond to Cabot Mt (trail loop)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.6 mi. (east side of Little Pond)
6.6 mi. (west side of Little Pond)
2260 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd for less than a mile and park at the forest preserve parking area. Walk down the access road and up Barkaboom Road for a short distance. The trail begins on the left and this is where the register is located. In the summer of 2006, there was a sign warning that the trail was closed at the other end. After bushwhacking the Catskill 35's, I didn't think this would be much of a problem and I never found the "closed" trail. After another .75 miles, you reach the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn right and stay on the red blazed trail. After .5 miles this intersects with the yellow blazed Little Pond Trail. Stay on the red trail and get ready to climb! Cabot Mt is only 2970' high but the ascent is somewhat steep. The Beaverkill Vista gives a beautiful if somewhat restricted view of the Beaverkill Valley with Little Pond below. Turn around and descend Cabot. Turn right on the Little Pond Trail which leads to the campgrounds. Along the way there is a nice viewpoint about a quarter mile after the trail junction. The field has an old foundation and a small pond. I always think this would be a great place to have a cabin except for the long hike to get there! As you descend from this viewpoint there may be a few small streams to cross. There is also a beaver meadow on the left of the trail. When you get to the Loop Trail around Little Pond, you may turn left or right. Turning to the right allows you to circle Little Pond and adds .2 miles to the trip. Follow the loop trail to the bathrooms and main buildings. At this point find the blue Campground Trail behind the bathrooms. This trail is steep in places as it climbs back up TouchMeNot Mountain for about 1.15 miles until it meets the red Touch-Me-Not Trail. Turn right and retrace your steps back to your car at Big Pond. From the bathrooms you may also walk .85 miles out the Little Pond Campgrounds access road and turn left on Barkaboom Road. After .5 miles you will be back at the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Cabot Mountain.)


Big Pond to Little Pond (road loop)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.8 mi. (west side of Little Pond) 997 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd for less than a mile and park at the parking area near Big Pond. Walk across the road to the where the trail starts just north of the parking area. The first part of the trail is an old woods road and it is pretty easy to follow. The trail register is a short distance off the road. The first mile of the trail gains about 775 feet with an average grade of 15%. Some places are almost flat which means there are a few steeper places. The blazing of the trail has been extremely poor with most blazes placed too far apart. None of the turns are properly marked. When there is no snow on the ground the trail is usually easy to spot. In a few places the trail travels along the side of the hill and this can make for some tricky footing when the trail is wet or snow covered. This trail also can be covered in nettles when they are in season. The highest point on the trail is the shoulder of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. After a slight descent turn right on the yellow loop trail around Little Pond. The loop trail is very popular with campers during the season but the marking is no better than the trail from Big Pond. At 1.6 miles you will have descended through some interesting rock formations and be at the cutoff to Cabot Mountain. Continued your hike by bearing left to stay on the loop trail. At 1.8 miles you will arrive in the clearing that acts as a viewpoint. It is hard to see Little Pond from this lookout since the trees have grown up. There is also a small foundation of a long-forgotten homestead cabin. Continue to walk out a woods road from the clearing now heading south and in a few hundred feet turn left to head south to the northern shore of Little Pond. At the pond turn right to walk around the western shore of Little Pond. The view of the pond from the boat launch area is very nice with Touch-Me-Not Mountain directly across the water. Watch for a trail that turns left off the campsite road and heads to the bridge at the outlet of Little Pond. Cross the bridge and walk to the parking area. Turn right and walk on the road to the gatehouse. Walk a little less than a mile down to Barkaboom Road and turn left to hike up the road back to Big Pond where your car is parked.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the shoulder of Touch-Me-Not Mountain.)


Big Pond to Touchmenot MtTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.4 mi. 916 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd for less than a mile and park at the forest preserve parking area. Walk down the access road and up Barkaboom Road for a short distance. The trail begins on the left and this is where the register is located. In the summer of 2006, there was a sign warning that the trail was closed at the other end. After bushwhacking the Catskill 35's, I didn't think this would be much of a problem and I never found the "closed" trail. After another .75 miles, you reach the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn right and stay on the red blazed trail. After .5 miles this intersects with the yellow blazed Little Pond Trail. Stay on the red trail and get ready to climb! Cabot Mt is only 2970' high but the ascent is somewhat steep. The Beaverkill Vista gives a beautiful if somewhat restricted view of the Beaverkill valley. Turn around and descend Cabot. This time turn left on the Little Pond Trail which leads to the campground access road. Follow this road out to the bathrooms and main buildings. At this point you may take the blue Campground Trail 1.15 miles until it meets the red Touch-Me-Not Trail. Retrace your steps back to your car at Bog Pond. You may also walk .85 miles out the Little Pond Campgrounds access road and turn left on Barkaboom Road. After .5 miles you will be back at the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)


Black Rock Forest: Complete LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.4 mi. 2267 ft. GPSies

link to topo map From the south, get on Route 9W on the west side of the Hudson River heading north from West Point toward Newburgh. From the junction with Route 293 near the Unites States Military Academy at West Point, drive 3.5 miles north on 9W. Look for Mountain Road and the Storm King School on your right. Turn onto Mountain Road and immediately make an almost 180 degree turn into the tunnel that passes back underneath Route 9W. Use CAUTION since the tunnel is VERY NARROW! Only one car can pass through at a time. Continue straight ahead on Reservoir Road until you get to the parking area on your right.

From the north, get on Route 9W south from Newburgh to West Point. From the junction with Interstate 84 in Newburgh , drive 8.5 miles south on 9W. Look for Old West Point Road on your right. Turn right onto Old West Point Road and follow it to the junction with Reservoir Road. Turn right and continue straight ahead on Reservoir Road until you get to the parking area on your right.

The trail and route description below are representative of the MANY variations you can use in this area. A combination of trails, woods roads and roads give the hiker an opportunity to custom tailor an outing.

Find the trailhead with maps and an overview of the area. Get on the red Duggan Trail and walk about .5 miles until it meets the blue Reservoir Trail. Turn left here and cross Ben's Bridge over the stream that is the outlet for the Upper Reservoir. Follow this trail for about .5 miles as it parallels the brook and climbs to the area near the Education Center. Passed the center the yellow trail begins to climb Mount Misery. Bear right onto White Oak Road and follow it .5 miles to the Aleck Meadow Reservoir. At the reservoir turn right and walk along the shore and across a small bridge just below the spillway. At this point you will be on the yellow Stillman Trail.

Follow the Stillman Trail for .5 miles as it ascends Black Rock. Follow the Stillman Trail for about .4 miles at which you will come to a confusing intersection of roads and trails with two separate gates. Stay on the Stillman Trail by passing through the first and second gates. Just after the second gate turn right. Continue on the Stillman Trail for 1.35 miles and watch for a white trail on the left. This is the Split Rock Trail. Turn left an follow this trail for .3 miles until it meets the Sutherland Road which travels in and east-west direction. Continue walking straight ahead on the Chatfield Road between the two ponds. After only about .15 miles turn right on the yellow Secor Trail. This trail joins with the blue Chatfield Trail in only about .25 miles.

Turn right on the Chatfield Trail and walk .3 miles to the white Scenic Trail. Stay on the Scenic Trail for .25 miles and watch for the blue Eagle Cliff Spur trail on the right. Walk a few hundred feet out to Eagle Cliff. Get on the red Rut Trail and walk .15 miles to the yellow Stropel Trail. Turn left and walk a few hundred feet back to the white Scenic Trail. Continue on this trail for .35 miles to the blue Spy Rock Spur Trail on the left. Walk a few hundred feet up to Spy Rock, look around and return. Walk for about .25 miles and turn left on Continental Road. About .5 miles up the Continental Road is the Chatfield Stone House. From here continue .1 miles on the road and turn right on the while White Oak Trail to the shores of Arthur's Pond.

Continue .15 miles across the outlet of Arthur's Pond and up a short hill to the yellow Tower Vue trail. Turn right here and walk .55 miles along the shore of the pond and back to the white Scenic Trail. Turn left and continue .2 miles on the trail which is also Bog Meadow road a this point. Turn right into the woods following the white Scenic trail as it heads south and the loops north and northeast again. After .5 miles and some climbing you will be at the top of Rattlesnake Hill. In another .7 miles you will crest Hill of Pines. After about .25 miles more you will cross the blue Swamp Trail and in only a few hundred feet the white Scenic trail ends at a junction with the yellow Stillman Trail. Turn right here to ascend .15 miles to the top of Mount Misery.

Descend .15 miles down Mount Misery and turn right on White Oak Road. In .17 miles you will be at the upper Reservoir. Turn left on Reservoir Road and walk .25 miles down to the Education Center. Another easy .55 miles on the road delivers you back to your car in the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Black Rock Forest: Black Rock Hollow LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.8 mi. 1180 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Black Rock Forest has many trails and roads. A map is essential to being able to navigate your way around this interesting but confusing maze. From the south, get on Route 9W on the west side of the Hudson River heading north from West Point toward Newburg. From the junction with Route 293 near the Unites States Military Academy at West Point, drive a little more than 4 miles north on 9W. Look for Mountain Road and the Storm King School on your right. The parking area is on the west side of the road about .7 miles passed the school. From the north, get on Route 9W on the west side of the Hudson River heading south toward West Point. From I84 it is just less than 8 miles to the parking area on the west side of Route 9W. The parking area is about a mile south of Angola Road. Pull over and park in the lot and start out on Peck's Road which has a gravel surface and is in great shape. For the first .6 miles stay on the road which has a very gradual uphill grade. When you reach the water filtration plant, the Black Rock Hollow Trail turns right off the road into the woods following and old woods road. The woods road is rocky and eroded in places but the trail is sited to avoid the worst spots. Over the next .9 miles gain almost 600 feet along a 12% grade with some steeper sections. At 1.5 miles there is a junction with the yellow Stillman Trail. Turn right to head toward Black Rock. Continue following the Stillman Trail northwest toward Black Rock. By the time you hit the highest point on Black Rock you will have gained another 260 feet in the .3 miles from the trail junction. The view from Black Rock is more than 180 degrees to the south, west and north. Look southwest or to the left to see a fire tower which is just a shell and closed to the public. To the northwest the Schunnemunk Ridge is prominent and with the Moodna Viaduct just below it. The viaduct was opened in 1909 and is still the longest and highest railroad trestle east of the Mississippi River! To the north is the Hudson River and the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge. Follow the Stillman Trail as it makes a steep descent and watch for the black deposits that give the rock its name. The descent isn't long but the first part is very steep. I have done this in the winter and spikes are almost a must if there is any ice or snow. At 2.3 miles turn left onto Continental Road and hike along the well groomed surface until you reach a large white oak tree at 2.6 miles. This tree seems to be in pretty good condition. Continue on a few hundred feet and turn left the white blazed White Oak Trail to Arthur's Pond. Continue on the trail as it crosses just below the spillway of the pond. After crossing the spillway, follow the White Oak Trail as it heads into the woods to the left. The trail comes to an end on White Oak Road. Turn right on the road and follow it as it passed along the shore of Aleck Meadow Reservoir. Continue to follow the road as it passes Aleck Meadow Reservoir and heads toward the Upper Reservoir. At the Upper Reservoir continue on Reservoir Road to the Mailey's Mill Bridge near the research center. At 4.5 miles turn left and cross over the bridge to the blue Reservoir Trail. The stream on the right once powered the mill. Continue on the trail crossing the stream on Ben's Bridge until the trail ends at the water filtration plant at 5.25 miles. Turn right on Peck's Road. From there it is only .6 miles downhill to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile
(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bramley Mountain (Glen Burnie Road)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.9 mi. 920 ft. GPSies

link to topo map From Delhi, NY head north and east on Route 10. In East Delhi cross the river at the Fitches Covered Bridge and turn left on County Route 18. After about 2 miles turn right on Glen Burnie Road and start to look for DEP signs. After a little over .5 miles there will be a woods road on the left with a gate and some room to pull over on the side of the road. DO NOT park here and take this road. Drive a little further and you will find found another woods road with another pulloff on the left. This woods road will lead almost directly to the summit of Bramley Mountain. Follow the road for about 1.1 miles and you will find that if you continue straight ahead the road will skirt the summit. You will have to bushwhack to your left to get to the summit. The prickers here can be rather thick at times! When you run into some cliffs find a way through them and walk the short distance to the summit. You will find the piers for the firetower are still in place and a USGS marker is located nearby. Walk south to s lookout with limited views. When you are ready, return the way you came.

(The map above shows the parking area and the one way hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bramley Mountain: New TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.7 mi. 950 ft. GPSies

link to topo map From Delhi, NY head north and east on Route 10. In East Delhi cross the river at the Fitches Covered Bridge and turn left on County Route 18. After about 2 miles turn right on Glen Burnie Road and start to look for DEP signs. After a little over .5 miles there will be a woods road on the left with a gate and some room to pull over on the side of the road. There is a trail kiosk near the gate. Park here to begin your hike with a choice of trails. The red Summit Trail goes to the right directly to the summit over 1.8 miles.The blue Quarry Trail goes straight ahead and passes through a quarry before wending its way to the summit over 2.1 miles. Walk straight ahead on the blue Quarry Trail which follows a woods road that is very open but can be damp and muddy in some places. At about .8 miles the trail passes through the quarry and splits with blue markers going both left and right. Head to the right as the trail enters the woods and immediately turns almost 180 degrees. The trail alternates between paralleling the ridge and then heading up the mountain several times before making the final ascent. Eventually the trail turns and begins a steady climb up to the summit. It passes by several interesting ledges and rock formations. There are numerous switchbacks which make the walk longer but mitigate some of the steeper climbs. Near the top the trail passes around and through some rock ledges and the trail crew has expertly created some steps out of natural materials. Near the top at about 1.9 miles and just before the summit is a nice viewpoint with a stone bench. Turn left here and follow the trail too the summit which is only a few hundred feet away. Over the 1.1 miles from the quarry the trail gains 770 feet with and overall average grade of 13% despite the many switchbacks. At the summit you will notice the concrete pilings for the fire tower. There is also a lookout to the south and southeast and the Pisgahs near Andes are clearly visible. They were once the site of a ski area. Return to the summit and walk in the direction that the arrow points to follow markers for the red Summit Trail that will return you to the parking area. The Summit Trail starts out as wide woods road but at .15 miles from the summit markers clearly indicate a right turn. The trail follows another woods road that is more open but is often covered in long grass. On the Wat Wong the ridge there is a nice view off to the left. Continue to follow the woods road as it entered the woods. As the trail approaches the road it turns right and enters the woods to start downhill to the car. This part of the trail is soft and easy walking but only lasts .15 miles until you are back at the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the one way hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Brock Mountain to Berry Brook RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.4 mi. 1824 ft. GPSies

link to topo map This is a one way hike that requires a car shuttle or you will have to double the distance. Another option is to have someone pick you up at the other end. Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. Turn right on Berry Brook Road just after the county line and drive for around 8 miles to the trail head parking on the right. Drop one car here and continue on Berry Brook Road to Route 30 on the Pepacton Reservoir. Turn left and continue around the reservoir to the junction with Route 206/Route 7. Turn left and drive 2.2 miles to a small parking area on the right side of the road. Park here and cross the road to pick up the blue-blazed Campbell Mountain Trail.

The trail is a wide woods road at the beginning and stays this way for most of its length. There is an immediate ascent through hardwood forest. Hiking this trail can be a real pain or a great pleasure depending on the trail maintenance. This trail is part of the Finger Lakes Trail system and is maintained by their volunteers. Blowdowns can be a problem but the bigger problem is the dense stands of prickers that can obscure the trail. For the first .5 miles the trail gains 450 feet with a few short but steep climbs. After that, it goes through the first of several switchbacks to give hikers a rest before gaining another 230 feet over the next .4 miles. At about 1 mile you reach the false summit of Brock Mountain which, on many maps and GPS units, is marked as Brock Mountain. In this area you may begin to notice piles of rock that do not look natural> There is a rather large quarry off the trail to the left. You may be able to find a woods road that leads to it but the bushwhack is easy. You will see piles of rock and a large and deep pit. When you have explored, work your way back up out of the pit and back to the trail. Back on the trail it is time to tackle the rest of the ascent up the "real" Brock Mountain. After a slight descent from the false summit, the trail ascends about 300 feet to the top of Brock Mountain at about 1.9 miles into the hike. The trail does not actually pass over the highest point on the mountain where there is purported to be a USGS benchmark but it tops out at about 2440 feet. As you start down the other side of Brock Mountain there will be a rather steep descent. Many of the trees are dead and this allows for some interesting views of the valley with another ridge beyond. Continue the hike over trail but be careful to pay close attention to where you are hiking! There are numerous paths and woods roads that cut across the main trail and the trail markers can be few and far between. At about 2.4 miles the trail heads north and then southeast after a short distance. This prominent switchback is not shown on the NYNJTC maps and can be a little confusing. At 3 miles the trail turns almost 90 degrees to the right and heads northeast. Shortly after this, at 3.3 miles, there is another 90 degrees turn to the right and the trail heads southeast. In both cases there are snowmobile trails or woods roads in the area of the turns. There are really no views along the way but the woods can be pretty in any season. In some places there are stone walls and the hint of a foundation. At 3.85 there is another 90 degree turn to the right onto an old road which is eroded but very recognizable with stone walls on both sides. The is a slight uphill but the trail is mostly level for the next .3 miles. At this point the Campbell Mountain Trail ends. To the right is the Little Spring Brook Trail that leads out to Route 206. Turn left onto the Pelnor Hollow Trail. In the next 1 mile the trail climbs over 400 feet through mixed hardwood and evergreen forest. There are some steeper climbs in places along this stretch. Near the top of this climb the trail levels and your reward is the Split Rock Lookout. At the lookout there is a large boulder and an area where part of the bedrock has separated. The views to the west are very good but there isn't much to see other than trees and mountains except for one house on the far ridge. The lookout is about 5.2 miles into the hike. From the lookout the trail ascends for about .1 miles at a 26% grade. This isn't very far but it looks like a WALL from the bottom. At 5.3 miles, turn left on the red Mary Smith Trail as the Pelnor Hollow Trail continues straight ahead. The Mary Smith Trail is an almost continuous downhill to Berry Brook Road. There are a few tricky descent through rocks and around trees. After 1.1 miles and a drop of over 500 feet you should be back at the car. When you come out of the woods and cross the power line right-of-way, watch for the point where the trail reenters the woods on the other side.

(The map above shows the parking area and the one way hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Budd Lake Fire TowerTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty .7 mi 115 ft GPSies

link to topo map

From Route 46 in Budd Lake, NJ take Sand Shore Road north along the east shore of Budd Lake for a little more than 1.5 miles. Turn right on Fire Tower Road. Where Fire Tower Road crosses Lozier Road continue straight across. When the road branches follow the right fork and park at the dead end. Be sure to leave space for vehicles to pass through the gate especially during times of high fire alert. Walk north along the road for about .35 miles to the tower. Take some pictures and then retrace your path back to the car. Budd Lake is the largest fresh water lake in New Jersey so it may be worthwhile to visit the tower during a high fire alert so that you mat climb the tower with permission from the observer.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Burnt KnobTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.8 mi 1330 ft GPSies

link to topo map Park at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the right. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. After a short walk, re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the Trail for about 1.1 miles. Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains. This walk winds its way upward through mixed hardwood and spruce forest until it meets the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail.

When the streams are running high, you may be unable to make the second crossing after the bridge without running the risk of getting very wet at the beginning of the hike! The map shown was created at such a time. It shows a bushwhack route up the west side of the stream. The bushwhack meets the Escarpment Trail just west of the "official" point which is marked by a sign.

Turn left on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Burnt Knob. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. The final ascent onto Burnt Knob is a little steep requiring some help from your poles or surrounding roots and trees. At the top of this short but steep ascent there is a nice view to the north of the valley and a view to the east toward Acra Point. Continue on this trail for a short distance until a short spur leads of to the right. This viewpoint offers an unobstructed view of the Black Dome Valley, Acra Point and the Blackhead Range. This is a good place to stop and enjoy a snack and the view. This area is only about .35 miles from the junction with the Black Dome trail and less if you did the bushwhack.

Continue on for another .35 miles until the trail starts to descend. From here you can see Windham mountain and get some views to the south. Return by retracing your path on the trail or the bushwhack. You can return on the Black Dome Trail even if you bushwhacked up. Before the first water crossing, turn right or west for a short distance until you come to the Batavia Kill. Cross here and walk up to the top of the ridge. You should find the track of your bushwhack up. Follow this track to bushwhack back to the trail register and the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Burnt Knob and Acra PointTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.5 mi 1730 ft GPSies

link to topo map Park at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the left. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. Immediately re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the trail for about 1.1 miles where you will meet the blue Escarpment Trail. When the streams are running high, you may be unable to make the second crossing after the bridge without running the risk of getting very wet at the beginning of the hike! Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains.

Turn left on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Burnt Knob. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. The final ascent onto Burnt Knob is a little steep requiring some help from your poles or surrounding roots and trees. At the top of this short but steep ascent there is a nice view to the north of the valley and a view to the east toward Acra Point. Continue on this trail for a short distance until a short spur leads of to the left at about 1.4 miles. This viewpoint offers an unobstructed view of the Black Dome Valley, Acra Point and the Blackhead Range. This is a good place to stop and enjoy a snack and the view. From this viewpoint start your bushwhack to the top of the ridge by heading straight up the spur trail and climbing UP. The bushwhack up and along the ridge to the highest point is only about .3 miles. From the top head southwest and DOWN until you meet the Escarpment Trail. Turn left to head east toward Acra Point. Pass by the turn to the parking area on The Black Dome Trail and continue up the hill to the east. At about 2.7 miles watch for a spur trail to the right which leads to another nice lookout. This one looks down the Black Dome valley and has a great view of the Blackhead Range. Spend some time here and then go back to the Escarpment Trail and turn right to walk another .5 miles to the highest spot on Acra Point. Continue along the trail to 4.9 miles where you will meet the Batavia Kill Trail. Along the way there are several ups and downs. Turn right at the trail junction to get back to your car. This last part is 1.6 miles but it is all downhill!

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Buttermilk Falls State Park (NY)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.0 mi. 760 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head south on Route 13 from Ithaca, New York. Watch for signs for East Buttermilk Falls Road and Buttermilk Falls State Park on your left. The main Buttermilk Falls area is a popular swimming area and it may be hard to get good pictures of the falls from below. Walk through the swimming area to pick up the trail on the west rim of the gorge on the Gorge Trail. As you walk up the first set up steps you may be able to get better pictures. The main "falls" simply has water that passes over a wide expanse of harder bedrock and does not really fall. Over the years the stream has cut an interesting path through the rock forming the gorge. You will soon be at another falls without a sheer drop but one that is narrower and, therefore, seems to be faster flowing. As you continued along the path, you will see how the stream has meandered along the gorge and causing many different and interesting formations. Another falls will appear soon as the water passes through a narrow slot in the rocks. In several places the swirling water has cut circular "pools" in the rock which are deep with rather large diameters. More falls and more interesting formations appear along the way as the path continues climbing up the gorge. At the top of one set of steps you will see a nice three-tiered cascade. There is a lean-to on the right of the trail. Pass by the bridge that crosses the stream to make sure you see the whole gorge. There are several more falls and interesting rock formations and then you will be at Pinnacle Rock. Here a spire of rock has either pulled away from the gorge wall or, more likely, is of greater hardness than the surrounding stone. In any case, it is quite impressive standing tall right next to the path. The pattern of falls, plunge pools, and slots continues as you walk to the head of the gorge but they become less frequent as the stream volume deceases. Cross the next bridge to get to the Rim Trail on the east side of the gorge. This trail descends for most of its length but has at least one area that drops to the gorge before climbing again to the rim. In several places the trail meets a service road and the path was not well marked. The Rim Trail will take you back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the out and back hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Cabot Mountain from Beech Hill RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.2 mi. 917 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head toward Lew Beach on the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor. Pass through Lew Beach toward Turnwood. Watch for a right hand turn with a road sign for Beech Hill Road. Drive up the road for about 2.6 miles and park at the parking area on the right. The hike to the Beaverkill Vista viewpoint and back is only be about 3 miles but part of it is steep. The first part of the trail is flat and actually descends a little and it almost always wet. At about .25 miles into the hike the trail starts to ascend and gains 575 feet over the next .5 miles. The grade is around 25% in most places! After this point the trail flattens out and rolls a little along the way to the viewpoint. At .85 miles you may notice what looks like a road off the trail on the left. I don't know much about it but it does look very much like a road. Continue without much change in elevation to 1.25 miles where the trail ascends again and then drops a little to the vista at 1.6 miles. Turn around to retrace your steps back to the car. The challenge on the way back is to descend safely on the steeper slopes but the return is almost always faster. We were back at the car by 2:40 PM having covered 3.2 miles in just under 2 hours. The trip up took 1 hour and 10 minutes. The return journey was completed in 45 minutes.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Cabot Mountain from Big Pond (out and back)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.4 mi. 1635 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head toward Lew Beach on the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor. Pass through Lew Beach toward Turnwood. Where the Beaverkill Road turns to the right just before the Turnwood Store, turn left on Barkaboom Road and drive a short distance to the parking area on the right just before Big Pond. Cross the road and start up the trail which is well marked and maintained. The trail starts rising right from the road and continues to gain elevation for just over one mile to the highest point on Tocuh-Me-Not Mountain gaining almost 800 feet along the way. Continue over the highest point on Touch-Me-Not Mountain to the trail junction with the Campground Trail. Stay to the right on the Touch-Me-Not Trail and continue to descend to about 1.6 miles where the trail meets the Little Pond Loop Trail on the left. At the junction continue straight ahead on the Touch-Me-Not Trail and prepare for the climb up Cabot Mountain. Walk along a fairly flat section of trail toward Cabot Mountain until at 1.8 miles the trail turns a little to the left and starts the ascent up Cabot Mountain. This area is often covered in nettles when they are in season! Soon you will be climbing the steep sections that pass through several different rock formations. There are several parts to the climb and each is tricky in its own way. Over the next .4 miles the trail gains 470 feet of elevation at an average grade of 24%. After the last section, the trail flattens as it follows a plateau to the Beaverkill Vista at 2.2 miles. Spend some time at the vista and the turn around and return the way you came. If you wish there are other variations on the hike which can be found elsewhere in these trail descriptions.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Campbell Brook LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.5 mi. 1622 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. As you crest Cat Hollow and start down the other side, there is a small parking area on the left side of the road after Jug Tavern Road. Park here and sign in at the trail registry. Walk down the woods road and cross a small brook which may be high when there has been significant rain or snow melt. In this area are several old foundations to explore. Walk along the trail by the brook and cross on the footbridge. The trail now begins to ascend Campbell Mountain and can be wet with running water. At about 1.2 miles there is a sharp turn or switchback to the left but it is well marked. The trail continues to ascend rather steeply and at 1.3 miles is a lean-to with privy. The highest point on the trail (2430 feet) is reached at around 1.9 miles. Continue on down the other side of the hill to Campbell Brook Road at 2.4 miles. Cross the road here and pick up the Trout Pond Trail on the other side. The trail continues to descend until you cross the bridge over Campbell Brook at 2.75 miles.From there it is a 1 mile climb to the highest point on the hike at 2510 feet. Head down the other side to Campbell Brook Road at 4.3 miles. From here it is a 3.2 mile road walk back to the car. Turn left on Campbell Brook Road. Make the next left onto Campbell Mountain Road. Turn right at the next intersection on Jug Tavern Road. Stay on Jug Tavern until it meets Route 206. Turn left and walk .7 miles downhill back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Campbell Mountain LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.2 mi. 1130 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. As you crest Cat Hollow and start down the other side, there is a small parking area on the left side of the road after Jug Tavern Road. Park here and sign in at the trail register. Walk down the woods road and cross a small brook which may be high when there has been significant rain or snow melt. In this area are several old foundations to explore. Walk along the trail by the brook and cross on the footbridge. The trail now begins to ascend Campbell Mountain and can be wet with running water. At about 1.2 miles there is a sharp turn or switchback to the left but it is well marked. The trail continues to ascend rather steeply and at 1.3 miles is a lean-to with privy. The highest point on the trail (2430 feet) is reached at around 1.9 miles. Continue on the trail as you descend to Campbell Mountain Road. Turn left on Campbell Mountain Road and walk slightly uphill .7 miles toward the intersection with Jug Tavern Road. At the intersection turn left and continue to hike toward Route 206. There are a few hunting cabins and second homes along the road and several permanent dwellings. After about 1.5 miles turn left on Route 206 and hike downhill to complete the loop.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image at the left shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Campbell Mountain Out and BackTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.0 mi. 1270 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. As you crest Cat Hollow and start down the other side, there is a small parking area on the left side of the road after Jug Tavern Road. Park here and sign in at the trail registry. Walk down the woods road and cross a small brook which may be high when there has been significant rain or snow melt. In this area are several old foundations to explore. Walk along the trail by the brook and cross on the footbridge. The trail now begins to ascend Campbell Mountain and can be wet with running water. At about 1.2 miles there is a sharp turn or switchback to the left but it is well marked. The trail continues to ascend rather steeply and at 1.3 miles is a lean-to with privy. The highest point on the trail (2430 feet) is reached at around 1.9 miles. You can turn around now or walk down to "tag" Campbell Brook Road. This is another .6 miles downhill which you must climb on the return trip. You can also continue and fashion a loop out of the trails and back roads in the area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Trout Pond to Route 206Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.4 mi. 2700 ft. GPSies

link to topo map About half of this hike is on trails and the other half on back roads. Even the roads are scenic so you don't lose much walking along them. The initial part is the same as the Trout Pond hike.

Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed. Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road half a mile to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Bear right on stay on the blue-blazed Trout Pond Trail. This trail continues for another 3.1 miles. On the way you pass over the shoulders of two unnamed mountains. Campbell Brook and Campbell Mountain Roads are the low points in between. The trail goes on for another 1.9 miles and up and down another mountain until it meets Route 206. Turn right on Route 206 and walk .7 miles up the hill until you turn right on Jug Tavern Road. After walking 1.8 miles along Jug Tavern make a left onto Campbell Brook Road. Continue walking on this road for 3.15 miles back to the car. Campbell Brook changes to Morton Hill Road after a short distance but there are no turns.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. The vertical ascents and descent are not as pronounced as shown here since they are exaggerated by the overall distance. The first low point is the trail head register at Russell Brook. The second is at the base of the climb up to Route 206. You can see that Morton Hill Road is downhill all the way!)


Colgate Lake to Stoppel PointTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.9 mi. 1947 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Take Route 23C north from Route 23A in Tannersville. Stay on this road until it crests the hill at Onteora Park and passes the stone church at the top. Stop here for some very nice views of the Devil's Path. Continue down the other side of the hill to East Jewett. Turn onto CR 78 which should have a sign for Colgate Lake. Pass Colgate Lake on the right and park at the DEC parking area on the left. The gate marks the beginning of the yellow-blazed Colgate Lake Trail. The trail starts through a meadow with some nice views of the surrounding mountains. After about a quarter of a mile it enters the woods. The trail is mostly flat and winds its way in back of Lake Capra which is a privately owned inholding in the Catskill Park. There are several bridges of different types over various bodies of running water.

Along the trail watch for a beaver meadow on the left at about 2.5 miles. Walk out to the beaver meadow which was once a beaver pond. There is a nice view of Blackhead Mountain from here and the meadow itself is pretty. Just passed the meadow is a beaver pond and the trail skirts this area. A little further at about 3.1 miles is another meadow with another great view of Blackhead Mountain. A few hundred feet up the trail you can cut into the woods on several informal trails or you can make your own. There is a nice small, secluded waterfall here. Back on the main trail it is another 2.3 miles to the junction of the trail with the Escarpment Trail. This last part of the walk is more uphill as you ascend to Dutcher's Notch. You will be walking between the Escarpment on your right and another ridge on your left. On your immediate left is a deep ravine. The terrain is rugged and beautiful but offers no views.

At the junction with the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, turn right and be prepared to climb. The trail takes you up to the Escarpment which was on your right as you were coming up the Colgate Lake trail. The trail climbs some but is not too steep. Once on the Escarpment the trail is mostly flat until Stoppel Point. All along the trail you can see that you are on a ridge and that there might be interesting views especially on your left. Keep walking and wait for some real viewpoints! At 1.2 miles is a great lookout right on the trail with views to the north and northeast. Back on the trail the climbing gets steeper now as you begin to ascend to Stoppel Point. In a little less than a mile you will find the wreckage of a two-seater Piper Cub right on the trail on the left. Passed the wreck only a few hundred feet is a lookout to the south and west.

Keep walking on the trail and pass the point where your GPS might indicate the location of Stoppel Point. Walk until you find a DEC signpost and a GREAT lookout to the north and northeast. To get back just retrace your steps. Another option is to park a car at the Schutt Road parking area near North South Lake State Campgrounds. You can then walk through over North Mountain and North Point and experience the rest of the lower end of the Escarpment Trail.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image above shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Colonel's ChairTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look (Spruceton Trail)
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.0 mi. 2907 ft. GPSies

link to topo map I have included the summit of Hunter Mountain on the map and profile. You can cut some time, distance and elevation by avoiding the climb to the peak. However, once you are as far as the Colonel's Chair Spur Trail the peak of Hunter is only a mile and a quarter further. The peak is the second highest in the Catskill's. It also has a fire tower which offers a spectacular view of most of the other peaks on a clear day.

Park at the large trailhead parking lot near the end of the Spruceton Road. This is the first of three parking lots and each is smaller than the previous. Find the blue-blazed Spruceton Trail which starts as a wide, gated road which follows Hunter Brook. After crossing a small bridge across the brook, you will come to a hairpin turn to the right. Look to your right as you ascend this trail for imposing views of West Kill. After 1.7 miles, the trail turns right off the road but remains fairly wide and well kept. In the winter water from the spring can overflow the trail forming ice flows that can be dangerous. In the other seasons this spring may cause the trail to be muddy. At the spring is a nice lookout which offers views of Rusk Mountain, West Kill, and, farther off, North dome and Sherrill.

Only .3 miles beyond the spring is the Colonel's Chair spur trail blazed in yellow. This trail descends almost 500 feet over 1.1 miles and ends up at the top of the Hunter Mountain ski area. Several areas are steep and, of course, must be ascended on the way back. As you walk you will notice colored and numbered trails. These are used for snowshoeing and mountain biking. Stay on the main trail which turns into a dirt road. You will pass on open area on your left which is a stone quarry. A little further on the right is a lookout and a sculpture of Rip VanWinkle. If you miss this, you can follow the signs from the ski lifts. Stay on the trail until you start to see ski lifts. At this point you can walk around to the top of the various lifts and slopes. The views of the surrounding mountains and those in the distance are beautiful. There are also great views of the village of Hunter in the valley below. Reverse your steps to climb back up to the main trail. At this point you can turn left to the summit of Hunter Mountain or right to get back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image above shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Conesville to Manorkill FallsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.9 mi. 1760 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Follow Route 30 through Margaretville, Roxbury and Grand Gorge. Turn right on Route 990V and drive through Gilboa and West Conesville. Three miles after the intersection with the Prattsville Road you will be in Conesville. Park in parking lot at the firehouse as far out of the way as possible. Walk east on the main road to Champlin Road and turned right. The road has a hardpacked dirt surface and there are only a few houses near the beginning. Watch for the point where the Long Path turns right off the road. This happens after walking past a driveway on the right at about .8 miles. Just off the road is a sign explaining the trail is now on private property. There is also a small mailbox and a request for hikers to "sign in". The next 2.7 miles of hiking is through private land as the Long Path heads almost due west and just to the north of Sickler's Mountain. The route is downhill most of the way. In this area, as in so many others along the Long Path north of the Catskill Park, there really isn't a trail. There may be paint blazes on the trees but there is little evidence that a trail was constructed or that anybody walks the route very much. There is little or no maintenance in most places. It can be very hard to watch the blazes and watch your footing at the same time. At 2.2 miles you will pass north of the summit of Sickler's Mountain and there are some very interesting cliffs on the left. Remember not to violate the property owner's request that hikers stay on the "trail". Follow the paint blazes which are often placed along old woods roads. There are many more open areas which may be heavily populated by briars and nettles! As you get closer to Pangman Road there are a few places to get some views by walking off the trail. Pangman Road is about 3.5 miles into the hike and the straight line distance to Manorkill Falls is almost exactly a mile. Walk downhill from Pangman Road for .85 miles until we you can see Prattsville Road ahead through the trees. Just before you get to the road the trail comes very close to the edge of the gorge cut by the Manorkill. The Manorkill usually flows slowly and lazily below and, in its present state, does not look like it could have cut such an impressive ravine. As you approach the road, the blazes turn north to almost parallel the road. The first part is simply a zigzag through numerous blowdowns. After that, the blazes take you within sight of the Manorkill again near the area of the upper falls. The land below the trail is marked with orange paint so continue to a spot where there is a lookout down into the gorge. Several different viewpoints provide good opportunities to take pictures of the falls and rapids. Continue out to the road and turn right to walk over the road bridge. You may want to stop on the bridge and look to the right for a better view of the upper falls. The main falls is just below the bridge and it is hard to see. Walk out to Route 990V and turn right to head towards West Conesville and the Conesville. The entire walk is about 3 miles. This road always seems busy but in most places it has a wide enough shoulder.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the lollipop counterclockwise hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Creamery Road to Doney HollowTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.2 mi. 860 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Head north on Route 30 through Margaretville, Roxbury and Grand Gorge. Continue on Route 30 passing Minekill Falls and Lansing Manor. Watch for the NYPA fishing access road on the right just before a bridge and the sign for Blenheim. Turn right and park on the shoulder of the road. Go back out to Route 30 and turn left to walk downhill to Creamery Road. Turn left onto this dead end street and watch for paint blazes on a few trees and poles. Just after the turn there is a rather large and old cemetery up on the right bank. At about .3 miles there are some blazes on the left although they may be hard to see. Head up a very steep bank and passed the cemetery on the right. Climb to some level ground and turn right to walk along the top of the ridge. This section may be VERY poorly marked so watch carefully for the blazes at about .35 miles. From this point the blazes are hit and miss and there is no trail to follow. At about .5 miles you will come out into a field where there are blazes along the edge. Walk to the corner of the field and turn left uphill at the edge of the field. At the top there is a single blaze on a tree but there was no indication of which way to turn. Turn right and look for a blaze on a tree. You may have to wade through tall grass to get to the treeline. Walk down a steep bank to come out to West Kill Road. Turn left on West Kill Road and begin a road walk. At .9 miles pass by the turnoff onto Burnt Hill Road on the right. At 1.15 miles the trail turns into the woods and ascends another steep bank through grass and briars to a small ridge. Walk along the ridge parallel to the road and within sight of it most of the time. The trail is in the woods for a little more than .1 miles then you will be right back out on the road. Cross the road and ascend another bank to start on a section of "trail" that is more like a bushwhack. Blazes are few and far between and blazes are missing at some important turns. The blazes pass above a pond where you will sidehill as best you can. At around 2.2 miles there is a single paint blaze on a tree and a choice of two equally distinct trails. Turn left and come to West Kill Road within less than a hundred feet. The trail crosses the road and an descend to the bank of the West Kill. After this descent, the blazes again become hard to find and the trail seems to meander around. The West Kill at this point is not spectacular. This section only lasts for .4 miles until you climb another steep bank. At 2.6 miles turn left on West Kill Road and walk to a small parking area near a bridge. Turn around here. You may reverse your route OR walk back on West Kill Road. The walk back on West Kill Road to Route 30 is 2.1 miles. At Route 30 turn right and walk back up the hill to the car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the lollipop counterclockwise hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Crystal LakeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.9 mi. 410 ft. GPSies

link to topo map This area is a small New York State Wild Forest area between Roscoe and Fremont Center. Get on County Route 93. About halfway between the Roscoe and Fremont center watch for Tennanah Lake Road which heads north from CR 93. After the turn the parking area will be a short distance on the left. Depending on the season you may be able to drive up the access road and park in the small parking area. In the winter you will have to park on the side of the road as there is no maintenance.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Delaware Water Gap: Buttermilk Falls (NJ)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.2 mi 1340 ft GPSies

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One of the hardest parts of this hike is finding the location of the highest falls in New Jersey. From Route 209 in Dingman's Ferry, Pennsylvania cross the bridge on Route 739 over the Delaware River. Turn right almost immediately on Old Mine Road. Old Mine Road quickly becomes Walpack Flatbrook Road. Stay on this road for a little over 8 miles from the bridge. Mountain Road will be on your left but is poorly marked. The road surface is as poor as the marking and may be impassable for some vehicles at certain times. Drive carefully for about 1.5 miles and park in the parking area on the left. The falls is directly across the road from the parking area. At this point you could return to your car. The hike described here takes in a few more points of interest but is not easy.

From the base of the falls hike up the trail using the wooden steps to access an observation platform about halfway up the falls. Near the top there is another platform which gives limited views to the north. Continue on the trail across a bridge and up the west side of the stream. Hike for about .9 miles and before taking a right on a woods road. This first part of the trail is steep in parts. The next 1 mile of the trail is almost flat and remains woods road for most of the way to the shores of Hemlock Lake. Along the way the trail passes by a pretty beaver pond. At the shores of Hemlock lake turn left on a dirt road and walk by the northern and eastern shore of the lake. The lake is a popular place to swim even though all the "beaches" are rocks. The trail will gain some elevation over the next .75 miles until it intersects the Appalachian Trail. Walk straight ahead across the AT and follow the paths and roads down to the shores of Crater Lake. Local legend says the lake was formed by a meteor impact but it seems entirely too shallow for this to be true. This is another popular bathing area since there is a road on the other side that runs directly to the lake. Return to the At and turn right. As you hike along the AT for the next .8 miles the trail rises only slightly. On your right is Paradise Mountain. Turn left to start to descend back to the junction with the woods road you used earlier. Stay straight ahead at the junction and walk back down the hills and the wooden steps to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the lollipop hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

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(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Delaware Water Gap: Buttermilk and Hidden Falls (NJ)Trails IndexTop of page

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One of the hardest parts of this hike is finding the location of the highest falls in New Jersey. From Route 209 in Dingman's Ferry, Pennsylvania cross the bridge on Route 739 over the Delaware River. Turn right almost immediately on Old Mine Road. Old Mine Road quickly becomes Walpack Flatbrook Road. Stay on this road for a little over 8 miles from the bridge. Mountain Road will be on your left but is poorly marked. The road surface is as poor as the marking and may be impassable for some vehicles at certain times. Drive carefully for about 1.5 miles and park in the parking area on the left. The falls is directly across the road from the parking area. At this point you could return to your car. The hike described here takes in a few more points of interest but is not easy.

From the base of the falls hike up the trail using the wooden steps to access an observation platform about halfway up the falls. Near the top there is another platform which gives limited views to the north. Continue on the trail across a bridge and up the west side of the stream. Hike for about .9 miles and before taking a right on a woods road. This first part of the trail is steep in parts. The next 1 mile of the trail is almost flat and remains woods road for most of the way to the shores of Hemlock Lake. Along the way the trail passes by a pretty beaver pond. At the shores of Hemlock lake turn left on a dirt road and walk by the northern and eastern shore of the lake. The lake is a popular place to swim even though all the "beaches" are rocks. The trail will gain some elevation over the next .75 miles until it intersects the Appalachian Trail. Walk straight ahead across the AT and follow the paths and roads down to the shores of Crater Lake. Local legend says the lake was formed by a meteor impact but it seems entirely too shallow for this to be true. This is another popular bathing area since there is a road on the other side that runs directly to the lake. Return to the At and turn right. As you hike along the AT for the next .8 miles the trail rises only slightly. On your right is Paradise Mountain. Turn left to start to descend back to the junction with the woods road you used earlier. Stay straight ahead at the junction and walk back down the hills and the wooden steps to the parking area.

Turn right and walk about .5 miles down the road. Turn right into the woods on an informal path. Cross over the stream and walk along bank of the small creek for several hundred feet. You should see Hidden Falls at this point. Some nice views of the falls can be had from above but the banks are steep and slippery. Scrambling up the banks is DANGEROUS! It is better to take your pictures from the base of the falls. When you are done, retrace your route back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Delaware Water Gap: Culvers Fire TowerTrails IndexTop of page

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Take Rt 206 south from Milford, PA and watch for the junction with Route 560. Drive 1.7 miles from the junction passing Kittatiny Lake on the right. Turn left on Upper North Shore Road. The road splits almost immediately into Sunrise Highway, a seasonal road, and Upper North Shore Road. Turn right into the parking area. Walk out the far endow the parking area and along Sunrise Highway. Watch for the blazes of the AT in about .25 miles. Turn right into the woods and begin to ascend the ridge on a trail that switches back several times. At the top of the trail there is a nice lookout over Culvers Lake. The trail turns left or northeast from here and follows along the ridge with minimal elevation gain the rest of the way. Around 1.6 miles you will spot a tower ahead but that is the communications tower. Just around the next bend is the fire tower. the official policy is that no one is allowed to climb the towers when an observer I not present. Fortunately, there are some nice views from the ground. To return the shortest way simply retrace your path up to then tower. Several other routes from Stokes Forest are possible and include other viewpoints like Sunrise Mountain.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Delaware Water Gap: Mount MinsiTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.51 mi. 1139 ft. GPSies

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From Main Street (Route 611) in Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania turn south on Mountain Road. Drive up the hill and watch for Lake Road on your left. Drive in and park in the lot to been the hike. Watch for the white blazes of the Appalachian Trail which will take you to the summit. You will pass by Lenape Lake on your right as the trail slowly ascends through the forest. The trail is rocky at times but not very steep. After about 1.2 miles the trail turns and starts a steeper ascent. There is a nice viewpoint here down to the river and over to Mount Tammany on the New Jersey side. As you continue to climb another viewpoint is evident at 1.8 miles. Since you are higher here, the views are generally better. The next .25 miles gets you to the relatively flat top of the mountain. Continue your walk passing a small building in the area where you can see the steps to a fire tower. The trail goes near the edge of the cliffs and side trails lead nearer the edge. Walk to the viewpoints to get good views south on the Delaware River. Turn back to start down the mountain and walkabout .45 miles from the summit. Bear left on the Mt. Minsi Fire Road. The road is not an official hiking trail but is very obvious and gives a different route down the mountain. Around 2 miles from the top Table Rock will be on your right. This large, flat rock gives another viewpoint but is no better than the ones you have already experienced. The fire road will intersect the AT just short of Lenape Lake and you can follow the trail back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)

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Delaware Water Gap: Mount TammanyTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.2 mi. 1190 ft. GPSies

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Exit Interstate 80 at the exit for the Kittatinny Point Visitors Center. Pass by the center and under Interstate 80. Park in the Dunnfield Creek parking area to begin your hike. Several routes are available. This one takes you up the Blue Dot Trail and down the Red Dot Trail although the reverse route is also interesting. In the parking area look for the kiosk and then spot the white blazes for the Appalachian Trail. After about .6 miles bear right on the green Dunnfield Creek trail but watch for another quick right onto the Blue Dot Trail. The trail gains about 850 feet over the next mile where it hits the Mount Tammany Fire Road on the ridge. The trail is rocky in many places and is a challenge but never very steep. Hike another .25 miles along the trail/fire road. The Blue Dot Trail ends and the Red Dot Trail begins at an incredible viewpoint on an open rock face. Walking down the rocks can be tricky but the views are even more rewarding.In wet or icy weather remain on the trail at the top where you will still have good views. The lookout allows you to look up and down the river. The descent on the Red Dot Trail is steeper than the ascent and there are some areas where you will have to scramble over rocks. Watch for additional viewpoints on the way down which give you another angle. The Red Dot Trail will return to the parking area but you will have to watch carefully as several informal paths confuse the issue.

(The map above shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)

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Delaware Water Gap: Sunfish Pond by Tammany Fire RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.8 mi 1944 ft GPSies

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Park at the Dunnfield Creek parking area off I80 just over the New Jersey border in the Delaware Water Gap. Take the Red Dot Trail from the parking lot and get ready for a steep climb! In 1.4 miles from the parking area the trail gains 1130 feet. There are several viewpoints along the trail that look upstream through the water gap. The best reward is the open rock face near the top that acts as a lookout.Walk out carefully onto the rock face to get a good view up and down the river. The Blue Dot Trail begins where the Red Dot Trail ends at the lookout. Walk about .25 miles on the Blue Dot Trail at which point it will turn left and start down off the ridge and back to the parking area. Continue straight ahead on the Tammany Fire Road. This unmarked path stays largely on top of the ridge as it meanders for about 3 miles until it meets the Turquoise Trail to Sunfish Pond. The fire road is relatively easy to follow but there are no markings of any kind. Turn left on the blue Turquoise Trail marked by a cairn but little else. The blazes are few and far between. After about .8 miles or so on the trail it meets and starts to follow a woods road around the pond. Be sure to watch for blazes as the trail bears left to a high point overlooking Sunfish Pond. From this viewpoint head out on the Turquoise Trail which soon ends at the Appalachian Trail. Turn left to go around the pond. This part of the trail is EXTREMELY rocky and hard to walk. Continue on around the lake on the AT. At the southwest end of the lake pick up the green Dunnfield Creek Trail and start to climb a little up to a small ridge. The trail does not climb all the way to the ridge but stays close to the creek as it heads southwest toward the Delaware River. The trail is very rocky and uneven for the first mile but begins to get smoother the further along. The trail follows most of the twists and turns in the shallow creek and you will cross back and forth to avoid the steep banks on one side or the other a number of times. In about 3 miles form the pond, there is a trail junction with the Blue Dot Trail up Tammany. A bridge here crosses the creek near what is sometimes called Dunnfield Falls. The Blue Dot Trail, Dunnfield Creek Trail and the AT all come together in this area. Continue on the AT back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

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Delhi Trails: Sheldon LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.6 mi. 1585 ft. GPSies

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In the village of Delhi, turn onto Route 28 south and drive to Sheldon Drive which is a left turn just before the school on the left. Drive to the end of Sheldon Drive and park in one of the school lots. The beginning of the trail is not clearly marked from the parking area but it is near the community garden. The entire trail system is marked with black arrows on a yellow background with no change in markers for the three different trails. The trail climbs starting at the parking area but at about .4 miles there is a "wall". Over the next .3 miles the trail gains 455 feet making the average grade 28%! The trails are wide woods roads and but the steepness of the trails makes them a little beyond the ability of most beginners. The trail begins by heading to the northeast but as it began to climb to the top of the ridge it turns to the south. The walk is through pleasant hardwood forests and at about .75 miles the trail levels off briefly at the top of the ridge. The Gribley Trail now starts a short but steep descent from one hilltop before a short but steep ascent to the next. Along the way the Frightful Falls Trail comes up on the right as it ascends from below. At 1.6 miles the trail is back on top of a hill and at the highest point on the hike. The trail description mentions viewpoints but there are none that are open. Almost immediately the trail begins to descend from the high point losing over 500 feet as it heads southwest off the ridge. At 2.3 miles there is a power line right-of-way with some views down into the valley. Just before this area, there is a trail junction where the Gribley Trail ends and the Bulldog Run Trail begins. The trails are marked with only one color so it is difficult to make these distinctions. From the right-of-way the trail continues to descend as it turns almost 180 degrees to head northeast. The trail parallels Route 28 for some distance ascending as it progresses. At about 3 miles the Bulldog Run Trail turns off to the left as it headed down to Route 28 and the Immanuel Lutheran Church. Continue straight ahead on the Frightful Fall Trail which ascends to the ridge to the Gribley Trail. The trail ascends to the ridge heading east or northeast and gains 285 feet in the process for an average 18% grade. At 3.5 miles turn left on the Gribley Trail and take note of a bluestone quarry. The Gribley Trail continues to ascend to the top of the ridge gaining another 170 feet. Walk across the top of the ridge and then start back down to the parking area. The descent of this steep area can be even more challenging than the ascent! Continue to follow the trail back to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the lollipop clockwise hiking route.)

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Denman Mountain LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.4 mi. 950 ft. GPSies

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Turn onto Moore Hill Road just east of the TriValley School in Grahamsville, NY. Head north staying on Moore Hill Road for about 3 miles. Park in the parking lot at the corner of Moore Hill and Glade Hill Roads. The road straight ahead is not maintained in the winter but the lot is also always plowed. Walk across the road and onto the snowmobile trail which begins a slight ascent up a shoulder of Denman Mountain but soon levels off> It descends to a trail junction at about .5 miles. A left turn at this junction leads back out to Moore Hill Road and the road that cuts over to Denman Mountain Road. Turn right to stay on the trail around the mountain. At .85 miles there will be a path or woods road on the left that leads down to some interesting stone foundations. The road is lined with stone walls on either side. The snowmobile trail continues to descend for the next mile but is always lower than the mountain on the right. Since the trail is lower, the water draining from the higher terrain makes the trail very wet in places depending on the season. At about 1.95 miles there is the ruins of a house or cabin on the right side of the trail. You have been heading mostly north but the road for your return is to the east. At 2.15 miles there is another trail junction where you should turn right and then bear to the left. For the next 1.2 miles the trail wanders back and forth and up and down but always around the mountain. Finally, at about 3.3 miles the trail turns in an easterly direction and heads directly for the road. For the next 1.5 miles the trail undulates up and down but always heads east. At 4.8 miles, you should hit the road and turn right to head south and back to the parking area. There are some interesting cliffs and one large boulder right next to the road. The road continues heading south and mostly descends with a few ups and downs until you are back at the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)

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Canopus Lake to Shenandoah MountainTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.0 mi. 1570 ft. GPSies

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Take exit 13 south off I84 and follow Route 9 south for 6.5 miles to Route 301. Turn left on Route 301, drive 4.6 miles and park on the shoulder of Route 301 just before Canopus Lake. Walk across the road and enter the woods on the AT to start the hike. The trail is very rocky at the beginning and ascends and then descends quite a bit. In the first .5 miles gain over 200 feet and then lose most of it again before gaining it back. You may be able to glimpse views of Canopus Lake through the trees. At about 2.0 miles the trail turns right sharply and begins to climb on a switchback. At the top is a rock outcropping with a nice view of the lake and the beach below. Just a little farther along the trail there is a lookout on the left that has a view to the north and west. At about 2.85 miles you will have dropped some elevation and will hear the traffic on the Taconic State Parkway. At this point the trail starts to follow a woods road and the surface became smoother and easier to walk. Continue to follow the trail NNE until it finally breaks out onto an open rock face at almost exactly 4 miles. The trail begins to descend toward Long Hill Road at this point. There is a USGS marker at the top and a US flag painted on the rocks. Turn around if you have not spotted a car further along the trail. This would be a good idea since it allows hiking 8 miles of trail instead of 4 miles out and 4 miles back.
(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Dennytown Rd to Canopus LakeTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.9 mi. 1440 ft. GPSies

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Take exit 13 south off I84 and follow Route 9 south for 6.5 miles to Route 301. Turn left on Route 301, drive 2.6 miles and turned right on Dennytown Rd. Drive 1.2 miles south and park in the parking area on the left where the AT crosses the road. The parking area is large with a trailhead sign and several stone buildings. Enter the woods at the back of the parking on the AT to start the hike. Ascend a low ridge and walk along the top. The trail will descend and ascend several of these ridges along the way. At 1.4 miles cross Sunk Mine Road and pick up the trail just on the other side. At 1.6 mile you will to cross a small stream that drains a beaver pond. Walk downstream a little to find a small waterfall. Just downstream from the waterfall is a round stone with a hole in the middle. This is an old millstone of some kind. Walk back to the trail and cross the stream. Inspect the beaver pond for recent activity and notice a large marsh covered in reeds downstream. There were many of these along the way. At 2.7 miles you will come to a junction with the Three Lakes Trail. Continue on the AT and you will find that you are walking on a sort of raised causeway supported by stonework. This continues for almost a mile. At 3.6 miles you will arrive at Route 301 and Canopus Lake. There are quite a few pullouts along the roadway. If you like, cross the road to get a better view of Canopus Lake. Turn around and walk northeast on the old road for less than a quarter mile where you will find the Three Lakes Trail on the right. Turned right and start south on the trail. Within a few hundred feet look for a long teach on the right side of the trail which is the Phillips Mine. Many of these mines are simple pits or trenches and they can be hard to spot unless you know what you are looking for. Explore some and then get back on the main trail. At 4.6 miles turn west just after passing a large marsh. This trail is lower than the AT and passes through more bottomland rather than staying on a ridge. At 4.9 miles descend to a small stream and cross the stream on some stones. The trail starts to ascend a ridge on a switchback. At 5.3 miles you will be at the cairn that marks the trail junction. Continue straight ahead on the Three Lakes Trail. At 5.5 miles you will pass by another lake. The trail continues without much elevation change and with a much flatter surface than the AT. At 6.7 miles the trail comes to the shores of the third lake. Just below the lake the trail crosses the outlet stream which can be difficult when the water is high. At 7 miles you will be back at Sunk Mine Road. Turn right and walk uphill for about a tenth of mile before turning south into the woods for the last stretch of trail back to the car. The final part of the trail is slightly uphill and along a small stream and another large marsh. Eventually you will cross the stream and pass by an old stone structure. From here it is a short walk through a meadow and back to the parking area.
(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Dennytown Rd to Old Albany Post RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.5 mi. 2550 ft. GPSies

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Take exit 13 south off I84 and follow Route 9 south for 6.5 miles to Route 301. Turn left on Route 301, drive 2.6 miles and turned right on Dennytown Rd. Drive 1.2 miles south and park in the parking area on the left where the AT crosses the road. The parking area is large with a trailhead sign and several stone buildings. Cross the road and begin your walk by descending slightly and then climbing to a ridge. This rolling terrain is typical in the area. The trail can have some very wet places with some areas resembling a stream bed while others may have pools of water. At 1.5 miles the trail turns sharply to the north which may seem incorrect but it soon approaches a small stream and begins to follow the stream south again. Eventually the trail heads due south and continues to descend albeit with a few moderate ascents along the way. At 2.7 miles cross South Highland Road and continue to head south and to descend. Crossed Canopus Hill Road at 3.7 miles and descend to Canopus Creek. In high water the creek can be a little challenging to cross but hop from rocks to rock to log and you will get across. In front of you is Canopus Hill and while the hike to the top was only about .7 miles the elevation gain is over 400 feet with a 15% grade. Hike up the hill but watch the blazes as some are clearly wrong! One directs you to the left as the trail turns right! At the top of the hill, there is an open spot but no real viewpoint. The star on the NYNJTC maps shows a lookout a little further along on the descent but there is no lookout. Like so many marked on the maps this one has been obscured by trees over the years. The descent on the other side is steep and rocky but the elevation loss is not as great as the gain on the other side. At 4.7 miles you will have completed the descent and be very near the Old Albany Post Road. Unfortunately, the trail parallels the road for another .6 miles before crossing one more swampy area. Cross Chapman Road and the Old Albany Post Road and arrive at the end of this section of AT hike. Turn around and follow the same path directly back to the car. Of course, you will have to hike back up and over Canopus Hill and after that the route is mostly uphill. Watch for the network of wide stone walls in the area. Back at the car take some time to look at the stone shed on the left side of the parking area. Walk down to the left of the field along the Three Lakes Trail and inspect the shell of another stone building.
(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Depot Hill to Nuclear lakeTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.2 mi. 1690 ft. GPSies

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This hike is really from Route 55 to Depot Hill back to Route 55 then around Nuclear Lake and back to the car.Take the Taconic State Parkway north off I84 and then take the next exit for Route 52 toward Carmel. At the Stormville Post Office turn left on Route 216 and follow it to Route 55. Turn right on Route 55 and within 1.5 miles find the AT parking area on the left. Head south on Route 55, cross the road when you meet the AT and head west into the woods. The first part of the trail is a well-packed dirt track which is a little too close to "civilization" judging by the broken bottles. In less than half a mile cross Old Route 55 and head down a set of wooden steps. After a very short walk in the woods, cross the railroad tracks. There may be a rather large beaver ponds on the other side which can be muddy. From the tracks begin an ascent of about a mile toward the top of Depot Hill. The elevation gain is only about 540 feet but there were some steep areas. At about 1.9 miles pass by the summit of Depot Hill without actually hiking over it. Pass by some wetlands as the trail undulates some. This area of the trail just before Depot Hill Road is also very rocky. At 2.3 miles crossed Depot Hill Road which was barely a single lane gravel track at this point. If you hiked to this road before you may turn around. Continue to walk for about another .2 miles and you will overlap the hike from Route 55 to Depot Hill. Turn around and start back to Route 55.

When you are back at Route 55 you will have hiked about 5 miles. You can walk back to the car or continue across Route 55 to hike a loop around Nuclear Lake. The distance from Route 55 to Nuclear Lake appears to be about .6 miles but the trail keeps winding this way and that extending the distance to 1.2 miles. You will eventually come to the first junction with the loop trail even though the lake is not in view. The AT so far has been level in most places and rocky in a few others but there has been very little up or down. Stay on the AT along the west side of the lake. At 6.5 miles into the hike, about 1.5 miles from Route 55, you will get a look at the lake and be able to walk down to the shore. In the early 1970's there was an explosion at a small research facility on the shores of the lake. This scattered a small amount of radioactive material in the surrounding forest. The material was cleaned up and subsequent testing showed no more radiation than normal background. Shortly after the facility was closed and the building razed. Head back to the AT again and the trail becomes very rocky and descends to very near the shore of the lake. Continue around the lake and at 6.8 miles the AT turns left. Bear to the right on the loop trail around the lake. The trail stays pretty far away from the water and from the cliffs that line the eastern shore. This trail starts out fairly flat but soon becomes rocky with a few short but steep ascents and descents. At one point a path to the right leads to a very nice lookout with views of the small island and the rest of the lake. Continue on the main trail and you will soon cross the access road to the lake. Re-enter the trees and complete the loop by rejoining the AT at 7.9 miles into the hike. It is almost exactly 2 miles around the lake and you only have the 1.2 mile walk back to the car to go. As you near Route 55 you may take the blue shortcut trail on the right back to the parking area to avoid hiking along the main road.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Diamond Notch TrailTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.0 mi. 1340 ft. MSR Maps unavailable GPSies

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From Phoenicia follow Route 214 north to Lainsville. Turn left on Diamond Notch Road. The first part of the road is paved and even the gravel section after that is in good shape. When you reach the end of the road, continue up the grass and dirt track to the parking area. This portion of the road is at least .5 miles but may be longer and it certainly seems longer! The road is very uneven with large rocks sticking up and is only one vehicle wide. . Drive slowly and avoid the rocks to make it to the parking area. The first part of the trail seems well-used and is rather well-maintained as it passes along Hollow Tree Brook. Several spots along the trail have small cascades and falls when there is enough water in the brook. The trail becomes extremely rough trail with many rocks as you continue to ascend. At one point the trail turns to the right as it crosses a streambed and ascends a set of rock steps. The trail gains 1000 feet in elevation over 1.4 miles to Diamond Notch. At this point there is an open spot that gives limited views down the notch to the south. Walk a little farther on the trail and it levels out some and passes between the Westkill Ridge on the left and another on the right. There is a deep gorge on the left of the trail and the area is similar to Dutcher's Notch in the Blackhead Range. Begin to descend over a very rocky trail heading toward Diamond Notch Falls. Pass the Diamond Notch lean-to on the right side of the trail. Within only .5 miles you can see the bridge above Diamond Notch Falls. Walk across the bridge and down the steep bank on the left to get to the base of the falls. The falls are best when there is a good volume of water in the Westkill. When you are ready, turn around and reverse your route back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Dickinson Hill Fire TowerTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.0 mi. 550 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Grafton Lakes State Park is on Route 2 between Troy and Petersburg. Turn north into the park entrance and look for North Long Pond Road. This road is the one you turn onto when you enter the "Winter Entrance" to the park. Drive a little over 2 miles to the parking area at the northeast corner of Long Pond. Just before the parking area you will pass the sign for the fire tower trail on your right. Walk back up the road from the parking area and turn left onto the trail. The trail is a wide woods road and multiuse trail that has no really steep sections. After about 1.25 miles the trail ends at Fire Tower Road near a private residence. Fire Tower Road goes directly to the tower but there is no parking on the road. Walk northeast on Fire Tower Road for a few hundred feet until you are at the gated access road to the tower on the right. Walk up the access road to the tower. The tower can be climbed year round and the cab is always open. There are 360 degree views with the best views of the Catskills to the west and southwest. The only drawback is the communications tower that shares the summit of the hill.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Doney Hollow to Old Cemetery RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.7 mi. 1770 ft. GPSies

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Head north on Route 30 through Margaretville, Roxbury and Grand Gorge. Just after coming to North Blenheim, turn left on West Kill Road and drive a little over two miles where there is a small pulloff on the left side of the road. Walk a little farther along the road and over a bridge to the point where the trail cuts right into the woods. The trail follows a woods road but after a short distance leaves the road to climb a bank. The woods road has been eroded by the small creek and all but disappears causing this detour. After another short distance, the trail rejoins the road. For the next 1.6 miles the trail stays mostly on woods roads paralleling a small creek. There are no majestic views over the countryside but there is a lot of evidence of past habitation. At about 1.25 miles there is a large pile of stones across the stream. This was once a dam and the site of one of two water-powered sawmills. On the other side of the trail is a set of stone steps that leads to a foundation. You will be passing by the summit of Burnt Hill. The area got its name from the frequent fires that were purposefully set in the early 1900's to improve the blueberry crops. Within a short distance, at about 1.9 miles, the trail crosses Burnt Hill Road. The road is little more than a single lane dirt and gravel woods road at this point. Cross the road and at 2.25 miles there is a short side trail on the left that leads to a small but pretty pond. A little passed the pond begin a rather steep descent to Cole Hollow Brook. In .6 miles you will have dropped over 400 feet and be at the edge of the brook. Turn left and walk another quarter mile northwest along the brook before the trail comes to Cole Hollow Road. Along the way there are several "pool diggers" in the brook. These artificial "waterfalls" oxygenate the water and help to erode small pools. Both of these actions help trout and other game fish to survive when the water level is low and the temperature rises. Turn left on Cole Hollow Road and walk to about 4 miles where the road turns left. Continue straight ahead on what is marked as Thomson Road on many maps. The old name for the road is Huckleberry Kingdom Road reflecting the importance of that "crop" in the area. Walk along this road for only about .5 miles where the trail turns left into the woods. Just before this turn there is a homestead on the right side of the road. This was the site of the home of Henry Conklin. Conklin authored the book Through Poverty’s Vale, which details the difficulty of living in area in the 1840s. The trail travels along a stream and there may be nettles to wade through since the trail is little traveled. Fortunately, the trail enters a pine forest and seems to follow a woods road which makes the hike more pleasant in several ways. At about 5 miles cross a small stream on a bridge and the trail intersects with a gravel road. You may turn around and retrace your path at this point or use the roads to form a partial loop. The road is marked as Old Cemetery Road on some maps and there is an old cemetery a little further up the Long Path. Turn right to hike south on Old Cemetery Road. Walking the roads is much easier than the trails particularly because of the level surface. At 6.3 miles stay right at a fork in the road to get on one of the many CCC roads in the area. This road has a very good gravel surface and is easy to walk although it heads uphill toward the pond and Burnt Hill. At 7.5 miles you will pass by the pond from earlier in the hike. Continue out to Burnt Hill Road and turn left to head back toward where the trail leaves Burnt Hill Road. Watch for the trail on the right which is only .1 miles from the intersection. The rest of the hike is a repeat of what you hiked earlier only in reverse.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the lollipop counterclockwise hiking route.)

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Dover Oak to Hoyt RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.9 mi. 1420 ft. GPSies

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This is one-way and uses a car spot at Hoyt Road.From Wingdale, NY head east on State Route 55 toward Connecticut. Just .2 miles before the Connecticut border, turn right on Hoyt Road. The parking area for the AT is only about .25 miles up Hoyt Road on the right. Park one car in the small lot and then drive west on Route 55 back to Wingdale. Continue west on Pleasant Ridge Road watching for Route 20 (Hoag's Corners Road) on the left. Turn left to drive south and watch for the Dover Oak on the left side of the road. The tree is hard to miss and there may be quite a few cars parked here. Be sure to head east from the tree and hike up through a field on a well-worn track. You will be in the fields or on the edge for a good part of the first mile. At about .6 miles look west and you will see a bare rock face. This is the Cat Rocks which is a popular lookout on the AT. After the first mile you will begin to descend and come to the wetlands around the Swamp River at about 1.4 miles. There is a boardwalk that crosses a small stream and then continues across the marsh. At about 2.1 miles cross the Swamp River on a bridge. At 2.35 miles you will cross the Conrail tracks and find a special station just for AT hikers. Just beyond at 2.4 miles is State Route 22 where you should turn left and hike up the road a few hundred feet to pick up the AT as it again passes through some fields. At 2.7 miles cross Hurds Corners Road and watch out for the electrified fence on the other side. Climb over the fence using the stile and take a look at an interesting wooden water tower in the field. Continue your walk up the ridge by way of the well-packed track through the fields. Enter the woods again at about 3 miles and then begin a sustained ascent at about 3.4 miles. This lasts until you gain the highest point on the hike at 4 miles. This is on Hammersley Ridge just above Quaker Lake which is to the east. Unfortunately, there are no views to be had as you walk along the ridge. From the high point on the ridge the trail is generally downhill for the next 3 miles heading northeast. Most of the walk is on packed dirt trail but there were a few rocky spots. At about 7 miles into the hike the trail turned almost due east and starts to ascend over two bumps that are part of Leather Hill. At 7.7 miles cross Leather Hill Road and continue east toward Duell Hollow Road. There is a steep descent at 8 miles which continues until you cross Duell Hollow Road. On this descent you will pass the Wiley Shelter where the trail makes a sharp right. Shortly after the shelter you will find the water supply for the shelter which is a well with a hand pump. You are getting close to your destination but the trail had one more "curve". The trail ascends from the road and then begins to head south instead of east. This maneuver is to avoid descending into the gully cut by Duell Hollow Brook. In doing so the trail turns a .2 mile hiked into something over a .5 mile detour! You will cross the brook on an interesting foot bridge with a fairly long span and a central support. There is one more short ascent on the other side and then another walk through some open fields. Just after this you will begin to descend through some trees and then break out onto Hoyt Road just north of the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Dover Stone Church: All TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.7 mi. 830 ft. GPSies

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Drive to Dover Plains, NY and park at the Dover Plains Elementary School at 9 School St. There is no parking at the entrance to the Dover Stone Church area which is one a lane that is on private property. Walk out to Route 22, turn right and walk north about 250 feet to a yellow on blue historical sign. Turn left here and walk up a private, gravel driveway. At the top is the sign for the beginning of the Dover Stone Church area. The shape of the sign reflects the shape of the opening of the Dover Stone Church grotto! Walk down the stone steps to a beautiful lane or walkway lined with maple trees. Continue to the other end of the lane to climb the other steps. A short path leads to a sign and kiosk that explain the historical significance of the area and shows a map of the trails. Begin to follow the trail along Stone Church Brook to the bridge over the brook. Just after the bridge, there is a sign directing us to the red, blue or yellow trails. Continue straight ahead along the creek being careful as you negotiate the slippery rocks beside the creek. The rocks are almost always wet from rain, humidity or water from the brook. In a very short distance you will see the opening to the grotto. Continue to walk along the side of the creek on the stones and enter the grotto if you wish being careful as the water may be high enough to make staying dry a problem. There is a 30 foot waterfall at the far end of the grotto but its beauty very much depends on the flume of water in the creek. A low volume makes it easy to get into the grotto but also makes the waterfall pretty tame. There is also a large rock that is locally known as "The Pulpit". Exit the grotto and walk back along the slippery rocks to the trail signs. Turn right to begin walking the new trails which all start out together on a climb. The blue trail is the Overlook Point Trail and is marked as 1.75 miles out and back. The elevation at the parking lot was about 400 feet so any elevation produces a viewpoint. Follow the blue markers as first the red and then yellow trails break off. The trail follows a woods road until the very last portion which is cut through the woods and along the edge of an escarpment. The trail heads south before looping southwest and then north with a final turn to the south. After .7 miles on this trail gains about 420 feet and ends at the lookout. The trail seems to end at a point where the view is limited. Some unmarked paths lead to a rock ledge that is lower but offers a less obstructed view. Head back following the Blue trail to the upper junction with the yellow Upper Loop Trail. Turn right at 1.95 miles to hike this trail. The trail rolls a little as it drops and then climbs to the top of a little hill. At 2.2 miles there is a limited viewpoint and then the trail begins to drop back down to meet the blue trail. The walk is pleasant without too much to see. At 2.5 miles you will be back at the point where all the trails come together. Continue straight ahead to walk the red trail which is marked as the Lower Loop Trail. The first part of this trail passes through some open areas which may have a lot of weeds. It is obvious that the main attraction is the Stone Church with the Overlook Trail a distant second. The Upper and Lower loop trails seem hardly used. Follow the red trail as it heads south ascending a few small hills. At 2.9 miles the trail makes an almost 180 degree turn and heads back to the north. Soon you will be back at the trail junction heading back down to the brook. Follow the trail back out to the kiosk and then to the lane lined with maples. Head back to you car the way you came.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Dry Brook: German HollowTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.3 mi. 1425 ft. GPSies

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There are several different ways to access this area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The German Hollow Trail comes up to the Dry Brook Ridge trail from a side road off the Dry Brook Road. In Arkville turn south on Dry Brook Road. Watch for Chris Long Road on the right. Go to the end of the road and turn around. Park on the right side of the road opposite a house. There is room for two cars at most. The yellow German Hollow trail is a wide woods road to the Dry Brook Ridge trail and is about 1.6 miles long. The German Hollow lento is, at present, buried underneath several large trees that have crushed it! Once on the ridge you can turn around or hike the Ridge Trail to the Penguin Rocks.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Dry Brook: German Hollow to LookoutsTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.1 mi. 2240 ft. GPSies

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There are several different ways to access this area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The German Hollow Trail comes up to the Dry Brook Ridge trail from a side road off the Dry Brook Road. In Arkville turn south on Dry Brook Road. Watch for Chris Long Road on the right. Go to the end of the road and turn around. Park on the right side of the road opposite a house. There is room for two cars at most. The yellow German Hollow trail is a wide woods road to the Dry Brook Ridge trail and is about 1.6 miles long. The German Hollow lean-to is, at present, buried underneath several large trees that have crushed it! Once on the ridge you can turn left on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail. Walk about a mile to the junction with the Huckleberry Loop Trail gaining about 300 feet along the way. Stay on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail for another mile and gain 225 feet until a short side trail leads to thee lookouts over the Pepacton Reservoir. .

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Dry Brook: Hill Rd to ViewpointsTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.75 mi. 1663 ft. GPSies

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There are several different ways to access this area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The Dry Brook Trail starts near the Agway store in Margaretville and proceeds over Pakatakan Mountain and to the viewpoints. The German Hollow Trail comes up to the Dry Brook Ridge trail from a side road off the Dry Brook Road. This route follows the upper Huckleberry Loop Trail from the Hill Road parking area. There are also two parking areas on Huckleberry Brook Road that can be used.

From Routes 28 and 30 in Margaretville get on Southside Road. You may also use BWS Route 10 if you are coming from the Pepacton Reservoir to the west. Watch for the turn onto Huckleberry Brook Road. It is about 2 miles from Margaretville and less than a mile from the junction of BWS Route 10 with Routes 28 and 30. After turning onto Huckleberry Road, watch for the turn onto Hill Road about a quarter mile up on the right. Continue on Hill Road for a little over 1 mile until you see signs for "wild forest". The parking area will be on the right and is small with only enough room for a few cars. This should not be a problem since this route is not as popular as it should be.

After parking, cross the road and sign into the register. The trail ascends not too steeply through a pine plantation where the trees are evenly spaced. The trail is wide as it overlaps an old woods road. The floor is covered with pine needles which makes it cushioned and easy to walk on. The pine plantation slowly gives way to hardwoods and then leads into more pines. At times the trail narrows as it leaves the meandering woods road. In places it is narrow enough to have briars and nettles in the trail! After a little more than 1.5 miles the trail ends at the blue Dry Brook Trail. Turning left will take to Margaretville so turn right to continue toward the viewpoints.

The trail on the ridge is relatively flat with several small ascents and descents. There are a few parts that pass by some large rocks but without any real "scrambles". After about 1.3 miles of walking, hints of a view appear on the right. Don't stop here since the lookouts are just ahead. The first lookout is a rock shelf with several levels. There are views from all levels but the ones from the lower levels are the least obstructed. The views ate to the west over Cold Spring Hollow and the Pepacton Reservoir. The trick is to hike this route on a clear day with little humidity so that the haze does not cloud the view. You may now walk another .7 miles the another set of viewpoints and the highest point on the ridge. The views aren't much different than the ones you have just taken in so you may want to immediately turn back and make your way back to the car. The trail back can be descended quickly especially after the turn onto the Huckleberry Loop Trail.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Dry Brook: Huckleberry Loop (complete)Trails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.2 mi. 2940 ft. GPSies

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There are several different ways to access this loop hike area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The Huckleberry Loop Trail crosses Hill Road and runs along Huckleberry Brook Road. There is a parking area on Hill Road and two on Huckleberry Brook Road. There is also a parking areas on Ploutz Road of the Millbrook Road but Ploutz Road is poorly maintained. This route starts at the Hill Road parking area and heads south to co the lower Huckleberry Loop Trail first and then proceeds up Dry Brook Ridge in a counterclockwise direction. The lower Huckleberry Loop Trail is NOT a trail for a good part of its length! Make sure you are willing to slog through heavy briars and undergrowth for about 3 miles!

From Routes 28 and 30 in Margaretville get on Southside Road. You may also use BWS Route 10 if you are coming from the Pepacton Reservoir to the west. Watch for the turn onto Huckleberry Brook Road. It is about 2 miles from Margaretville and less than a mile from the junction of BWS Route 10 with Routes 28 and 30. After turning onto Huckleberry Road, watch for the turn onto Hill Road about a quarter mile up on the right. Continue on Hill Road for a little over 1 mile until you see signs for "wild forest". The parking area will be on the right and is small with only enough room for a few cars. From the parking area walk up the road a few feet and turn right into the woods on the red Huckleberry Loop Trail.

Walk .3 miles south on the trail to the upper parking area on Huckleberry Brook Road. Bear right near the road, walk through a small open area and cross the bridge to the road. Walk west on the road for .8 miles to the lower parking area. Just passed the parking area on the left is a bridge over Huckleberry Brook. Sign the register here and get ready to start climbing right away. The trail soon merges with an old woods road and follows it until about .4 miles after the bridge. At this point it turns again and starts to climb the ridge. Be careful to make the turn to the right as the road continues straight ahead. For the next .85 miles the trail switches back several times as it climbs to the ridge line. Watch for some very large and very old hardwood and softwood trees. In addition, there are some impressive rock formation that show exceptionally clear sedimentary layers. At this point the trail begins to deteriorate. If you are lucky, someone will have cut down some of the briars, brush and undergrowth but the going will still be tough! For the next 3.5 miles you will have to hack your way through raspberry canes, briars, nettles, ferns and various bushes. You will do this without being able to see the rocks and fallen trees under foot that will trip you up. You will also be treated to several ascents and descents of small hills on your way to the parking area on Plover Road.

When you get to the trailhead on Plowboy Road you will have hiked about .4 miles but it will feel like half again as much distance. To get to Ploutz Road you will have dropped down from the ridge and then ascended to about 2400 feet. What awaits you is another 5 miles of hiking which starts with an ascent to the top of Dry Brook Ridge at almost 3500 feet. Walk across the road to the parking area and continue on the red trail. The trail now ascends for a little over a mile to the ridge. The ascent starts and ends easily but the parts in between can be steep at times! At the ridge the trail flattens and in about .35 miles you will reach the junction with the blue Dry Brook Ridge Trail. Turn left toward Margaretville and walk for about .8 miles to a viewpoint over Cold Spring Hollow and the Pepacton Reservoir. Another .7 miles of walking brings another set of lookouts with much the same view. Continue on the trail for another 1 mile until the junction with the red Huckleberry loop trail. Turn left on the trail and hike 1.55 miles back to the parking area on Hill Road. This descent is rather and you can make good time walking downhill. The trail descends not too steeply first through hardwoods and then narrows in several places as it leaves the meandering woods road. In these places some briars and nettles may encroach on the trail. After some more hard woods the trail merges with and stays on an old woods road that runs through a pine plantation where the trees are evenly spaced. The trail is wide as it overlaps an old woods road. The floor is covered with pine needles which makes it cushioned and easy to walk on. In at least one spot are some old foundations and in others stone walls.

(The map above shows the parking area and the counterclockwise hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Dry Brook: From Margaretville TrailheadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.0 mi. 2065 ft. GPSies

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This route starts at the Millbrook Trailhead and ends at the junction with the trail from Hill Road. Of, course, the hike could easily be extend by continuing out to the lookouts and beyond! In Margaretville get on Southside Road which runs parallel to Route 28 and head northeast. Park in the parking area alongside the road just after Fair St on the left. The trail starts across the road. The first 1.7 miles of the trail climbs Pakatakan Mountain and is wide woods road most of the way. A direct route up the mountain would be very steep so there are several switchbacks which also help to avoid some rather nice ledges and cliffs. The overall route shows a grade of about 12% but there are some short stretches that are around 20%! After the summit, your climb is still not over as Dry Brook Ridge is at a higher elevation. At about 2.6 miles the German Hollow Trail comes in from Arkville on the left. From German Hollow the trail climbs for another .5 miles when in inexplicably drops about 100 feet! From this point the trail turns almost due south and climbs nearly 200 feet in a little over .1 miles to Dry Brook Ridge. This is almost a 30% grade and you will feel it! To return to your car simply retrace your path. The Penguin Rocks viewpoint is only another mile along the ridge. The trail wanders back and forth and does gain an additional 225 feet of elevation but this can be a welcome respite from the steep ascent and subsequent descent of the ridge.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Dry Brook: From Millbrook TrailheadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.2mi. 1630 ft. GPSies

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This route starts at the Millbrook Trailhead and ends at the junction with the Huckleberry Loop Trail. The hike could be extended since another 1.3 miles will bring you to the Penguin Rocks lookout. You could also hike through to another trail head if you spot a car. The trail is deceptive since the elevation is gained over about three miles. However, the trail rises to 3460 feet and is #37 on the CHH list.

Get on the New York City road that leaves Margaretville and passes long the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir. After about 3.5 miles, watch for the Millbrook Arena Road on the left. Turn here and drive about 9.5 miles to the Millbrook trail head on the left. Park to begin your hike. Once you are on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail the hike is very straight forward as long as you stay on the marked trail. The trail starts up almost immediately over a small hill gaining 440 feet in the first .7 miles. It then drops almost 300 feet in the next .5 miles before starting up to the ridge. In the next mile the trail ascends to the ridge gaining 680 feet before leveling off at the top. For the next .9 miles the trail drops about 100 feet only to regain that elevation to the junction with the Huckleberry Loop trail coming up to the ridge from the west.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Dry Brook: Viewpoints from Millbrook TrailheadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.4 mi. 22440 ft. GPSies

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This route starts at the Millbrook Trailhead and is an out and back to the viewpoints over the Pepacton Reservoir. You could also hike through to another trail head if you spot a car. The trail is deceptive since the elevation is gained over about three miles. However, the trail rises to 3460 feet and is #37 on the CHH list. To get to the very highest point on the ridge you will have to bushwhack slightly to the north of the trail.

Get on the New York City road, Route 9/10, that leaves Route 28 just west of Margaretville and passes long the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir. After about 3.5 miles, watch for the Millbrook Arena Road on the left. Turn here and drive about 9.5 miles to the Millbrook trailhead on the left. Park to begin your hike. Once you are on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail the hike is very straight forward as long as you stay on the marked trail. The trail starts up almost immediately over a small hill gaining 440 feet in the first .7 miles. It then drops almost 300 feet in the next .5 miles before starting up to the ridge. In the next mile the trail ascends to the ridge gaining 680 feet before leveling off at the top. For the next .9 miles the trail drops about 100 feet only to regain that elevation to the junction with the Huckleberry Loop trail coming up to the ridge from the west. Continue passed this point for another 1.4 miles and you will arrive at the best lookout over the reservoir at 4.7 miles into the hike. Before this lookout there are several others but this one is the best. When you are done, turn around and follow your route back to the car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Dry Brook: From Ploutz Road TrailheadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.5 mi. 1380 ft. GPSies

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This route starts at the Ploutz Road Trailhead on the Huckleberry Loop Trail and ends at the Penguin Rocks lookout. The trail rises to 3460 feet on Dry Brook Ridge which is #37 on the CHH list.

Get on the New York City road that leaves Margaretville and passes long the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir. After about 3.5 miles, watch for the Millbrook Arena Road on the left. Turn here and drive about 6.5 miles to Ploutz Road on the left. This road is ROUGH but there is a small trail head parking area on the right as you drive up the road. Park here to begin your hike. The trail is a no nonsense affair that goes directly up to the ridge. In 1.25 miles it gains over 1000 feet and then virtually levels off on the ridge. Just out of the parking area you will cross over two parallel stone walls. These walls delineate a lane that probably lead from a barn to a pasture. Turn left along this lane and you will see that it opens into a large area bounded by stone walls. Trees have grown up in the pasture but it purpose is clear. At the top of the ridge the Huckleberry Loop Trail intersect the Dry Brook Ridge Trail. Turn left and walk about 1.4 miles to the lookouts. There are several different lookouts. The best is the last from this direction. There is a large stone ledge with several levels. The views into the hollow and over to the Pepacton are unobstructed. The only problem is a persistent haze in the valleys. Retrace your path back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Enfield Glen: Robert Treman State Park (NY)Trails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.0 mi. 1470 ft. GPSies

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Head south on Route 13 from Ithaca, New York. Watch for signs for Buttermilk Falls State Park. Drive another 2 miles south and watch for signs for Robert Treman State Park and Park Lane. Park in the main parking area to begin the hike. The trails here parallel the glen and can be done in either direction. From the parking area head north to get on the trail that runs along the north rim of the glen. The first part of the hike has a steep ascent to the gorge rim and does not have many points of interest for over a half mile! Enfield Glen is not as developed as some other parks which means there are fewer people but also that the trails are more rugged with fewer defined viewpoints. Along the way you may be able to walk down to the stream bed and photograph some of the numerous small falls and rapids on the stream. Some places you should use your better judgment and stay on the trail as trying to get to the stream bed is dangerous! After a variety of falls and rock formations you will pass a bridge that crosses to the rim trail on the south side of the glen. Bypass this bridge to continue on to the main attraction, Lucifer Falls. Continue to limb up the path and various stairs toward the head of the glen. You will soon be walking next to a railing and a high rock wall. As you round a corner, Lucifer Falls comes into view. It is truly impressive even with low water levels and has an impressive drop. After taking in the view, walk passed this viewing area and another falls will come into view. Around another corner is a stone bridge which leads to the path on the other side of the stream. Beneath the bridge is a narrow slot which channels water into another falls. You will eventually arrive at the upper parking area where you can turn around and head back along the south rim. Before turning around you can visit an old mill and the falls that powered it. Head back to the beginning of the rim trail and climb UP to the south rim of the gorge. The trail flattens at the top but still has its downs and ups. In one place the trail drops down an impressive set of stone steps to the level of the stream. It follows the stream briefly before climbing back up to the rim. There are several viewpoints along the way with one offering a nice view down to Lucifer Falls. Near the end of the trail you can see down to the gorge and the Lower Falls. There is a swimming area for the park which sort of ruins the appearance of the falls. Below the Lower Falls a small dam holds back some water to form a pool for swimming. The gorge below this is not as high as further up but has some nice features. On the other side is some artificial stonework and a stone building. Return to the main path and follow it through an area where there are some cabins. To cross the stream there is a walkway for hikers but cars have to drive through several inches of water and ford the stream to cross!

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Fahnestock MinesTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.0 mi. 766 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Fahnestock Park on the east side of the Hudson River in Putnam County is beautiful in its own right. It is also the site of several historic iron mines.

From Route 9D on the east side of the Hudson turn east on Route 301 and drive 5 miles to the intersection of Dennytown Road. Turn south and rive for less than a mile to the parking area on the left near the now closed Sunken Mine Road. Walk for about .3 miles on the road and then turn right into the woods to start the bushwhack to the Denny Mine. Head southeast for about .2 miles over a small hill. The Denny Mine is a large pit in the eastern side of the hill. From here head northeast and in another ,2 miles you should pick up the road/trail again. You will pass by a pond on the left. Continue on the road for only about .1 miles to where the road crosses a stream. Turn left on an unmaintained trail. Just after you start up the trail, the long open pits of the Hamilton Mine will be on your right. You can walk up to these pits to "explore" and photograph them. BE CAREFUL as many are filled with water and a fall into one would be a problem. Continue on the path for about .3 miles and then start heading to the left and over the top of the small ridge. The Sunk Mine is on the southeastern side of the ridge and is hidden. There is a steep and "slippery" descent to get down to the mine which consists of several open trenches and one large opening cut into the hillside. Inspect these features with caution as they can be precarious places. You can follow the unmaintained path back to the road and then walk the road back to the parking area. You can also follow the path to its end, only a short distance, where it intersects the blue 3 Lakes Trail. Turn left and follow this trail back to the road and then to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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Falls CreekTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.3 mi. 765 ft. GPSies

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This hike is all bushwhack with no defined trails and few paths. It follows a creek through a gorge that is beautiful but can be dangerous. Although the hike is just over 2 miles it can take between 2 and 4 hours to complete! It requires scrambling over large rocks and tree stumps, crossing the stream several times and climbing up and down steep banks. Choosing the right water level can be tricky. Too much water makes hiking up the creek bed dangerous and tricky but too little water means the falls are not interesting. Take State Route 17 west from Binghamton to Waverley. At Waverley head south on State Route 220 through Towanda to Monroeton. Turned west on Route 414 to a small town called Powell. Turn left or south on Brocktown Road. Crossed two bridges and turn right onto Weston Road along Schrader Creek on your right. When the road forks, stay to the right. Cross the first narrow cement bridge and KEEP going to the second narrow cement bridge. It is a total of about 6.1 miles from the turn onto Weston/Schrader Creek Road. You will be in State Game Lands 36. Park on the right just before the bridge.

The water in Falls Creek drains from a plateau with an elevation of just under 2000 feet. The elevation of the parking area is about 1200 feet. In 1812 coal was discovered on top of the plateau. By 1856 the coal was being commercially mined and the town of Barclay was well-established on the plateau. After the coal ran out, the area became a center for logging and tanning. Most of the large hemlock forests were removed to feed this industry centered at the town of Laquin on Schrader Creek. Due to all this industry the waters of Falls Creek like many in the area are highly acidic. To counteract the acidity the state has built a water treatment facility on the creek just before the water flows into Schrader Creek. A dam diverts water through a cistern filled with limestone. The water turns a device that grinds the limestone which then dissolves in the water to neutralize the acid. The rocks in the upper part of the creek have a distinctive orange tint from the acid but those in the lower part show almost no discoloration. To hike simply head up the creek. Walk in the creek bed or on the left or right banks as you see fit. There are a few small rapids and then some falls with drops of six to twelve feet. At about .55 miles there are three small but pretty water falls in a row. Just passed the third falls you will begin to hear and then catch a glimpse of Bradford Falls. Bradford Falls is ENORMOUS compared to the ones below it! It is at least 70 feet tall. The water drops over the edge into a pool and the falls is bordered by the high stone walls of an impressive gorge. Work your way up the creek bed and you may be able to stand at the base of the falls. The next challenge is how to get out of the gorge to continue hiking upstream. Walk back down the stream until you see a spot where you can work your way up the right bank (looking upstream). Any route will be a STEEP climb up a slippery bank.You can use some of the trees to pull yourself up. Walk along the high ground briefly before descending back to the creek. Just above Bradford Falls is Barclay Falls. This waterfall is not as high as the one below but has a higher volume of water or at least a tighter chute. Climb back up to the higher ground and get ready for another descent to an area above a series of cascades and chutes on the creek below. This area has a steep bank and there may be no safe way to get down to the creek bed. Climb back up the bank and walk the high ground before starting to work your way down a steep bank toward another cascade. Once you make it down the steep bank there is a more level area. There is a ten foot cascade in this area. Walk along a little path along the creek and you will catch a glimpse of another falls. At Laquin Falls the stream passes over a receding ledge and splits to form at least two streams of water. The flow is not great as it is high on the creek but the falls is interesting. The stream is almost flat at this point with a greatly reduced volume of water. You will be at 1850 feet and near the top of the plateau. This is the end of the hike up the stream. Cross the creek here and walk along the high bank on the other side until you find a woods road. Follow the road downstream as it parallels the creek. The road becomes more defined as it descends. When it meets Schrader Creek Road turn left and walk across the bridge to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Fawn Lake to Gifford HollowTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.2 mi. 1460 ft. GPSies

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Follow Route 30 into Middleburgh and turn right to head east on Route 145 to Huntersland Road just out side of town. Turn left on Huntersland Road and drive 5.5 miles. Make a left on High Point Road. When High Point Road meets Sickle Hill Road after 3.8 miles, turn right and follow Sickle Hill Road for 1.6 miles to Fawn Lake Road. Turn right on Fawn Lake Road and drive to the parking lot at the end of the road near Fawn Lake. Begin the hike by following the trail as it leaves the upper end of the parking area on a snowmobile trail. After a slight ascent the trail begins to descend to a trail intersection at about .5 miles. Here a trail to the left branches off to White Birch Pond. Stay right on the Long Path and cross a stream on a bridge. At .8 miles the trail comes out to gravel Partridge Run Road. Turn right and walk down to Ravine Road at almost exactly one mile. The trail turns left and follows Ravine Road for a couple hundred feet before turning right again on Partridge Run Road. Continue on Partridge Run Road which is in pretty good shape but would require a high clearance vehicle to access. At 1.3 miles you may want to walk off the main trail to the right to inspect a waterfall on Partridge Run. At 1.6 miles Partridge Run Road turns to the right and descends to cross a bridge over the stream. The Long Path heads slightly left and comes to an open area. Continue passed a gate on the road and then a small pond on the right. A snowmobile trail comes in from the left. Continued ahead to a fork in the trail and bear left. The trail begins to ascend to an escarpment above Partridge Run. Unfortunately there are no viewpoints along the trail. At 2.4 miles intersect another woods road and begin to follow it until the trail turns off the road. The blazes are very clear in this area. At one point a switchback takes you along a wall of rock and then to a higher level on the escarpment. At 3.9 miles begin a switchbacked descent to the Switz Kill Valley. At 4.4 miles start to follow a woods road that parallels the edge of a field. The trail breaks out into the last field on your descent and straight ahead is the Gifford Hollow lean-to. This lean-to was finished in 2012 as an Eagle Scout project. At 5.1 miles make a sharp right and walk along the edge of a field to Gifford Hollow Road at 5.3 miles. Make a left turn onto the road and hike out to Switz Kill Road at 5.5 miles. You may now turn around and retrace your steps or try another return route. Turn around and walk back on Gifford Hollow Road passing the point where the trail intersected the road. After .75 miles, there is a sign for the Partridge Run Wildlife Management Area. Look closely when you get to this sign as what is left of Partridge Run Road turns to the right here. As you walk it is clear that at some point the stream was high enough to wash out a large part of the road. You may want to walk down to the streambed to get a closer look at the work the stream has accomplished. At about 7 miles there is a sign that says "Bridge Closed Ahead". The bridge is intact but has seen better days. At 7.2 miles cross the bridge and continue on the road until another bridge at 7.7 miles. Walk up a little hill and you will be back at the point where you were earlier in the hike just below the waterfall. Continue to walk west on Partridge Run Road until at about 8 miles you can see another waterfall on the stream below. You may want to visit this one as it has an unusual conformation. There is a drop of about 8 feet over a solid rock wall. Water shoots out from two places that have worn more deeply than the rest of the rock. Climb the bank to the road and continue out to Ravine Road. From this point on simply follow your route from earlier back to the parking area at Fawn Lake. where we had just turned around and see how e felt at that point.


(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ferncliff ForestTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficulty 2.0 mi. 285 ft. GPSies

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Ferncliff Forest is a privately owned nature and historical preserve near Rhinecliff, NY. The land at one time was owned by the Astors. Presently it has a nice pond, two lean-tos, some ruins, and a tower. The tower is an International Derrick that was relocated from South Carolina several years ago. From Rhinecliff head south on River Road. When the road splits, bear left on Mount Rutsen Road and park in the first lot on your right. From Rhinebeck head north on Route 9. Turn left onto Montgomery Street which becomes Mount Rutsen Road. Drive about 1.8 miles from Route 9 and park at the lot on your left. From the parking area follow the wide road to the pond. There may be brochures at the kiosk near the parking area but maps are hard to come by. East Tower Trail and West Tower Trail both go to the tower but are NOT well marked. Follow a trail or some paths north from the pond and then west and you should run into East Tower Trail. Follow this to the tower. The tower has some fantastic views of the Hudson River, Kingston Rhinecliff Bridge and the Catskills. There are some interesting building below and on the western shore of the river. There is no view from the hill without climbing the tower. Once you have taken in the views and taken some pictures, return to the ground and head south on the West Tower Trail. Heed the sign along the way that tells you to return to the parking area by the Circle Trail. The Circle Trail brings you to the shore of the pond. You may turn left or right to get back to the road that leads back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Apex Bridge to Chase Brook RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.1 mi. 570 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The last section is the one described here and is mostly a road walk from The parking area on Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) near Round Pond to the eastern terminus of the trail 1.2 miles from the Denning trailhead.

This hike works well with a car spot since the round trip is over 10 miles one way! Depending on where you are coming from there are a number of ways to get to Chase Brook Road where you will park one car. Chase Brook Road is about 7 miles south of Walton on Route 10. You can also take the Cadosia exit from State Route 17 and go north on Route 268 to Route 10. Where Route 268 meets Route 10 is the beginning of the hike where you will park the second car. Park a car in the parking area where Route 10 meets Chase Brook road. Drive in the second car back to Route 268 and cross the Apex Bridge. park near the stop sign on the right side of the road but do not block the access to the reservoir road. Cross the road to begin the hike. The first .7 miles of the hike winds through mixed hardwood and evergreen forest gaining about 360 feet in the process. Some of the trail is one old woods roads. At the .7 mile mark you can walk off the trail to the right to a small ledge with a limited view. Back on the main trail a very short walk will bring you to a had left turn. You are now on the railroad bed of the Ontario and Western railroad and will stay on the rail bed for some time. You will immediately notice that you are passing through a rock cut and that there are no visible drill marks on the rock. The quarrymen who made the cut used the natural fissures in the rock. Near the end of the cut on the right side is a stone wall laid up to hold the bank in place. The rocks are covered with moss but the workmanship is still evident. For the next 2.5 miles you will be walking along the flat and straight rail bed. It can be wet in places but the trail is well marked. If you keep looking to the left you will see the foundations of a springhouse around the 2 mile mark. The water here is plentiful and clear. At 3.25 miles the trail leaves the railroad bed to the right and crosses a stream on a small bridge. This was necessary since the railroad crossed a trestle in this area and the trestle is no longer there! After this point the railroad bed has collapsed in several places but the trail is easy to follow. You will cross two more bridges. The last bridge is a kingpost bridge over a small stream that swells greatly with heavy rain. At 3.85 miles you will be approaching Chase Brook Road. Watch for FLT signs pointing to the left. Turn left and walk downhill to an old road. At the T, turn right and follow the old road. This can be difficult since the blazes are few and far between and the knotweed has overgrown the trail in many places. After you clear the knotweed, you will come to a grassy area and will see a gate at the top of a small hill. Walk up to the gate and across Chase Brook Road. Then trail continues on the other side and will take you to the end of Chase Brook Road where you parked a car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the one-way hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Apex Bridge to Fletcher RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.3 mi. 2480 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The last section is the one described here and is mostly a road walk from The parking area on Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) near Round Pond to the eastern terminus of the trail 1.2 miles from the Denning trailhead.

This hike works best with a car spot since the round trip is over 12 miles! Parking one car at the end of Fletcher Road and beginning the hike at the Apex Bridge is one option. The hike described here is a loop using some roads on the return trip. Depending on where you are coming from there are a number of ways to get to Fletcher Road where you will park one car. Perhaps the best way to get there is to take the Cadosia exit from State Route 17 and go north on Route 268 to Route 10. Where Route 268 meets Route 10 is the beginning of the hike where you will park the one car in the lot at the end of the bridge. Drive south on Route 10 about 2 miles and turn right on Dryden Road. Drive north on Dryden Road and turn left after 1.5 miles on Finch Hollow Road. Turn left on Fletcher Road which is a gravel road that turns to a woods road with enough clearance for most cars. Park near the end of the road. When you get back to the Apex Bridge and are parked in the lot, walk across the road, turn left and walk north on Route 10 a very short distance to the first section of guardrail. This is where the trail starts! The beginning of the trail is rather steep but it soon levels off and begins to descend a little. The trail rolls through some gullies and finally at 1.25 miles turns left onto the woods road that once acted as an access road to the tower. The climb to the tower is steep in places but the crew who constructed the trail built in a few switchbacks to help. Over the next 1.5 miles you will be headed due north gaining a total of over 1400 feet from the parking area. The difference in elevation from the point where you turned onto the woods road is over a 1000 feet and several ascents are more than a 25% grade. At 2.8 miles you will be at the base of the tower. The bottom flights of stairs have been removed from the tower to discourage anyone from ascending and the cab is in disrepair. There is a plan to restore the tower which would be a wonderful project. The next part of the trail heads passed the tower and starts to descend. Although the trail generally loses elevation there are times when it climbs again. At about 3.1 miles the trail joins a dirt road and follows it to a bluestone quarry at 3.4 miles. Stone is still being cut here but it is not in operation every day. Continue on the road through the other side of the quarry. Soon there is a turn to the right which may not marked but is pretty obvious. Continue to follow various woods roads for the most part. Occasionally the trail will cut through the woods to get to the next road. At 3.7 miles the trail heads south instead of west and remains on then ridge where the elevation is still over 2100 feet. At 4.2 miles the trail again turns west and begins a steep descent toward Faulkner Road. Over the next .7 miles you will lose 750 feet of elevation for an average grade of 25%. You will reach the junction with the previous trail at 4.9 miles. The trail is now marked with blue blazes. Continue straight ahead on the main trail. You will descend and cross Faulkner Road at 5.4 miles. Continue across the road on the trail and follow it through some wet areas until it eventually meets Dryden Road at about 6.0 miles. Turn right on the road and walk to a Y. Turn left on Finch Hollow Road and walk short distance before turning left on Fletcher Road. This gravel road now begins an ascent and eventfully turns into a woods road in good condition. You will pass only one house on the way. A stream flows on the left side of the road. Walk about .75 miles on Fletcher Road gaining over 400 feet until you emerge in an open area where you may have parked another car. The Finger Lakes Trail goes straight ahead and into the woods. This is your turn around point if you do not have another car. Turn around and walk back down Fletcher Road, turn right on Finch Hollow Road and right on Dryden Road. At 9.4 miles you will reach the point where the trail enters the woods on the left side of Dryden Road. Continue on Dryden Road for another .8 miles until it meets Route 10 at 10.3 miles. Turn left on Route 10 and walk south on the wide shoulder for 2 miles back to your car at the Apex Bridge parking area. This return route is MUCH easier than the hike out as it is only 4.5 miles instead of 7.7 miles and is primarily downhill or flat.

(The map above shows the parking area and the round trip hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Arctic China SFTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.1 mi. 1360 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot, as an out and back or a loop with road walk. The route described here is the loop! Take exit 84, the Deposit exit, on State Route 17. Drive north about 9 miles on Route 8. Watch for signs for Steam Mill State Forest and a parking area on the right. The Finger Lakes Trail crosses here and you will start your hike by crossing Route 8 and walking just slightly to the right. The Finger Lakes Trail is not well marked here but you will pick up the blazes once you walk down the bank. After a short walk through the trees, the trail meets a woods road which takes you down to a stream crossing. A rat5her impressive bridge will get you across the stream as you enter some evergreens on the other side. The trail initially heads south and then west but eventually turns north and heads for Shears Road. For the next .7 miles the trail continues to gain elevation and heads south. At just over 1 mile into the hike it swings west and continues to climb to 1.5 miles. From here the trail descended gradually to an area near Dunbar Road where there is a camping area. When you come to a gate in the middle of the woods, turn right at the Y and you will eventually see some white blazes. The blazes on this entire section of trail are very old. Some blazes are covered by brush and in many areas there are quite far apart. The trail starts to gain elevation to 2.35 miles at which point it starts to drop. At 3 miles you will pass a sign explaining that the area had been planted with hardwoods in the 1903's to create a mixed forest. The hardwoods have now taken over and the softwoods ware being logged to create a hardwood forest. There is an open area on your left from the logging. The trail drops from about 2100 feet to 1650 feet over the next mile as it descends into China Ravine. The ravine itself is wide and impressive but has only a small stream running through it. There is a single plank "bridge" across the stream. Cross the stream and head up the trail parallel to the ravine. By now you will be headed north and the ravine will soon be behind you. The trail gains almost 500 feet over the next 1.2 miles. At times you will be walking through a pine forest with many smaller trees springing up on the forest floor. The smaller trees are crowding the trail and can be a little prickly. There are few if any blazes along this part of the trail. At about 4.5 miles you will enter some hardwoods and a grassy area. Again there are no blazes even when the trail came to another Y. Head right and down a hill toward Shears Road. I found one blaze along the way. When you break out onto Shears Road you may notice that there is no sign to indicate that there is a trail and the "mouth" of the trail has overgrown. Just across from the trail is room for one car on the side of the road. Turn right on Shears Road and walk .75 miles downhill to Route 8. Just after the sign for Arctic State Forest you will see when the Finger Lakes Trail enters the woods on the left along a road and heads north to Masonville. When you get to Route 8 turn right and walk the 1.35 miles back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the clockwise loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Bainbridge to Case RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.3 mi 925 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot but the round trip hike is only 5.3 miles! The route described here is a an out and back! There is no parking on Case Road which is why the hike starts in Bainbridge and proceeds 'backwards". The biggest problem with this hike is that the trail is VERY poorly marked. Trying to follow the blazes can be frustrating in BOTH DIRECTIONS! Go to Bainbridge and park in the municipal parking lot near the old train station. Walk northwest on Route 206 using the village sidewalks and then the shoulder of the road. At .7 miles turn right off the road at the "Welcome to Bainbridge" sign. The trail descends to Newton Brook which should be easy to cross except in the highest water conditions. The small gorge that the brook has carved here is interesting. After crossing the brook the trial begins to ascend the steep bank on the other side through a series of short switchbacks. At about 1 mile the trail meets a woods road and turns left. Initially the trail is highly eroded but once it flattens out the surface becomes easier to walk. The blazes are initially placed at and appropriate distance but the further you go the fewer they become. At around 1.5 miles the trail breaks out into an open meadow and the blazes...completely disappear! Walk nor more than twenty feet on the path and then cut through the weeds to the left where there may or may not be a path. Walk to the treeline and look for white blazes in the woods. If you are lucky, you will pick up the blazes and be able to follow them! The trail initially skirts the meadow passing through the trees at the edge. It then turns left on a woods road and descends again to Newton Brook at 1.8 miles. The brook is even smaller in this location. After crossing the brook the trail ascends the far bank, wanders through some trees and emerges on a woods road where it turns left. BE SURE to mark this spot in your mind as the blazes on the return trip are hard to spot! Continue on the woods road for about .5 miles to 2.4 miles where the trail turns left off the road and descends to Case Road. Be prepared for some VERY muddy spots along the road as ATV usage is high in the area. At Case Road turn left and walk downhill for about .2 miles to where the trail meets the road coming from the other direction. You will have walked about 2.7 mile if you did not make any wrong turns. At this point you may reverse course and head back to Bainbridge. You may also take the high water bypass route by continuing to walk down Case Road for .1 miles to the junction with Route 206. Turn left on 206 and walk 1.6 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Bainbridge to MasonvilleTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 16.1 mi 1695 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike should be done with a car spot since the round trip hike is 16.1 miles! The route described here is a loop using roads for the return trip! Go to Bainbridge and park in the municipal parking lot near the old train station. Walk southeast on Route 206 crossing the Susquehanna River and coming to the traffic circle. Continue through the circle staying on Route 206 and passing under I-88. The trail will cut off to the left just after a yellow house on the right about a mile into the hike. The trail goes through a field and then begins to ascend a hill. You will pass a trail register as you climb the hill. At about 1.25 miles you will to a power line right-of-way where the trail all but disappears. Depending on the season there can be some difficult weeds to push through accompanied by some nasty thorns. At about the time you will want to give up toy will come to an access road to the power lines where the vegetation diminishes. There are few markings along the way. At about 1.6 miles you will come to the top of the climb near a hill labeled "Camel's Hump". The trail follows an access road which cuts under some of the power lines and then parallels another. If the day is clear you should be able to see a nice view of the river valley and the Sidney Airport. The traffic you hear is on I88. Follow the access road under the power lines. until you start to descend a little. At 2.3 miles the trail turns south off the access road and begins to ascend.T his part of the trail is "highly eroded" and quickly deteriorates into a streambed with steep banks. You can try walking on the narrow path along the high banks but both side are undercut and the path often collapses. The best plan may be to give up and simply walk in the streambed. After .85 miles and a gain of 450 feet the trail levels off and becomes a woods road. The road heads due east toward Neff hill Road with a few small ascent and descents. At about 4 miles into the hike, the trail ends on Neff Hill Road where you should turn right. The rest of the hike will be all on roads! Walk up a small hill and then start a descent to Highland Acres Road at 4.7 miles. A brief uphill walk brings you to a right turn on Houck Road Extension. The next turn is a left on Houck Road. Over the next 1.2 miles you will drop about 400 feet to Butts Road. Along the way there are some nice views of the countryside. Turn left onto Butts Road at the bottom of the hill to head into Masonville. At the junction with Route 8 turn right to head toward Masonville which is 1.2 miles away. As you approach Masonville, turn right on Church Street and walk to the footbridge over Masonville Creek. Walk across the bridge and to the end of Church Street. Turn right on Route 206 and head back to Bainbridge. At 11.6 miles you will be at the intersection of Butts Road and Route 206. The rest of the hike back to Bainbridge is mostly downhill. There were some nice views along the way. At 15.1 miles you will at the point where you turned into the field to follow the trail much earlier in the day. It is about a mile back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Baker Schoolhouse Road to Telephone RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.8 mi 1250 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 6.24 miles one way for a total of 12.8 miles. The route described here is loop and is all road walking! Take Route 26 north from Whitney Point. When Route 41 splits off from Route 26 follow it north and west for about 4.8 miles. Watch for Baker Schoolhouse road on the left. Turn left and drive about .2 miles east to where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Turn around and park on the south shoulder of the road. The trail through the forest is closed after one mile so head east on Baker Schoolhouse Road toward Route 41. The road is a back road but there can be quite a bit of traffic. The first .8 miles are slightly uphill while the final 1.5 miles is downhill. Turn left on Route 41 and headed north on the wide shoulders. The next 3 miles are almost flat and the road is very straight. At 5.2 miles you will be at the junction of Route 41 and Telephone Road near Solon. Turn right onto Telephone Road and walk uphill for about .7 miles where the road levels and then starts to go downhill a little. For the next .8 miles the road descends to the point where the trail enters the woods. If you have a car parked here, your work is done. If you have only one car, turn around to start back. At the intersection continue straight ahead through Solon on Route 41 to start a loop rather than a simple out and back. In Solon you will pass by the Hathaway House which was built in 1844 by Major-General Samuel Gilbert Hathaway, the manor house was the hub of his eight thousand acre estate as well as his political career. The mansion looks as it did for more than 150 years. The General built well with walls of stone 2 feet thick. Today it is a catering house. From the intersection it is another 1.8 miles along straight and flat Route 41 to Stillwell Road. Make a left and immediately start another climb which lasts for about .6 miles until the road levels and then starts to descend to the intersection with the McGraw Marathon Road. Make a left and hike only about a quarter mile before turning left again on Baker Schoolhouse Road. Hike a little more than a mile uphill back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Basswood Rd to Cooper Schoolhouse RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.9 mi 1450 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is almost 6 miles one way for a total of 11.9 miles. The route described here is out and back with a little variation thrown in! Take Route 41 north from Afton and continue through the intersection with Route 206 where the road designation is now Route 27. Watch for Basswood Rd on the left at about 5.5 miles from the Route 206 intersection. Turn left and drive .2 miles to where the Finger Lakes Trail meets the road. Park just east of the trailhead on the south side of the road. The first part of the hike proceeds east for about .75 miles on Basswood Rd and Brookbanks Rd to the corner of Puckerville Road. At this point you can decide to stay on the main trail or take the high water bypass as there is no bridge over the creek on the main trail. To take the bypass turn right on Puckerville Road hike about .6 miles to where the trail cut into the woods to join the main Finger Lakes Trail. For the next 2.9 miles the trail passes through mostly hardwood forest and gains about 500 feet. The trail may not be well used and the blazes are faded so as to be almost invisible in some places. There are several wet areas where old half log bridges and some corduroy are positioned to try to help. Both of these can be very slippery. In one area the trail passes near a large field where the trees are few and far between. This has allowed the prickers and the ferns to take over to make the trail virtually disappear. This combined with the lack of blazes makes following the trail very difficult. Eventually the trees return and it becomes easier to follow the trail. You will pass through some fences that have openings with boards over the top to restrict the height of what can easily pass through. At 4.25 miles you will be at Shapley Road which has a small trailhead and a kiosk for Wiley Brook State Forest. When you cross Shapley Road, you will enter Wiley Brook State Forest. The trail looks more used here and it passes through a large stand of conifers which reduces the undergrowth. Hike up a hill and the trail levels off and eventually joins a well-defined woods road. Within .5 miles from Shapley Road, there is a blue-blazed spur trail on the right which leads to a bivouac area near Mud Pond. Continue on the woods road until about 5.3 miles where the trail leaves the woods road to the left. The turn is marked butt is easy to stay on the road and miss it. If you arrive at an open field, you missed the turn! After another .65 miles on the trail, you will meet a grassy road at about 6 miles. Turn right and walk .2 miles before turning off the road and back onto a trail. The trail only last for .2 miles before meeting Cooper Schoolhouse Road. Turn right and walk .2 miles to the corner of Cooper Schoolhouse Road and the Case-Guilford Road which is also marked as Town Line Road. Turn around and retrace your route back to Shapley Road. From Shapley Road you may continue on the trail back to the car. You may also turn left on Shapley Road and walk .1 miles down to Puckerville Road. Turn right and follow Puckerville Road back to Brook Banks Road, a distance of only 2.5 miles. Turn left on Brookbanks Road and walk the remaining .7 miles back to the car. This avoids rehiking some of the least interesting parts of the trail but is best done when the sun is NOT beating down on you. This route is 6.5 miles out and 5.4 miles back.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Beers Brook Road to Chase Brook RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.1 mi. 570 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The last section is the one described here and is mostly a road walk from The parking area on Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) near Round Pond to the eastern terminus of the trail 1.2 miles from the Denning trailhead.

Depending on where you are coming from there are a number of ways to get to Beers Brook Road where you will park your car. Beers Brook Road is about 5 miles south of Walton on Route 10. You can park directly across from Beers Brook Road or in the parking area slightly further north. Walk across Route 10 and listen for gunfire on the shooting range just off Beers Brook road. If you hear shooting walk south on Route 10 watching for blue blazes on the left side of the road. Turn left and follow these blue blazes to the main FLT where you should turn right. If there is no shooting, walk up Beers Brook Road for only about .1 miles and turn right on the FLT. At just less than a mile the trail goes to the left and off the old road entering a stretch of pine trees. It is usually cool in this area and the pine needles make a soft footing. At 1.2 miles the trail enters an open area and then crosses Route 10. Turn right or north on Route 10 and watch for the FLT signs. The trail wanders down to a path along the West Branch of the Delaware and the Cannonsville Reservoir. This part of the trail is pretty but also pretty buggy in season. At 1.5 miles the trail leaves the path and turns left crossing a field of tall grass and ending up at the base of the bank that forms Route 10. Walk along the base of the bank until it slowly begins to climb up to Route 10. At 1.7 miles you will again be at Route 10. Turn right or south and walk a few hundred feet until the Finger Lakes Trail sign appears on the left. The trail here cuts up into the woods and begins to get wetter and muddier. The trail for the next .8 miles rolls up and down over some little hills but continues to be wet. At around 2.5 miles you will at Chase Brook Road. To get back you can retrace your steps he the trail or walk back on Route 10. The distance on Route 10 is 2 miles and it is flat and boring! A nice option is to walk about to the first crossing you made of Route 10 at about 3.65 miles. Turn right here and go back into the woods and through the pine grove. From here retrace your route from earlier to get back to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the round trip hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Berry Hill to East McDonoughTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.0 mi 1220ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 6 miles one way for a total of 12.0 miles. The route described here is out and back with a little variation thrown in! Take County Route 10A west from Norwich for 5.0 miles. Continue on County Road 10 for another 3.5 miles. Turn left on Tower Rd and drive .3 miles to the access road for Berry Hill Fire Tower on the right. Turn right on the access road and park in the small lot near the tower. The tower is being used for law enforcement radio communications and is off limits to the public. You can climb the tower to the locked gate to get a slightly better view of the surrounding countryside. To begin your hike walk down the access road to Tower Road. Turn left and hike out to Route 10 where this section of the Finger Lakes Trail actually begins. At Route 10 turn around and hike back to the access road, passing it and continuing south on Tower Road. Walk about .75 miles to the point where the trail enters the forest. Walk through a stand of tall pines. At 1.2 miles cross Tower Road and head west briefly before turning south and crossing Preston Road at around 2.1 miles. The trail rolls a little but is mostly downhill at you walk south. Over the next 1.4 miles the trail makes several twists and turns but generally heads south and downhill. The trail seems to follow an old road and only leaves that road when it is blocked by blowdowns. There are some interesting rock formations along the way and a set of small bridges over some wet areas. There is also a larger bridge over a stream. All of these may be slippery when wet! At 3.5 miles you will arrive at one of the parking areas at Bowman Lake State Park. The trail heads down to the beach area. The park has a small but beautiful lake with a nice beach and a roped swimming area. Walk behind some buildings on the trail and follow the blazes until you are on the park road. Turn right on the road and walk to the next intersection and turn left to pass by the Nature Center. The trail actually follows the shoreline behind the concession stand and then comes up to the road. This route seems abandoned as if most people simply followed the road. Continue to follow the blazes on the road and you will eventually pass the park entrance and come to Sherman Road at 4.2 miles where you turn right. Walk about .1 miles down the road and turn left into the woods. The trail heads southwest for about .7 miles and along the way crosses Bowman Creek on a bridge made from a steel I beam. The I beam was laid on its side and spans the creek with a handrail on one side. Walk out to Bowman Road which goes south for about .8 miles and ends at Route 220 in East McDonough. Cross the road and walk through an opening in a chain link fence to cross a playground. On the other side is a woods road that begins a climb to a trail register at 6.0 miles. Turn around and go back to Bowman Road and do not turn onto the trail. Just passed the turn is a small, rural cemetery which is very old. Explore the Gale Cemetery if you wish. At the end of the road cross over and enter a path on the other side. The path brings you to the south shore of Bowman Lake. Continue along the shore of the lake and pick up the blue blazes of the Kopac Trich which runs around the lake. Continue to follow the blue blazes until they meet the white blazes of the Finger Lakes Trail behind the concession stand. Follow them back passed the beach and to the parking area where the trail enters the woods. Hike the trail to Preston Road and turn right on the road to Tower Road. Turn left on Tower Road. Walk the last 1.3 miles on Tower Road to the access road to the tower. Turn left and walk back up the hill to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Birdseye Hollow Rd to Rt 226Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.9 mi. 885 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

This hike starts on Birdseye Hollow Road north of Birdseye Hollow County Park. The route described here is only one way to approach the hike and uses local roads on the return trip. The county park is well worth seeing! Take exit 40 to Savona and get on Route 226 heading northeast. After about 7.5 miles, turn left on Rabbit Road which connects to Route 16. Turn left on Route 16 and drive 1.5 miles west to Birdseye Hollow Road on the right. Tunr right and drive north for 2.3 miles passing Birdseye Hollow County Park. At 2.3 miles the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Find a place on the shoulder to park. Cross the road and walk a little south before entering the woods to start east on the trail. The forest is an interesting mix of red pines and deciduous trees and the walk is pleasant if not particularly scenic. The trail seems to be well marked but there may be a few blowdowns blocking the trail in places. At .35 miles the trail turns south but then turns west before turning south again and crossing Rhinehart Road at 1 mile. Walk a little farther and watch for the bench dedicated to Mary Years on the left. Across from the bench is the foundation of an old farmhouse and a sign explaining a little bit about the history of the area. The trail continues south following an old woods road until 1.75 miles when it branches off the road to the right and begins to descend off the ridge. The trail has been running parallel to the road and now descends to the intersection of Munson Hollow Road and Birdseye Hollow Road at 2.1 miles. Cross the roads and follow the white blazes for the Finger Lakes Trail and the blue blazes for the park trail. At 2.4 miles there is a T in the trail where the Finger Lakes Trail turns left and the blue park trail turned right. Follow the blue blazes of the park trail as it is an "approved" shortcut. The trail comes to an area where there was a parking lot and a pavilion. The blue blazes on the trees clearly show that the trail crosses the parking lot and follows a paved walkway south of the lake. Continue on the paved path and notice lake on the right with some interesting trees and some small islands. The upper reaches are more of a wetland than a lake or pond and many dead trees are evident. You will come to a wooden causeway that spans the outlet of the lake. The middle of the bridge has a covered section. Walk across the bridge to the shore of the lake to get some nice views. When you are done, return to the blue trail as it crosses an open area and then enters the woods. The blue trail is clearly marked and very nicely maintained. There may be wet spots along the trail in wetter seasons and these are marked by the word "Wet" painted next to a set of blazes. You will soon soon arrive at Route 16. Turn right and followed Rt 16 toward Aulls Road making a left when you get there. Walk along the road and cross Mud Creek on a road bridge. Just beyond the bridge turn into the woods off the road following the trail. The trail heads east paralleling Mud Creek and at 4.4 miles the creek turns more to the east and the trail heads almost due south and back toward Aulls Road. At 5 miles cross the dirt surface of Dumak Road and walk another .3 miles to Aulls Road. Turn left on the road and walk out toward Route 226. At Route 226 turn right and walk a short distance to where the trail again enters the woods. Turn around here to begin the hike back to the car. Continue to walk the gravel surface of the road north toward Route 16 . At 7.7 miles turn right on Route 16. As you approach the point where you came out onto Route 16 from the blue shortcut trail, turn right into the woods on the main Finger Lakes Trail. The trail runs parallel to Route 16 for about .3 miles heading east and just before it turns south there is an old cemetery. The cemetery is mowed and trimmed but many of the stones are skew and some are toppled from their bases. Back on the trail begin to head a little south and start to climb the only really significant hill on the whole hike. Crossed Route 16 at 9 miles as the trail continues to climb up a ridge to a hike high point of 1280 feet. From here begin to descend rather quickly and at 9.7 miles the trail turns east and comes to Birdseye Hollow Road. Turn right or north and start back toward the car. In a short distance you will come to a left turn that leads back to the T in the trail where you turned onto the blue trail earlier. Follow the trail to the T and turn right to walk back out to the road. Turn left and head north on the road toward you car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Birdseye Hollow Rd to Winding Stair RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.4 mi. 1800 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

This hike starts on Birdseye Hollow Road just north of Birdseye Hollow County Park in Steuben County, NY. The route described here is a straight out and back with about 8 miles of road walking. Take exit 40 off Rt17/I86 toward Savona and get on Route 226 heading northeast. After about 7.5 miles, turn left on Myers Road which connects to Route 16. Turn left on Route 16 and drive 1.5 miles west to Birdseye Hollow Road on the right. Turn right and drive north for 2.3 miles passing Birdseye Hollow County Park. At 2.3 miles the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Find a place on the shoulder to park. Walk west into the forest into the forest. The trail almost immediately crosses a stream on a set of two bridges. Walk through mostly hardwoods and be prepared to climb up to the top of a ridge. Over the first .9 miles the trail gains 375 feet with an average grade of 8%. At least the last part of the return trip is downhill! At 1.2 miles the trail crosses Urbana Road with a slight jog to the south. The land on the other side of the road is private property but the owner allows hikers on the trails. The trail here is a wide lane but there are several that cross each other so watch carefully for the blazes. The trail continues to climb and at 1.8 miles it crosses VanAmburg Road. At 2 miles there is a directional sign at the site of Irene's Bivouac. Just passed this area is a leanto. Continue on the trail passing the leanto and at 2.25 miles arrive at Longwell Road. The trail now follows local roads to the turn around point on Winding Stair Road. Turn right on Longwell Road and walk a short distance downhill to Route 113. Turn left to head southwest and watch for traffic as the road can be busy. The road rolls quite a bit and is more up hill than down for some time. Continue to the intersection with Lockwood Road on the left walking passed it to continue toward Winding Stair Road. Winding Stair Road turns right after a descent and just at the base of a long hill. After turning right, start walking down the road. Walk north losing elevation every bit of the way until you have dropped 350 feet to where the Finger Lakes Trail comes out of the woods on the left. Turn around here and start back up Winding Stair Road. Since this hike is out and back simply retrace your steps to get back to your car. Fortunately the reverse direction looks a little different. There may be some opportunities to take other routes but these involve dropping off then ridge and then climbing back up!

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Black Bear RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.7 mi. 640 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The last section is the one described here and is mostly a road walk from The parking area on Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) near Round Pond to the eastern terminus of the trail 1.2 miles from the Denning trailhead.

This hike can easily be done as an out and back as the round trip is only 5.7 miles From Livingston Manor take Debruce Road which changes names from Debruce to Willowemoc to Pole along the 15 mile trip to Round Pond. When Round Pond appears on your right, turn left onto Wild Meadow Road. The road named changed from Black Bear but most people still use the old name. Drive up a short hill and park in the first lot on the right.

The hiking route is rather simple. You will now walk on the road for about 2.8 miles to the end he the "maintained" dirt and gravel road. There is a snowplow turnaround and a "Seasonal Maintenance" sign. To my knowledge there is NEVER any maintenance beyond this point! Turn around and hike back to where you parked.The out part of the hike is all uphill although it is never very steep. Along the way there are some views of the High Falls Ridge on your right. There are also several very nice hunting camps along the road.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

hike profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Black Bear to Eastern TerminusTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.9 mi. 1285 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The last section is the one described here and is mostly a road walk from The parking area on Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) near Round Pond to the eastern terminus of the trail 1.2 miles from the Denning trailhead.

This hike requires a car spot as it is almost 13 miles one way! From Route 17 (soon to be I86) get off at exit 96 and head away from Livingston Manor on DeBruce Road. Stay on this road as it changes names. In about 15 miles watch for Wild Meadow Road on your left across from Round Pond. This is where you will return to start your hike. At the end of the road turn right on the Frost Valley Road and continue to the end of the road. Turn left on the Claryville Road and drive all the way to the end of the road. From Route 28, turn onto the Frost Valley Road (Route 47) and continue on this road passed Panther and Slide Mountains. Pass the Frost Valley YMCA and continue to the end of the road and turn left on the Claryville Road. Drive all the way to the end of the road. From Route 55, turn north on the Claryville Road in the hamlet of Curry just outside of Grahamsville and drive all the way to the end of the road. Park one or more cars at the Denning trailhead and then drive back through Claryville. Turn right on the Frost Valley Road and drive about 1.5 miles taking a left turn onto Pole Road. The first road to the right across from Round Pond is Wild Meadow Road. Drive up the road and park in the first large parking area on the right. This is where your hike begins.

The hiking route is rather simple. You will now walk on the road back to where you parked at the Denning trailhead! The hike goes quickly since it is a road walk. Once you are through Claryville the road will eventually turn to dirt. There is at least one farm along the way and several picturesque streams. As you near the end of the road there is a slight uphill. At the Denning trailhead, continue passed your car and walk out the woods road at the end of the parking area. Walk about 1.2 miles along this trail to the junction with the trail to Table Mountain. Notice the sign for the eastern terminus of the FLT. Take a picture and return to the Denning trailhead.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Bleck Rd to Carson RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 14.3 mi 2095 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 14.3 miles round trip and has some significant elevation gain. The route described here is a loop using roads for the return trip! Take exit 9 on I-81 and head west on Route 221. In about 11 miles turn right on Babcock Hollow Road. In 1.8 miles bear right onto Bleck road and drive about 1 mile. Watch for the Finger Lakes Trail sign on the left side of the road. Turn around and park on the west shoulder of the road. Cross the road to begin your hike by walking up a small hill through some pines. Within less than a quarter mile the trail splits with the blue Kuzia Cutoff going left. Stay to the right on the main Finger Lakes Trail and it will soon cross Cortwright Road. The road is a woods road and the trail parallels it. The road acts as a high water bypass as the trail makes several stream crossings which may be difficult. The mileage is almost exactly the same. Turn left on the road and continue uphill for about 1.2 miles where Baldwin Road comes in on the right. At this point Cortwright Road starts to be more navigable and the main FLT comes in from the right. Continue on the road for another .2 miles to 1.6 miles where the trail crossed the ditch on the right on a small bridge and then starts an ascent of 1.2 miles to the top of the Greek Peak Ski Area. The trail heads generally northeast with a few twists and turns and even some slight descents on the way. At about 2.75 miles you should be able to see the ski lifts from the trail. You may want to walk over to the lifts to get a view to the north. Return to the trail to begin the walk to Virgil Mountain, the highest peak in the area. The drop between the two peaks is just over 100 feet. Pass the highest point which has no views and descend to a power line. There are views from here but none are spectacular especially since the power line dominate the views. Turn right to follow the right-of-way. for about .2 miles where a sign indicates that the main Finger Lakes Trail turns to the left. The yellow blazed Virgil Mountain Trail turns off to the right. Turn left to stay on the Finger Lakes Trailand get ready for the steepest descent of the day. You will lose 800 feet in the 1.3 miles from the turn to Tone Road at the bottom of the mountain. The trail at first heads ESE but at 4.5 miles turns northeast and the descent becomes steeper. At some point you will come to a steam boiler on the right side of the trail. Some stories mentioned that it is from a railroad engine but it was more likely part of a stationary installment. Continued to descend to Tone Road making a stream crossing just before the road. Walk north along Tone Road which runs parallel to Route 392 but on the other side of Gridley creek. At 6 miles cross the creek on a road bridge, turn left and walk up the road a few hundred feet to Carson Road. Turn right and hike uphill for 1 mile to the wide spot in the road where the trail enters the woods on the left. Immediately turn around and walk back Route 392. Turn right on Route 392 and walk west for 3.2 miles to Vandonsel Road. The route is almost flat and the shoulder of the road is wide although the traffic is always well above the speed limit. Very soon after starting out on Route 392 pass the Greek Peak Ski Area. There are lodges and a convention center and chair lifts that climb the hill. There was also a small zip line! Pass a small convenience store on the left and continue until you get to Vandonsel Road on the left. The road climbs to near the top of the ridge to the right turn onto Bleck Road. Turn right onto Bleck Road which continues to climb before a descent to the car. There is no way to avoid this climb of about 420 feet. It isn't a steep climb but you may be tired by this time. When you finally hit the top and start down it is only a short distance back to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Bleck Rd to Owego Hill RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.7 mi 1585 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done as an out and back as it is only 7.7 miles round trip. Take exit 9 on I-81 and head west on Route 221 for about 11 miles to Babcock Hollow Rd on the right. Turn right and drive north to where Bleck Road branches to the right. Turn right and drive about 1 mile to where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Park on the wider shoulder on the west side of the road. Begin the hike by entering the woods on the west side of the road and walking down an incline to a stream crossing. There is no bridge and the crossing can be difficult when the water is high. Parts of this trail can be very slick and slippery when they are wet! There may be standing pools of water, areas where the trail is more of a streambed and many areas of slick mud. At about .5 miles ascend a hill and find a view to the south. Just after this view is the Foxfire lean-to on the right side of the trail. Descend a little just passed the lean-to and then began an ascent to the top of a small hill. From there descend 240 feet through some switchbacks to Babcock Hollow Road. Cross the road and continue to descend to another stream crossing which lacks a bridge. On the other begin a 1 mile switchback as you head toward Hilsinger Road. The direct route is only .2 miles but has an elevation gain of 350 feet! A sign just before the switchback warns that there are steep areas ahead that can be slippery when wet! The sign mentions that there are ropes on the steepest parts. There are 3 ropes but hiking poles may be enough. Parallel Hilsinger Road for some time until at 2.5 miles the trail turns toward it and reaches the road at 2.6 miles. It is barely a road at this point. From Hilsinger Road to Owego Hill Road is only .5 miles but the trail covers 1.25 miles of switchbacks to get there. There doesn't seem to be any need for the wandering back and forth as the grade on the direct route is more than manageable! Along the way on the Finger Lakes Trail there are several different side loops which are marked in different colors. At 3.65 miles is the highest point of the hike at 2032 feet on top of some unnamed hill. From here descend to Owego Hill Road at 3.9 miles. Turn around and begin to retrace your steps back up the hill and then down through the switchbacks. It is possible to walk down Hilsinger Road to Babcock Hollow Road and then north to Bleck Road and your car but it adds a lot of mileage. Again, when crossing Babcock Hollow Road you may walk south to the junction with Bleck Road but this route adds some distance but may be quicker under certain conditions. The shortest distance back to your car is to follow the trail being careful on some of the steeper descents.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Boylan Road to Stevenson Forest PreserveTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.9 mi 1480 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot but is only 9.9 miles round trip. The first 3.5 miles is on trails while the last 6.4 miles is on local roads which makes the walking easier. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 through Candor and Spencer. Route 96 eventually picks up the designation as Route 34. North of Spencer turn left on Newfield Depot Road and follow it into Newfield. Watch for Trumbulls Corners Road and continue to head west. Trumbulls Corners Road changes to Blovsky Hill Road but that change which occurs at a four-way intersection may not obvious. Blovsky Hill Road ends at an intersection where you should bear right on Carter Creek Road. Somewhere along this route the paved road turns to gravel. After less than a mile watch for Lloyd Starkes Road on the right and enters the Connecticut Hill Wildlife Management Area. This road is marked "Seasonal Maintenance" and is passable but very rough. At the end make a hard left onto Boylan Road. This road is dirt and gravel but in pretty good shape until the intersection with Hulford Road where there is another "Seasonal Maintenance" sign. Fortunately, the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road just beyond the intersection. Park on the right side where there is room for two cars or on the wide shoulder on the left. Begin your hike by crossing the road and walking southwest on the road to enter the woods on the right. The trail is very well marked and seems well used. Start by heading northeast and descending to Connecticut Hill Road which is reached at .7 miles. Cross the road and turn right to walk east a bit and then turn left or north into the woods again. At 1.3 miles the trail heads due north along a property line and then turns due west at 1.7 miles continuing to follow a private property line on state land. Continue uphill and northwest to cross Tower Road at 2 miles. At 2.2 miles pass over the summit of Connecticut Hill which at 2100 feet is the highest1 spot on the Finger Lakes Trail for 40 miles around. From the top of the hill head northeast and continue to descend crossing Cayutaville Road at 2.75 miles. Turn right on the road and walked southeast briefly before reentering the woods and heading north toward Griffin Road. The trail turns right on Griffin Road at 3.45 miles and from here to Stevenson Forest Preserve the trail follows local roads. Follow Griffin Road east and then north to where it intersects Connecticut Hill Road at 4.1 miles. Continue north on Connecticut Hill Road to 4.6 miles where Rumsey Hill Road turns right. Turn right and follow Rumsey Hill Road east dropping 300 feet in .6 miles. At the intersection with Trumbulls Corners Road turn left and walk .35 miles to the parking area for Stevenson Forest Preserve. You are now at the lowest elevation on the hike at 1250 feet and the rest of the hike would be mostly uphill. Turn around and walked back up Trumbulls Corners Road heading south and gaining some elevation. At 6.2 miles follow the road as it makes a left turn and follow it again at 6.5 miles when it makes a right turn heading south. At 7.5 miles turn right on Cayutaville Road and follow that only .1 miles uphill before bearing left on another version of Connecticut Hill Road. At 8.8 miles pass by the intersection with Lloyd Stakes Road and bear left on Boylan Road. These roads are mostly gravel and dirt but Boylan Road is a little rougher. The walk along Boylan Road is about a mile and this is where you gain the final 300 or so feet to the elevation of you car. Continue uphill passing Hulford Road on the left and finally arriving at your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Braley Hill Road to Old 76 RoadTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.5 mi 2097 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 10.5 miles round trip but it can easily be done as a loop using local roads for part of the return trip. The route described here employs that method. Take I81 to the Whitney Point exit, exit 8. Follow Route 79 west from Whitney Point toward Ithaca for a little over 20 miles and then turn left on Boiceville Road. After .6 miles, turn left on Central Chapel Road and then stay to the right on Braley Hill Road after 2.6 miles. Pass by the first big parking area on the left which is marked for Shindagin Hollow State Forest. Park in the next parking area on the left. Head south on Braley Hill Road for only 250 feet before turning left into the woods on the Finger Lakes Trail. The trail descends slightly to cross two small streams and then a larger one at .2 miles where there is a bivouac area. At .7 miles cross a jeep trail and continue across to the other side where you will pick up the white blazes again. Continue to descend, passing an old foundation at .8 miles. The trail makes a sharp right after this and we begins to parallel Shindagin Hollow Road some 200 feet above it with a steep dropoff to the left. At 1.5 miles begin to descend off the ridge to the road. When you come to the road at 1.8 miles you will be at the lowest spot on the hike at about 1180 feet. Turn left and walk about 500 feet up the road where you should turn right and cross the stream on a bridge. From here the trail begins to ascend again on logging road. Several of the turns are simply not marked at all so watch carefully for the blazes! At 2.5 miles enter the area surrounding the Shindagin Hollow lean-to. The area is large including the lean-to, a privy and several fire rings. The trail passes in front of the lean-to and parallels a stream. Just after the lean-to is a small cascade which tumbles over some exposed bedrock. The trail has been heading us north but now turns east and continues ascending to South Road. Along the way there were two interesting arrangements of stones. One is almost a stone wall incorporating a downed tree. The other is a large cairn. Continue on to South Road. Cross the road to a nice country lane which is wide and well-maintained. At 3.4 miles you will be at the highest point on then hike at almost 1800 feet and you will start a long descent toward Old 76 Road. At 3.6 miles the country lane ends and the trail turns to the right and continues almost due east. Continued to descend to 4.7 mile where you cross Boyer Creek on a bridge. Continue to head east and descend to Old 76 Road at 4.9 miles. Walk across the road to connect with next section. Turn around and hike back to South Road on the trail. At 6.6 miles turn right on South Road and hike north .4 miles to a left turn on Gulf Creek Road. The road heads due west and then south for 1.7 miles to Shindagin Hollow Road. It also drops over 500 feet which must be regained to get to your car. Turn left on the road and hike back to where the trail heads back up the ridge retracing your route from earlier. There are three climbs to get back to Braley Hill Road with the first being the most sustained at 340 feet. As you approach the parking area you can continue back on the Finger Lakes Trail or turn right on the blue trail which brings you out to the road just north of the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Burdett to Texas Hollow RoadTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 13.5 mi 1960 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 13.5 miles round trip. The "out" is 9.5 miles but the "back" is only 3.5 miles on local roads which makes the walking easier. Take State Route 17 north toward Binghamton to exit 64 at Owego. Head north from there on Route 96 through Candor and Spencer. In Spencer pick up Route 34 west to Van Etten. Turn right onto Route 224 as Route 34 heads south. Follow Route 224 for 19.2 miles as it passes through Cayuta crossing Route 13. Drive through Odessa and just outside of Montour Falls turn north on Schuyler County Route 8. Follow Route 8 for a little more than 3 miles and then turn left onto Route 9 which intersects Route 79 after 1.2 miles. Turn right and you will be in Burdett after less than a mile. Park at the fire department and village hall after asking permission or turn right at the blinking light and park at the post office. Walk to the blinking light and head north on Willow Street. At .65 miles Willow St continues on through a twin tunnel. One tunnel was for the road and the other for the stream that ran beside it. The tunnels were necessary because a railroad once ran over the road and perpendicular to it. Turn left or west on a farm lane before the tunnels which are impossible to miss. The lane is flat for a bit and then begins to climb as it turns north. At the first split in the lane stay to the right and begin to walk up toward a group of farm buildings. At about a mile another "road" goes off to the left. Turn here onto this old railroad bed and walk northwest for some time before finally spotting a faint white blaze. The railroad bed is in poor shape with large ponds in places and very muddy areas which are hard to avoid. The trail turns off the bed at 1.5 miles and heads first northeast and then due north. Upon entering the woods the trail immediately begins to gain elevation and is well-marked and obvious. Soon you will break out of the woods and hike through some abandoned vineyards. At 1.8 miles turn left and begin heading north to 2.2 miles where the trail makes a right turn to the east. Walk along some fields with views of the Catharine Valley behind and at 2.5 miles reach Slattery Hill Road. The description on the Finger Lakes Trail map mentions "views to the north and west of Seneca Lake" but there are none. Cross the road and walk through some more fields and vineyards before entering the woods. You are now well within Finger Lakes National Forest. From the road head generally south with a few jogs to the east as the trail descends to Tug Hollow Creek. At 3.7 miles crossed the creek twice and walk along it as it became deeper and wider. At 3.85 miles cross the narrow bridge and turn right. Walk uphill and cross Logan Road at 4.3 miles. On the other side of Logan Road is a "gate" and a small kiosk explaining the Finger Lakes Trail. The forest from Logan Road to Burnt Hill Road is primarily hardwood and there are some very large trees along the way. The trail ascends from the road and follows a small stream on the right heading ENE to about 5 miles where it crosses the stream and begins heading southeast. At 5.3 miles descend some and cross an impressive streambed that is often dry. After a slight ascent cross Burnt Hill Road the first time at 5.5 miles. Walk directly across the road entering the woods and continue to ascend to 5.6 miles where a long descent begins. At this point the orange blazed Interlocken Trail comes in from the north and a little farther on a side trail heads left to the Dunham lean-to. Continue on the trail heading almost due south losing elevation as you go. The trail passes through more red pines and at 6.25 miles the trail turns west to head for Burnt Hill Road again. The forest becomes more open and the trail may begin to be overgrown. At 6.6 miles turn left on Burnt Hill Road and continue to descend. The walk down the road to Route 79 is pretty easy and at 7.5 miles you will be at Route 79 after dropping over 600 feet. Turn left and walk along Route 79 for .15 miles before turning right on South Hill Road. Walk about .3 miles on the road. and at 8 miles turn left onto a farm lane. The turn is well marked and there are even some blazes on the trees that are to the left you stay on the north side of some fields while heading east. Continue to head east toward Texas Hollow Road going uphill to 8.3 miles where the trail turns south but continues to rise. The hardwood forest are pleasant as the trail continues to parallel Texas Hollow Road heading southeast but more than 300 feet above it with a steep drop off to the left. At 9.1 miles the elevation of the trail is 1550 feet and the trail begins to descend. At 9.25 miles the trail turns sharply and heads due north to Texas Hollow Road. There are several small switchbacks but the descent is very steep in places. Near the end walk down a driveway to the road. The trail crossed the road and then turns right to parallel the road for .35 miles to the access road that leads down to a pond. At the access road, turn right to walk up to Texas Hollow Road. Walk north to Route 79 for 1.25 miles with a slight uphill at the beginning and then a slight descent. Turn left on Route 79 and begin the 2.4 mile walk back to the car. The route is almost all downhill and passes by some interesting houses, a cemetery and a horse stable. At the blinking light in town, turn left and walk back to the firehouse to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Carson Rd to West River RdTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.7 mi 940 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot but it is only 9.7 miles round trip. The route described here is a loop using roads for the return trip! Take exit 9 on I-81 and head north on Route 11. In about 4 miles turn left on Route 392. In 4 more miles make a sharp right turn on Carson Road and drive about 1 mile. Watch for the Finger Lakes Trail sign on the left side of the road. Turn around and park on the north shoulder of the road. Head out on the Finger Lakes Trail through Tuller Hill State Forest. The trail starts north through some hardwoods and climbs a little hill before descending down the other side. Around .85 miles the trail turns east and continues to descend. At 1.45 miles you will come to the edge of a stream called Neal Brook and pass the Woodchuck Hollow lean-to where the trail turns again to head north. For the next mile the trail follows the brook north climbing a little until, at 2.5 miles, it turns east and shortly thereafter crosses the Cortland Nine Road. The soil in the area has a large percentage of clay and can be very slippery especially when wet. Some of the little stream crossings have descents that are very steep and equally challenging climbs out of the stream bed on the other side. After crossing the road, the trail continues to ascend but now heads east. At 3.1 miles the trail turns north toward Snyder Hill which is not much of a climb. At 3.8 miles you will come to a cleared spot at the upper end of Pipeline Road. Watch for the blazes along the right edge of the clearing. Continue to descend a little heading northeast until you cross Snyder Hill Road at 4.25 miles. The trail turns northwest and parallels the road before heading northeast and crossing a brook. From this point on you will hear the traffic on I-81 and on a clear day you can see Hoxie Gorge Bridge. You will approach a field, walk along the edge and then return to the woods to walk parallel to another stream. The blazes here are a little confusing but you should be able to spot their general direction. The trail continues to descend as you approach West River Road and even passes through the backyard of a private residence. When you reach West River Road turn left and hike northwest on West River Road for about .3 miles gaining elevation as you go. Turn left on Stafford Road and hike another .4 miles to Snyder Hill Road. Turn left on Snyder Hill Road and hike about 2.3 mile trip south passing over two small hills. At 8.5 miles Snyder Hill Road veers to the left but continue straight ahead on Carson Road. There are several nice farms along the way, some interesting private residences and evidence of some logging operations. Carson Road eventually makes a 90 degree turn to the right and after that you will soon be back at the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Comfort Road to Fisher Settlement RoadTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.3 mi 1780 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 12.3 miles round trip. The return trip is on local rods which makes the walking easier. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 and Route 96B. After passing the "Welcome to Danby" sign watch for Bald Hill Road on the left. Turn left and continue for about .7 miles before making a right on Lieb Road. At the end of Lieb Road turn left on dirt and gravel Comfort Road. After only .2 miles the Finger Lakes Trail joins the road from the west. Turn around and park in a wide spot on the east side of the road. Start your hike by walking south on Comfort Road for a mile. After a mile, turn left into the woods at a clearly marked turn. Cross Bald Hill Road at 1.4 miles and immediately re-enter the woods on the other side. The trail passes through both hardwood and pine forests. There were several stands of red pine that were obviously planted at some time. At 1.9 miles the Chestnut lean-to will be on the left. Just after the lean-to the trail turns sharply right and comes to a logging road. Continue directly across the logging road and descend to a left turn onto a woods road as you approach Michigan Hollow Road. Cross Michigan Hollow Road and continue heading south crossing washed-out Smiley Road and a small stream. The trail begins to climb from 1290 feet at the road to 1630 feet at 4.1 miles where the trail turns east. On the way there are a few ups and downs. Cross Hill Road at 4.2 miles and descend to a small stream. After a short ascent, cross Curtis Road at 4.7 miles and again descend to a stream. This stream is wider than some in the area and has a bridge. The stream has been rerouted since the near end of the bridge is in the water. After crossing, turn right to pick up the blazes. Just after the stream, the trail turns northeast and then, at 5.3 miles, heads due east. Pass through some red pines while ascending and then began to descend to Fisher Settlement Road. The trail here may be wet and muddy and is bordered by briars and wild roses. The trail meets the road at 5.9 miles. Turn right to walk to the beginning of the next section of trail. Start your return trip by walking north to South Danby Road and heading north to Hill Road which roughly parallels Route 96B. At 6.7 miles turn left on Hill Road and get ready to ascend. The walk to the next intersection is 1.2 miles and is pretty evenly divided between uphill and then downhill. At the intersection with Curtis Road turn right on Curtis Road and walk out to Route 96B. This road also rolls some with an initial descent and then a short climb. The road starts to drop sharply at about 8.6 miles and there is a nice view of the valley below. At Route 96B turn left and walk a little over a mile to Bald Hill Road. Turn left and start to walk toward Lieb Road. Before making the right turn on Lieb Road, take a minute to view Jennings Pond on the left which is part of Buttermilk Falls State Park. Continue your walk back to the car by turning left onto Lieb Road and making a left at the end onto Comfort Road.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Comfort Road to Fisher Settlement RoadTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 13.9 mi 1983 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 13.9 miles round trip and has some steeps spots especially in Lick Brook Gorge. The return trip is on local roads which makes the walking easier. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 and Route 96B. After passing the "Welcome to Danby" sign watch for Bald Hill Road on the left. Turn left and continue for about .7 miles before making a right on Lieb Road. At the end of Lieb Road turn left on dirt and gravel Comfort Road. After only .2 miles the Finger Lakes Trail joins the road from the west. Turn around and park in a wide spot on the east side of the road. Start your hike by walking across the road to pick up the trail as it heads west from Comfort Road. The trail may initially wet and descends to an abandoned road. After this, the trail follows a contour line without gaining or losing much elevation until it turns north at 2.4 miles. You will drop a little to Bruce Hill Road at 2.7 miles where the trail and turns left to briefly follow the road until turning into the woods. Shortly after entering the woods there is a double tree trunk and a large tree beyond it. After this make a slight swing to the east to avoid a deep gully formed by a tributary to the Cayuga Inlet. Come out of the woods into a field where the next blazes are not obvious. Walking across the upper part of the field and through an opening to the next field. Walk along the hedge row and pick up the white blazes on the far side. When you come to the next set of fields, you will have the same problem except there is a blaze on a tree near the middle of the field. After that blaze, there are no others you can easily spot. At the far side of the field turn right and walk along the west side of the field next to the hedgerow heading north. If you look carefully, you may see one or two old, faded white blazes. Watch for views to your left or west as the hedgerow thins. When you come to the edge of the field, cross a road or driveway and to a woods road. This is the end of Town Line Road which is grass at this point. At 4.25 miles Then line Road intersects Layen Road. Both Town Line Road and Layen Road are gravel covered at this point. Continue walking down Town Line Road losing elevation as you go. The road was absolutely straight as you cross West Jersey Hill Road on your 1.5 miles trek. Arrive at the point where the road curves to the right and continue to follow it as it crosses a bridge over Lick Brook. This is the Sweedler Nature Preserve owned by the Finger Lakes Land Trust. From the bridge you can see a deep gorge cut by this little brook. This is a popular destination with several different trails. Just after the bridge turn left at 5.9 miles to follow the Finger Lakes Trail down through the gorge. There are several small falls and many interesting rock formations along the gorge. At 6.2 miles pass by the upper falls without a good view. Just after this the Finger Lakes Trail heads away from the gorge to take a slightly less steep route. The blue Lick Gorge Trail stays to the left along the gorge. Turn right to follow the Finger Lakes Trail. You will return on the blue trail. At 6.3 miles a short spur trail on the left connects the two trails. Turn a little to the right here to follow the Finger Lakes Trail across a stream and to continue your descent along a spit of land that is between Lick Brook on the left and another stream on the right. At 6.7 miles make almost a 180 degree turn to the left and head down to Lick Brook again. The trail passes the bottom of the lower falls and which is largely hidden from the trail. Continue along the trail to the edge of Cayuga Inlet which can be deep and wide depending on the recent rainfall patterns. If you feel you can cross the stream without problems, you should have water shoes and a bag to keep your pack dry just in case. The railroad bridge that crosses the stream is a private bridge. Although there are no signs, crossing it is trespassing. This is the lowest point on the Finger Lakes Trail at about 425 feet! Since turning off the road and into the gorge area you have lost 650 feet and are over 1100 feet lower than where the car is parked. On the other side of the stream hike out to a field and continue to follow the blazes to a large parking area on the east side of Route 13. The blazes continue under a bridge across Enfield Creek. Follow the blazes to the other side then turn around and head back. Turn right after the lower falls on the blue trail. The distance to where the blue trail meets the Finger Lakes Trail is only .25 miles but in that distance the trail gains 350 feet for an average 24% slope. On the way up you may walk to the edge of the cliff and get a view of the lower falls. Farther up the trail where it starts to level out, there is a glimpse of the upper falls through the trees. Continue up to the road and turn right to start the road walk back on Town Line Road. At Layen Road turn left to walk the roads back to the car instead of taking the trail. Walk uphill on Layen Road for .6 miles and turn right onto Jersey Hill Road. The roads are very straight which makes the distances seem longer. Pass Hilltop Road on the right. After 1 mile look for left turn onto Gunderman Road. Once you turn onto Gunderman Road and watch for Comfort Road on the right. After .9 miles turn right on Comfort Road and watch for the junction with Lieb Road after about .8 miles. Your car is only .2 miles away but up a small hill.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Cooper Schoolhouse Rd to Case RdTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.6 mi 940 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot but it is only 7.6 miles round trip. The route described here is a loop using roads for the return trip! Take Route 206 west from Bainbridge and watch for Case Road on the right. Turn onto Case Road and follow it to where it crosses Searles hill Road and turns to gravel and dirt. Drive to the intersection with Town Line Road and continue straight ahead to Cooper Schoolhouse Road. Park on the corner on the right side of the road. Walk southeast on Town Line Road for about .1 miles before cutting right into the woods on the trail. The next .6 miles of trail can be wet in spots but you should be able to get around or through them without too much trouble. The next .7 miles to Case Road is about the same as you climb a small hill and then hit the road. Turn right on Case Road and follow the blazes on the road for about .15 miles until the trail again cuts into the woods on the left. Over the next .9 miles the trail drops some elevation to cross Searles Hill Road and then gains it back to again cross Case Road all the while heading generally south. There are a few places along the way where the blazes are spaced apart and a few others where the weeds can be high. After crossing Case Road again the trail skirts a field and then runs along the edge of the field and some lawns. It re-enters the woods and at about 3.4 miles starts to parallel Newton Brook. The crossing of the brook at 3.6 miles should not be a problem unless the water is VERY high. Continue to walk along the brook and at 4 miles cross it again on a bridge. The trail leads to a field and then back onto some woods roads until it again met Case Road at 4.3 miles. Turn left on Case Road and use it to get back to the car. You are at the lowest point on the hike so the first part of the walk up Case Road is uphill and you will gain almost 400 feet in 1.4 miles to the point where you last crossed. Along the way watch for the point where the trail enters the woods and heads for Bainbridge. Within .5 miles, cross Searles Hill Road where Case Road turns to gravel and dirt. The next 1.5 miles is generally downhill but rolls a little.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Fisher Settlement Road to Heisey RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.0 mi 1334 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot but it is only 8 miles round trip. The return trip is on local rods which makes the walking easier. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 and Route 96B. After passing through Candor watch for South Danby Road on the left. Turn left and drive about 1.3 miles to Fisher Settlement Road. Turn right and drive another .3 miles to where the trail enters the woods on the left. Turn around and parked off the road on the grassy shoulder. Start your hike by walking into the woods on the trail heading generally east toward South Danby Road. Descend for .25 miles to South Danby Road and after crossing it began an ascent of about 300 feet over the next mile. At 1.3 miles the trail turns almost 90 degrees left and heads north toward Route 96B. Descend slightly and then climb to the highest point on the hike at 1760 feet at the 2 mile mark. Just after this the trail turns slightly to the left and a spur trail goes to the Tamarack lean-to. Several parts of the trail travel through impressive stands of red pine that were obviously planted at one time. They are very tall and very regularly spaced. Over the next mile to Route 96B you will lose 560 feet heading north. There are some steep places and a few may be slippery with mud. Cross the road and pick up the trail as it turns right to parallel the road for .2 miles. The short section of trail ends at Durfee Hill Road and a sign post marks a turn to the right back out to Route 96B. A section of trail at the top of Durfee Hill Road has been closed by the landowner and the trail has been rerouted. At Route 96B turn left and walk along the shoulder for .2 miles to Heisey Road. Turn left and get ready for a climb since over the next .5 miles the elevation gain is about 435 feet to the highest point on Heisey Road. Hike down from the high point to the intersection with Eastman Hill Road. There is room to park one or two cars but the last part of Heisey Road is very washed out and would require some careful maneuvering in a vehicle. Turned around at 5.8 miles and walk back down Heisey Road to Route 96B. Turn right on Route 96B and walk 1.4 miles to South Danby Road. Turn left and walk uphill for 1.25 miles to Fisher Settlement Road. Turn right and walk the final .3 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Grover Brown Rd to Berry HillTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.4 mi 1520 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 6.8 miles one way for a total of 13.6 miles. The route described here is out and back with a little variation thrown in! By returning on roads the distance back is cut by 1.3 miles. Take County Route 23 west from Norwich for about 11.5 miles toward North Pharsalia. Watch for Grover Brown Road on the right which may not be marked. If you come to the intersection of Route 23 with FreStewart Road (right) and One Eye Street (right), you have gone too far. Drive up paved Grover Brown Road passing the "Seasonal Maintenance" sign where a gravel/dirt surface starts. The surface is good without too many dips or holes but you may not want to try it without an all-wheel drive vehicle. At about .6 miles from Route 23 the Finger Lakes Trail meets the road. Drive a little farther, turn around and park where the trail meets the road. To begin the hike walk .6 miles down Grover Brown Road to Route 23. Turn right and walk .7 miles along the shoulder to Fred Stewart Road on the left. This road heads south to Route 10 which is your destination. The Finger Lakes Trail, however, leaves the road several times to enter the forest. Walk south on Fred Stewart Road for .6 miles, turn right on Center Road and then make a quick left back onto Fred Stewart Road. The road at this point has a gravel surface and a "seasonal maintenance" sign but is in good shape. After walking another .1 miles, turn right into the forest. The trail surface is pretty flat with only a few rocks. In about .8 miles you will meet an old CCC road. After a short walk you will enter a clear cut area not mentioned on the map! The trail may be overgrown with prickers which flourish in the sunlight. The trail can be hard to follow in many places and there are few blazes to guide the way. The trip through the clear cut is actually short and after that you will enter an evergreen forest. When you meet the CCC road, turn left and hike along the road for .3 miles to the point where the Finger Lakes Trail leaves the road on the right. The trail now is wider and cushioned by pine needles. You will come to a stone wall where the trail turns right and just after this, at 3.6 miles, is a stone bench dedicated to Ed Sidote. Mr. Sidote chose this place. He is #3 on the FLT End-to-End list and has served the Finger Lakes Trail Conference as president and in many other capacities. Just after the bench is a stone foundation on the right. Cross the road and continue downhill to the CCC road where you will turn right. After .3 miles on the road, the trail again enters the woods on the right. Over the next 1.3 miles the trail ascends and descends a small hill staying parallel to the road until meeting it again at the intersection with Hoag-Childs Road. At this point the rest of the hike is a road walk to North Tower Road. Fred Stewart Road is now paved and the walk is downhill for .5 miles to Route 10. You will pass Dave Markham's machine shop where water is available. At Route 10 we turn left and start to walk east to North Tower Road. Route 10 is busy and has no paved shoulders for walking. It does have good sight lines so that you can get out of the way when cars or trucks are coming. The walk is mostly up hill for .8 miles to the intersection with Tower Road. If you have parked another car at the Berry Hill Fire Tower, Walk south on Tower Road for .3 miles to the access road to the fire tower. If you are by yourself, you must turn around and retrace your route back to your car. To save some distance, you can hike back all the way on Fred Stewart Road. The walk is pleasant as the road is mostly dirt and gravel and is very lightly traveled. This saves about 1.3 miles! The hike back on Route 10 was quick and we made good time back to the road intersection. I decided that we would walk back all the way on the road since it was easier to walk and had a dirt and gravel surface. It seemed that this route would also save some distance as it was absolutely straight. As we hiked the insects returned but were manageable. I kept Sheila on her leash as we had met several trucks along the way. In 1.2 miles we were at the point where the trail crossed the road and we continued north crossing the CCC Road. In another 1.3 miles we were at the point where we had first entered the woods. Along the way we passed another area where the trees were "disturbed". I stopped to take some pictures but could not decided whether this was a clear cut area or was caused by some other "disaster". We walked back out to Center Road and turned right and then left to follow Fred Stewart Road back to Route 23. From here we simply retraced our steps to Grover Brown road and then to the car. The final uphill on Grover Brown Road was easier than I thought it might be. We were back at the car at 2:10 PM having covered 12.4 miles in 4.5 hours. The vertical gain was over 1500 feet but most of this was on the roads. The trip out on the trail was 6.8 miles while the return journey was 5.5 miles saving 1.3 miles and a little over 20 minutes as I had hoped.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Gulf Road to Boylan RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.5 mi 1420 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot but is only 10.5 miles round trip. The first 8.8 miles is on trails and dirt roads while the last 1.7 miles is on paved local roads which makes the walking easier. Flooding early in the summer of 2015 washed out the bridges over Cayuta Creek on the main Finger Lakes Trail. It may be possible to cross the creek in drier weather but this route follows the Van Lone Hill alternate route. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 through Candor and Spencer. I continued on Route 17 to exit 64 at Owego and headed north from there on Route 96 through Candor and Spencer. In Spencer take Route 34 west to Van Etten. Turn right in Van Etten onto Route 224 when Route 34 heads south. Follow Route 224 for 14.7 miles as it passes through Cayuta crossing Route 13. Just short of 15 miles on Route 224, turn right to head north on Route 10 for 1.6 miles to Route 6. Turn right on Route 6 and drive about a mile to Gulf Road. Park on the shoulder of Route 6 just before Gulf Road. Start your hike by walking down Gulf Road. After a short distance on Gulf Road, the Finger Lakes Trail turns to the right to enter Cayuta Gulf. Stay to the left on Gulf Road and begin to climb Van Lone Hill on the dirt road. The road is well-maintained and has several houses. Eventually the road comes to a dead end. Continue to follow the orange blazes as they enter the woods. It is clear that the road once continued over the hill. At .75 miles reach the highest point on the trail at 1700 feet and immediately begin to descend the other side. The trail follows a deep creek bed that typically has only a trickle of water. The creek eventually crosses and then recrosses the road. From the amount of stones that are piled up it is obvious that this small creek has at times been filled to overflowing with a huge volume of water. At 1.6 miles reach Schoolhouse Road heading due east. Although the road is dirt and gravel it is in good shape. After .6 miles, turn right on Todd Road where Schoolhouse Road ends and start a slight descent. Cross a tributary of Cayuta Creek on a road bridge. Todd Road begins to ascend to the point where the main Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. This crossing is clearly marked and at 2.6 mile turn left onto the trail as it passes through the woods on an old road. After entering the woods, the trail crosses several open areas with high grass and weeds which may not be trimmed back.The trail heads north and east and climbs some the whole way. At 3.25 miles the trail follows a well-established woods road heading due east. The blazes are few and far between but the road is very easy to follow. At about 3.8 miles watch for a turn to the left off the road. The blazes may be hard to see! The trail parallels the road heading east but may be drier and better maintained. At 4.1 miles cross another dirt road as the trail starts heading north. Many of the dirt roads in the Connecticut Hill Wildlife Management Area are called Connecticut Hill Road! Continue north on the trail and cross Cabin Road at 4.4 miles. The trail rolls some but continues to gain elevation as it heads north toward Boylan Road. At 5.9 miles hit the highest point on the hike at 2014 feet and then start to descend toward the road. The trail crosses an open area where there is no indication of where to go. You may find a narrow green strip across the open area which leads to the road. Turn right on Boylan Road and walk east to where the trail reenters the woods. From here turn around and head west on Boylan Road and turn left where it intersects the next dirt road. After a few hundred feet turn right on another dirt road. This road continues west to Route 6 which is a paved road. However, the road ends after a short distance and becomes a woods road until it again turns into a dirt road near Route 6. The route is pretty easy to follow as long as you continue to head west. The road has a gate that is sometimes shut and locked. Walk along the road for about .6 miles where, at 7.25 miles, the dirt road ends. From that point on follow the woods road west as it passes through woods and then open fields. The track is pretty easy to follow but was badly rutted in many places. Soon the road becomes more consolidated. Come to a stream where there was once a bridge. Cross the stream on the rocks. At about 8 miles the road becomes a "maintained" dirt road again which is marked as Van Loon Road on both maps and GPS. At 8.8 miles turn left on Route 6 and start south toward the car. The road passes by the eastern shore of Cayuta Lake. There are no views of the lake as the road is farther from the lake than it appears on the map and there are trees blocking the view. The walk south on Route 6 back to the car is only 1.7 miles.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Heisey Road to Braley Hill RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.7 mi 1878 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is probably best done by parking on Ridgeway Road and hiking to Heisey Road and then back. After that, hike to Braley Hill Road and then back from there. Blackman Hill Road and Heisey Road are both in poor condition which makes parking at the true beginning of map 18 very difficult. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 and Route 96B. After passing through Candor begin to look for Willseyville Road on the right. Turn right on this road and then right again onto Coddington Road. Drive north 4 miles, turn right on Ridgeway Road and park on the wide shoulder. Start your hike by walking back out to Route 96B and turning right to head north for about .15 miles. Turn left on a woods road after only about .15 miles. After only a short distance, another woods road goes off to the right but you should stay left and climb the hill. The trail begins a steady climb at about a 15% grade over the next .25 miles. At .42 miles there is a sharp turn to the left onto another woods road and the turn may be poorly marked. After a short distance on this road, the trail makes an abrupt turn to the right. The trail follows various woods roads of which there are many so watch the blazes carefully. A viewpoint over the Willseyville Valley is marked on the map but there is no viewpoint there anymore. At 1.1 miles you will be at the highest point on Eastman Hill having gained over 600 feet since leaving the car. So far the trail should be mostly dry but you may begin to encounter wet and muddy areas of the trail as you approach Eastman Hill Road. At 1.45 miles turn left on Eastman Hill Road which is little more than a path and walk to the intersection with Heisey Road. Turn around and walked the 1.5 miles back to the car. Continue the hike by walking northeast on Ridgeway Road for only a few hundred feet before turning right into a clearing which looks like a small park. Turn left into the woods after only a few hundred feet. The trail follows a woods road but eventually leaves the road and winds through the woods making a sharp right at about 3.5 miles. You are now descending slightly and heading southeast. At 3.85 miles turn right on a flat railroad bed which was once part of the Lebanon Valley Railroad. Begin to walk along the level bed between two wetlands. Take advantage of any opening on the left to get a good view of the extensive wetlands. At 4.4 miles the blazes indicate a sharp left turn into the woods and lead you to a field where the blazes all but disappear. Turn left and walk east to White Church Road along the north side of the field. Cross the road and walk along the north edge of another field without the aid of blazes. At 4.8 miles the trail curls around the back edge of the field to the right and blazes indicate a left turn. Follow the trail as it crosses a stream on a wooden bridge. Continue on to a grassy clearing with white blazes on stakes. The trail enters the woods and is sited on a woods road which it follows as it climbs the hill heading almost due east. Several roads cut across the trail and the blazing could be better in some places. At 5.75 miles the trail reaches 1680 feet which is a climb of about 700 feet from White Church Road. As you continue to Braley Hill Road, the trail drops about 150 feet over .4 miles. At this point you are at about 6.2 miles. Turn around and follow the trail back over the hill to White Church Road. Turn right and head north toward Ridgeway Road. The road gains a little elevation but the alternate path along open road is a welcome change. After walking about 1.2 miles on the road, turn left on Ridgeway Road at about 8.9 miles. Looking ahead the road descends to a low spot and then ascends again to the car. The low point is the old railroad bed. and the ascent to the car is actually less difficult than it looks from the intersection.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Horse Camp to DownsvilleTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.5 mi. 1263 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done as a car spot as it is 6.5 miles one way! Park one car at the covered bridge park on Bridge street in Downsville, NY. Drive north from Downsville on Route 206. At the top of Bear Spring Mountain watch for East Trout Brook Road on your left. Turn left and follow this road to its intersection with West Trout Brook Road. There will be a large parking area on the right near the end with a DEC Horse Camp across the road. Park in the large lot on your right. After parking, start your hike by walking down to the road. It is possible to continue ahead into the camping area and take Trail 8 to where it crosses East Trout Brook. The problem with this approach is that the brook is often too high to cross without getting wet at the start of your hike. A better approach may be to hike about .3 miles up to the road to a snowmobile bridge on the right side of the road which crosses East Trout Brook. After crossing then bridge, take a left at the trail junction and walk a short distance to a field. Turn right and walk up the right edge of the field to begin your ascent to the ridge on Trail 12. This trail ascends to the top of the ridge over the next 1.1 miles and gains about 860 feet of elevation. At 1.7 miles you will be at the top of the ridge and there is a short side trail that leads to a lookout on the left. Take advance of the view as it is the ONLY viewpoint on the hike. The trail now levels out and actually descends some to 2.0 miles where the FLT leaves the horse trail to the right. The first few hundred feet may seem rough but soon you will join a well-defined woods road. The road mat be wet in many places and wet means insects. be sure you bring your favorite insect repellant! The road at first heads northeast and east but at about 3 miles it turns southeast and starts to descend. Over the next 1.8 miles you will lose about 1125 feet of elevation. At the bottom of the road, turn left on Route 30 and walk 1.4 miles to the stoplight in Downsville. Turn right at the light and walk down Main Street to Bridge Steep where you parked your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the one-way hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Houck Mt from Beers BrookTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.5 mi. 1950 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Take NYS Route 10 east from Walton for about 4.7 miles until you pass South River Rd on the left. Park in the parking area across the road. Walk east on Route 10 away from South River Road and after a few hundred feet turn left on Beers Brook Road. Walk about half a mile and turn right on Houck Mountain Road. The sign is hidden on the left side of the road as you make the turn. You may also see a few white blazes for the Finger Lakes Trail but these are few and very far between. Be prepared for a continuous climb over the next 1.8 miles and a gain of over 1000 feet in elevation. There are very few views especially when the leaves are on the trees but the walk is on a road which allows a good pace. After a very short descent, DOT Tower Road is a left turn. It is marked by a small Garden and a prominent sign and cannot be missed. The road rises just a little and then starts to descend to the communications towers near the top. Along the way there are several cottages or cabins and two small but pretty ponds on the right side of the road. After walking about 1.4 miles on Tower Road a sign indicates that the Finger Lakes Trail turns to the left onto some trails. Turn left here and stay on the main trail for .4 miles when the trail intersects one of the many trail in Bear Spring Wildlife Management Area. Turn to the left here to continue on the Finger Lakes Trail over Fork Mountain and into Downsville. Turn around and walk back to the main trail. If time allows, turn left and walk up to the communications towers. The array of cables is impressive. When you are ready to return, turn around a retrace your steps back to the car. The return trip is MUCH faster as it is almost completely downhill! A better way to hike this is to use a car shuttle and park one car on Route 10 and the other in Downsville or some other location.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Hoxie Gorge to Baker Schoolhouse RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.2 mi 1830 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 6.25 miles one way for a total of 12.5 miles. The route described here is out and back with a little variation thrown in! Take Route 11 north from Marathon for about 8 miles toward Cortland. Watch for Hoxie Gorge Road on the right and turn onto this road. Just after the turn is a turn around where you should NOT park. Park on the shoulder just past the turn around. Just above you is the Hoxie Gorge Bridge on I81. Walk under the bridge on Hoxie Gorge Road. After a short walk, the road splits and you should stay to the left on Hoxie Gorge Road which is a dead end. A little farther along the road enters part of the gorge as the walls of the gorge rise on either side of the road. The road apparently is frequently washed out when this small stream swells when it rains. There are several areas which show considerable damage to the road. The road begins to gain some elevation and at about .9 miles the Finger Lakes Trail leaves the road to the right and begins to parallel the stream. SUNY Cortland has a "campus" on this road where they do environmental studies and their trail is marked with yellow markers. They also have number on the markers which must correspond to the types of trees and bushes. The Finger Lakes Trail continues to follow the stream as it drops down to the stream and then veers away from it. At around 1.4 miles the trail comes to a spot where a bridge crosses one stream and water pours out of a culvert beneath it in a sort of waterfall. From this point on the trail follows the Cortland trail for a while and crosses several small tributaries. There is a good amount of walking up and down especially when crossing these small streams. The forest begins to transition from evergreens to hardwoods as the trail heads generally east and northeast. At 2.6 miles you will start walking through some brush and weeds on the edge of a field and come out on a woods road.Continue to walk north a little then northeast and then turn almost due east when you come to the edge of a corn field. As you walk along the south edge of the field you will come to a spot where the trail makes a 90 degree turn to the left at about 3.3 miles. A sign explains that the trail is closed at this point for hunting during certain times. To take the hunting bypass do NOT turn left but continue along the fields and out to Stone Road. As you walk toward the road you may find a nice viewpoint over the corn fields and surrounding countryside. Turn left and head northeast on Stone Road for about .4 miles where the name changes to Atkins Road and Underwood Hill Road goes off to the left. Continue to walk another .75 miles mostly downhill to the McGraw Marathon Road. Turn left to head north passing several small farms on the way. It is .5 miles to our a right turn onto Baker Schoolhouse Road. After .9 miles, the Finger Lakes Trail cuts off the road to the left which marks the end of this section of the trail. If you have a car parked here, you have finished your hike. If your only car is back on Hoxie Bridge Road, retrace your route back to where you are parked. When you get to the yellow marked Cortland trails, you may simply follow them out to the road. This is a nice alternative and the trails are a little better maintained than the Finger Lakes Trail. You will break out onto Hoxie Gorge Road just above where you entered the woods. Walk downhill and through the gorge on the road to get back to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Hughes Rd to Sand Pit RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.2 mi. 1430 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

This hike starts at the intersection of Hughes Road and Turnpike Road south of Howard, NY and cover the entire 12 miles of FLT Map 11! This requires a car spot or shuttle or a taxi. You may be able to get a ride from a "trail Angle" through the Finger Lakes Trail Conference but many are only available on weekends. Village Taxi in Bath charges what I consider reasonable fees so that you can park your car on Sand Pit Road and have them take you to the intersection for the beginning of the hike. Take exit 38 from Rt17/I86 to Bath, turn right and then left onto Route 415 heading northwest. After just less than a mile, turn right on Spaudling Drive and then right on Harrisburg Hollow Road at the end. After .4 miles, turn right on Sand Pit Road and park at the wide spot on the road just below or above the point where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Drop a car here or arrange for a ride to the beginning of the hike. Head back out to Route 415 and turn right and pass under 17/86. Then left onto Route 15, Knight Settlement Road. After 3.4 miles, turn right on Turnpike Road heading west. Drive about 9 miles passing a wind farm on the left just before the junction of Hughes Road and Turnpike Road. The hike starts at this intersection as you hike east on Turnpike Road down a long hill and up the other side. At the top of the hill on the road it is time to descend the other side to Craig Road at the bottom of the hill. Turn left and walk along one of the few flat spots on the hike. At about 2 miles turn right on McCaddam Road. Despite its name the road soon turns to dirt and ascends a hill between two rows of evergreens. Top the hill and turn left on Harris Hill Road. Walk downhill and at 2.9 miles turn right into the woods. The trail may be a little overgrown as it passes along the edge of a swamp before hitting a farm lane. Follow the lane for a while until the trail turns right into the woods next to the field. The trail comes out onto another farm lane, turns left and continued on it for some time. Crossed Route 69 and begin another short ascent and then begin to walk along the top of a small ridge between two stream beds. Eventually the trail drops down to another woods road. As you approach Snell Hill Road there is an archery range on the left in the woods. Walk out to the road and turn left and then right into the woods again. The trail passes through some woods between fields before finally breaking out into some fields. Follow the blazes as the trail descends to Gay Gulf Road. Turn left here and hiked downhill a little to a bridge across a stream. The trail turns into the woods and begins a slight ascent up a hill. After a short walk in the woods you will to a field where you can walk the edge near the hedgerow to get up to Robinson Road. Cross Robinson Road and head for a lone tree in the middle of a field. The trail continues along a hedgerow which is surprisingly well marked. Follow the trail through the fields by hugging the edge of the fields. The trail eventually enters the woods again. Begin a descent of over a mile dropping 360 feet to Sinclair Road. Turn left and walk out to Campbell Creek Road. Head left or north on Campbell Creek Road dropping another 100 feet. At 7.8 miles turn right onto Cochran Road and get ready for an ascent up a significant hill. At the highest point on the hill you will have hiked about .9 miles and gained 450 feet. Keep walking on the road until at 8.8 miles the road makes a 90 degree turn right and an FLT sign on the corner indicates the trail enters the field. The blazes are well-placed and visible. Follow them as they follow the hedgerow. At one point the trail passes through the hedgerow to the other side descending all the way. At the end of the fields follow the blazes slightly uphill to the left and then turn to follow them to the right under the powerlines. Descend to Knight Settlement Road after hiking 9.5 miles. The trail crosses the road and parallels it for a short distance. This section is closed for hunting season and the bypass is to simply walk down the road. Turn left on Knight Settlement Road being careful of the traffic which can be heavy on a road with a narrow shoulder. After about half a mile the shoulder widens. The road is a gentle downhill for 1.6 miles to Route 415 and passes over the railroad tracks and runs by Knight Settlement Sand and Gravel. Carefully cross Route 415 and turn right. In a short distance turn left on Spalding Drive and continue straight ahead at the next intersection on Harrisburg Hill Road. Turn right on Sand Pit Road and walked up hill to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: John Smith Rd to Fred Stewart RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.3 mi 1030 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 7.1 miles one way for a total of 11.3 miles. The route described uses the Finger Lakes Trail on the way "out" and local roads on the way "back" shortening the trip from 14.2 miles to 11.3 miles. Most of the roads are lightly traveled gravel roads except for a short (.6 mile) strip of Route 23. This hike travels over sections of the trail that were rerouted in the spring and summer of 2016. They replace some sections of the section before and after this hike. Take County Route 23 west from Norwich for about 13.5 miles toward North Pharsalia. Watch for John Smith Road on the right just after Elmer Jackson Road. Drive up John Smith Road for about .8 miles watching for a pulloff on the right for Jackson Pond. Park in the small parking area. Begin your hike my walking north on the road just slight until the Finger Lakes Trail crosses and turn right into the woods. The first mile is downhill and is the same as the previous route. At .8 miles you will pass by the remains of the old CCC camp. Some of the stone and concrete foundations are still in place. At 1.0 miles the trail meets Elmer Jackson Road. Turn right or south to follow the road to Lower Pond. There is a small dam at the outlet and exploring downstream of the dam yields some nice pictures. At this point the old route passed across the dam and headed out to Grover Brown Road. The new route continues farther down Elmer Jackson Road. Walk down the road about .6 miles and watch for the Finger Lakes Trail as it turns into the woods on the left just after the road swings to the right. The trail travels through the woods for only .4 miles when it again comes out to the road and follows it south for .1 miles until entering the woods on the right side of the road. The trail heads east and then turns south descending now toward Route 23. At the end of the descent, just before Route 23 are two bridges across Canasawacta Creek. The first is a simple flat bridge without railings. The second, spanning the main creek, is a beautiful kingpost bridge. Cross the bridges and follow the trail up to Route 23. After crossing the road, the trail climbs steeply up the bank but it doesn't last very long and soon levels out and rolls some. This is still the new reroute of the trail which avoids the road walk on Grover Brown Road and Route 23. The trail continues south over the top of a hill and down the other side crossing gravel covered Center Road at 3.8 miles. At 4.1 miles it turns east and then south again at 4.8 miles near a bivouac area. The old trail is marked in blue here and heads to the bivouac. Continue on the trail which is now the same as the old trail to Nine Mile DEC Truck Trail at 5.7 miles. Turn left and follow the road briefly before following the trail as it turns into the woods on the right. Continue to walk south and slightly downhill to 6.2 miles where the trial turns east. Much of the trail is what I call "roots, rocks, trees" and, while pretty, has no real remarkable features. The trail turns south again at 6.7 miles and you should watch for the Ed Sidote, Mr. FLT, bench on the left. This is also the point where a spur trail leads west to the Pharslia Woods Lean-to. Continue on the main trail east to Fred Stewart Road. Your trail hiking is now complete and you are ready for the return trip to the car using local roads. Turn left on Fred Stewart Road to head north. After a short distance, turn left on the DEC Road heading northwest toward North Road. Walk passed the area where you crossed the road earlier and at 8.8 miles arrive at North Road. Turn right to head north toward Route 23. At 9.3 miles cross Center Road and hit the paved part of North Road. From here descend for .5 miles to Route 23. Turn left and walked west for .4 miles on Route 23. Turn right and start the final .8 mile hike up John Smith Road to the car. Once at the car you may want to take the access trail down to Jackson Pond. The Finger Lakes Trail cuts below the dam but stay on the access trail to the dam to get a better look at the pond. When you are done, retrace your steps to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Maple Lane to Switzer Hill RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.5 mi. 1825 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

Drive south from Watkins Glen on Route 414 for 1.5 miles and then turn right and drive west on CR-16 for 5.1 miles to CR-21. Turn right and head north for 1.2 miles where CR-21 turns left. At the next intersection where Cr-21 turns right continue straight ahead on Sugar Hill Road which veins as paved and then turns to gravel. Drive 2.1 miles to Maple Lane and turn right. Drive .75 miles north to the parking area on the right.

Walk out the access road to the parking area and cross Maple Lane to head out on the trail. The first part of the trail wanders west through some red pines and then hardwoods all the while descending until it crosses a DEC dirt road at .9 miles. A downhill at the beginning of a hike feels good but means there will be an uphill at the end! The trail turns a little north and then west again as it continues to descend. The trail crosses two branches of Meads Creek which may have very little water in them. After crossing the second creek the trail begins to ascend and crossed Route 22 at 1.5 miles. The trail ascends steeply for a short time before meeting a woods road at 1.6 miles. The trail turns to the left but turn right and walk a short distance to the very old Six Nations Cemetery where there is a spectacular view to the northwest over Lake Lamoka and Lake Waneta. The stones in the cemetery are very old, hard to read and in very poor shape. Walk back to the Finger Lakes Trail which now follows a woods road slightly downhill and to the south. There are no marks or blazes anywhere to be seen but watch carefully for a turn off the woods road which occurs at right around 2 miles. The trail turns west and starts up a steep but short climb over a small hill. Hike down the other side of the hill and eventually the trail breaks out into a field. The blazes can be hard to find and require sharp eyes as there are several turns along the edges of different fields. Many of the blazes are old and the brush has overgrown them making it difficult to find the way. There is a nice view over the surrounding valleys from the high point in the fields. Finish the descent along the edge of a field and follow a woods road out to Sugar Hill Road at 3.1 miles. Just ahead on the other side of the road is a very large oak tree. From this point the trail heads due south and is very straight for some time. The trail ascends to a ridge following a woods road and is wide, well maintained and decently marked. On the initial climb you will gain 260 feet in .4 miles along a 13% grade. After this, the trail descends a little and then levels moving off the road and back onto it. You will pass one well marked snowmobile trail on the left. The trail starts to descend and at 5.1 miles another snowmobile trail appears on our left. This is the one you will use on the return trip Continue straight ahead as the trail continues south and descends off the ridge toward Switzer Hill Road. At 5.75 miles the rail turns west and continues to descend to Pine Creek. The bank here is highly eroded and you may have to look for a spot to cross safely. After crossing the creek walk out to Switzer Hill Road at 6.1 miles. Turn around and retrace your route back across the creek and up to the snowmobile trail at 7.1 miles. Turn right on the snowmobile trail and start a short ascent before the trail begins a half mile descent toward Route 22. The descent is steep at 13% and the trail descends almost 350 feet along the way. At 7.6 miles cross a bridge over Meads Creek walk out to Route 22. Cross the road and stay on the snowmobile trail heading toward Maple Lane. As you head northeast the snowmobile trail starts to climb to another ridge. The climb is not difficult but went on for .7 miles. At 8.4 miles you will come to a junction where you can turn right or left. Turn left or north on the snowmobile trail which parallels Maple Lane and heads north toward Sugar Hill Road. Do not be concerned when the trail wanders some as it will get you where you need to go. At about 10 miles the trail turns northeast and then east and parallels Sugar Hill Road until it comes to the intersection of Sugar Hill Road and Maple Lane. Cross Sugar Hill Road and begin to walk up maple Lane for .8 miles to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Maple Lane to Templar RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.5 mi. 1596 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

Drive south from Watkins Glen on Route 414 for 1.5 miles and then turn right and drive west on CR-16 for 5.1 miles to CR-21. Turn right and head north for 1.2 miles where CR-21 turns left. At the next intersection where Cr-21 turns right continue straight ahead on Sugar Hill Road which veins as paved and then turns to gravel. Drive 2.1 miles to Maple Lane and turn right. Drive .75 miles north to the parking area on the right.

Walk out the back of the parking area on the Finger Lakes Trail. The trail passes through a red pine plantation and descends a little. Several unmarked trails cross the Finger Lakes Trail but at .4 miles a blue trail with a "Lean-to" sign heads off to the right. That trail descends to the Parks Hollow lean-to. Follow the Finger Lakes Trail as it stays on contour around a hill. The trail has been heading north and northeast but at 1.7 miles it descends to cross a dry creek bed and then bends back to head first south and then east. At 1.8 miles cross the Mohawk Trail and at around 2 miles there is a sign on the right that indicates another lean-to and a pond. Continue straight ahead on the main trail. After 2 miles the trail turns south but soon swings east descending all the way. At 2.9 miles cross Route 21 where there is room to park along the side of the road. Continue heading east and descending. A caution on the FLT map indicated the stream crossing near the end of this section could be a problem if the water is high so use your own judgment. The Finger Lakes Trail maps suggest a highwater bypass using local roads. As you walk on the main trail you will come to a spot where there is a large pile of fieldstones. The trail up to this point is well-marked and maintained but after this location there are stretches with few blazes. Much of the trail in this area may be overgrown and with a few blowdowns. There are also a series of wooden walkways meant to bridge muddy areas. This section of the trail heads almost due east. Cross the abandoned part of Locust Lane at 4.5 miles but it is hardly recognizable as a road anymore. There is an old foundation in the area. Continue to head east as the trail continues to descend. At 4.8 miles the trail turns south-southeast along Glen Creek. At about 5 miles there is a viewpoint over the creek which can be almost dry when there has been no rain. This creek is the one that cut the gorge Watkins Glen. As the trail starts to turn away from Glen Creek, watch for a solid rock foundation on the left side of the trail. This is also the lowest point on the hike at 1237 feet. At 5.5 miles pass the Buck Settlement lean-to on the left side of the trail. Follow the trail along what looks like an old road and then cross a small stream that once cut a deep bed. Right after the crossing turn left on an old road. The road descends to a branch of Glen Creek where there are some picnic tables at a small waterfall. This is "Ebenezer's Crossing" but the waterfall may be only a trickle in the dry seasons. This stream has the potential of being a difficult crossing during high water. Walk up to Templar Roadand get ready for the road walk back to the car. Turn right on Templar Road which is covered with gravel. The hike on Templar Road is 1.4 miles and all of it is uphill. Continued straight ahead on Route 21 for .4 miles when Templar Road ends walking uphill on paved road. When Route 21 turns right to head north, continue straight ahead on Sugar Hill Road. Hike another .9 miles uphill before the road starts to descend. Walke another .4 miles downhill until the access road for the Perkins Hollow lean-to comes up on the right. Turn right and start to walk down the road. The access road descends to cross a small stream near the new lean-to site. There is a sign that says "To FLT". Walk uphill in the direction it is pointing heading first north and then west climbing the whole way. At about 10 miles the Mohawk Trail heads north toward the Sugar Hill Fire Tower and at 10.1 miles you will be back at the main Finger Lakes Trail. Turn left and retrace your steps from earlier in the day back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: McDonough to Stone Quarry Hill RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.6 mi 1200 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 6.3 miles one way for a total of 12.0 miles. The route described here is out and back with a little variation thrown in! Take Route 220 west from Oxford for 4.0 miles. Turn left onto Chestnut Road and drive for 1.4 miles to Corbin Road. Turn right on Corbin Road and then immediately left on Shortcut Road. Shortcut Road is mostly packed dirt with large cobbles. It is one car wide with deep ditches on both sides. You must drive about .7 miles to the small parking area and there area only a few pulloffs along the way. If you can't backup for some distance or feel the road is too rough an alternative is to park on Chestnut Road where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses and hike from there. At about .7 miles on Shortcut Road there is a woods road that crosses the road and signs for the Finger Lakes Trail. There is enough room to pull off the road and park one or two cars. When you are ready to hike, start north on the woods road toward the trail register in East McDonough. The road may be muddy in places with some ruts but this should only last for about .15 miles. The road is straight and hard packed after that and in about .9 miles you will be at the trail register where you can turn around and head back to the car. At the car cross the road and make a choice. The trail heads off into the woods on the left and a snowmobile trail goes straight ahead. The trail is shorter but the snowmobile trail offers some variety so that you will not be hiking the identical path on the way back. Stay on the woods road which is also a snowmobile trail and walk for .8 miles until you hit Chestnut Road. Turn left and head east on Chestnut Road for .7 miles where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses Chestnut Road. Turn south onto the Finger Lakes Trail and walk 2.2 miles to Ludlow Road. The trail seems little used and many blazes are faded. In several spots there are large blowdowns across the trail. Some had been there a long time and the trail is blazed around them. In other places you will have to work your way around the blockages and then try to find the trail on the other side. When you get to Ludlow Road turn left and follow it to Tucker Road. Turn right and cross the creek on the bridge. Just after the bridge, the trail turns left into the woods and follows a woods road. It is only a short distance to the blue blazed side trail on the left to the Ludlow Creek lean-to. The next landmark is a pile of rocks right on the trail. The map description mentions that the pile is of unknown origin with a suggestion of a Native American burial! The trail enters private land and the road becomes grassy and very marshy in places. When you get to an open field walk along the edge of the field outside a barbed wire fence. Within minutes you will pass by some buildings near Stone Quarry Hill Road with the road just beyond. Walk down to County Route 3 to the end of the trail section. Turn around and walk back to where the trail enters the field. Retrace your route back to where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses Chestnut Road. Cross the road and continue straight ahead on the trail. The trail passes through some conifers and then hardwoods. It is a much more direct than the route you took earlier and is only about .6 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Mormon Hollow to Fletcher RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.1 mi. 2380 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The last section is the one described here and is mostly a road walk from The parking area on Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) near Round Pond to the eastern terminus of the trail 1.2 miles from the Denning trailhead.

This hike works best with a car spot since the round trip is over 11 miles one way! The hike described here is out and back. Depending on where you are coming from there are a number of ways to get to Fletcher Road where you will park one car. Perhaps the best way to get there is to take the Cadosia exit from State Route 17 and go north on Route 268 to Route 10. Where Route 268 meets Route 10 is the beginning of the hike where you will park the one car in the lot at the end of the bridge. Drive south on Route 10 about 2 miles and turn right on Dryden Road. Drive north on Dryden Road and turn left after 1.5 miles on Finch Hollow Road. Turn left on Fletcher Road which is a gravel road that turns to a woods road with enough clearance for most cars. Park near the end of the road. Drive back down Dryden Road to Route 10 and turn right. Drive about 4.6 miles to Route 27 and turn right. Drive north 4.6 miles and park on the right shoulder near a boat launch. To begin the hike walk north on Route 27 for about .1 miles to the point where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Step over the right guardrail and walk to trail down to an old road. Turn left on the road and walk along the trail which parallels Route 27 until it meets Route 47. The trail will take you back up to Route 27 for a short distance where you should turn right on Route 47. In about .5 miles the Finger Lakes Trail will turn right and enter the woods. Watch for the white blazes as you pass through some pines since the trail is not well defined. You will soon be at the edge of Loomis Brook which does not have a bridge crossing. There is a steel cable to hang onto. If you absolutely cannot cross here there is a bypass route which is described here later. After crossing the brook you will ascend on a wide woods road for about 1.25 miles gaining around 800 feet. At the top is a nice pine grove and the trail levels briefly as you walk .6 miles on a woods road across the ridge. At 3.25 miles into the hike, the trail turn sharply right on Old Chamberlain Road. Walk down the road through the forest and then out into a field. You will arrive at Chamberlain Road at about 3.6 miles. Turn right and walk down the road for only about .1 miles. Watch for an FLT disk on a pole on the left side of the road and an FLT sign across a small field against the wood line. Cross a brook on a foot bridge and begin to be very careful about watching for the white blazes. The next section of trail is not well marked in critical places. It is also wet and muddy in spots. Walk uphill to about 4.3 miles where the trail turns right and then almost immediately right again. You will descend slightly to a woods road where you will turn left and follow the road to about 4.6 miles. You will be in an area dominated by pine trees and where the blazes seem to disappear. The trail goes up the bank on your left and hooks back on itself slightly. Once you make this left turn the blazing gets better. At 4.9 miles you will be on a height of land but to get to the end of Fletcher Road you will have to walk another .8 miles and descend 400 feet! You will come out into an open area where you may have parked a car for the return trip.

If you did not have two cars, you will have to hike back to your car by reversing your route. There are some options along the way. First you will have to turn around and climb the .8 miles and 400 feet you just descended. From the top walk down the other side to Chamberlain Road, turn right, walk back to Old Chamberlain Road and turn left to walk through the field and forest. At he right hand turn at the top of Old Chamberlain Road, around 8.1 miles you will see the blue blazes of the high water bypass route. This is the route you may use if Loomis Brook is too high to cross. Walk straight ahead and follow the bypass trail as it descends through several switchbacks on a woods road. Continue to follow the blazes for about a mile until you are on Lewis Road where you will turn left and walk down to Route 47. Turn left on Route 47 and walk towards Route 27. At around 9.85 miles the bypass trail turns left into the woods to pick up the main Finger Lakes Trail through the stand of pines. The walk lasts only .2 miles when you will be back on Route 47 so you may elect to stay on the road. Walk out to Route 27 and turn left. You may walk the road for .8 miles back to the car or follow the Finger Lakes Trail by turning left on the trail and continuing back the way you came.

(The map above shows the parking area and the round trip hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Old 76 Road to Route 79Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.6 mi 1416 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 10.4 miles round trip but it can easily be done as a loop using local roads for the return trip. The route described here is the loop! Much of this trail is unmaintained and sparsely marked. Keep a close eye on the blazes at all times and be prepared to search for the next marker. A map, compass and description of the trail is mandatory. A GPS unit is helpful. Take I81 to the Whitney Point exit, exit 8. Follow Route 79 west from Whitney Point toward Ithaca for a little over 13 miles and then turn left on West Creek Road. Eventually this road becomes Old 76 Road in Speedsville. Head northwest for 2.6 miles from the STOP sign in Speedsville watching for McGrath Road on the right. This is an abandoned road and there is little indication of its location except for a slightly wider spot in the road. The Finger Lakes Trail crossing is also poorly marked. Pull over and park on the east side of the Old 76 Road. The trail from Old 76 Road to Level Green Road is now closed by the removal of landowner permission. Walk .9 miles northwest on Old 76 Road. Turn right on Yaple Road and walk 1.2 miles northeast to the intersection with Blackman Hill Road and Level Green Road. Turn right and stay right on Level Green Road. Walk 1.1 miles southeast on Level Green Road to where the trail crosses the road. Turn left onto the trail. Start your hike my entering the woods on what is left of McGrath Road which is a rocky and usually muddy and wet mess. Continue on this "road" following whatever blazes you can until about .45 miles. Turn right onto a woods road and follow some blazes to .7 miles. The road turns right here but you should continue straight ahead on a sort of "lane". This can be hard to spot depending on the condition of the blazes and the amount of trail maintenance that has been done. At about .9 miles you will come to a to a stream and the blazes again don't help much. Turn left and cross the stream to a path that climbs a hill. There are no blazes that can be seen from the other side! The trail is now was obvious but there are only a few blazes. Enter an evergreen forest which is part of Potato Hill State Forest. The trail here it in better condition and the blazes are easier to see but little maintenance has been done. At just under 2 miles cross Level Green Road which at this point is a dirt road. Continue to walk along the trail gaining elevation slightly heading north. At 4.35 miles the trail approaches Blackman Hill Road and runs parallel until crosses the road at 4.45 miles. The trail on the other side follows a short road or driveway and then enters a field. Follow the eastern edge of the field to the northeast corner. Walk to the left or northeast along the edge of the field until you find the trail on the left. The trail begins to follow a well-defined logging road which makes several twists and turns. At 4.9 miles the trail begins to leave the logging road to the left. Be careful to follow the blazes and not the road! At 5.2 miles begin a descent that ends up at Route 79. The woods road may be wet but is a least well blazed. At 5.9 miles we begin to walk along the bank of West Owego Creek high above the water. The descent continues with a few short climbs along the way. The trail is barely etched into the side of the hill doesn't seem to get much use from hikers. At 6.7 miles turn right following the blazes toward Route 79. There is a nice bridge and a walkway over a wet and marshy area. Walk out to Route 79 and turn left to walk to Level Green Road for the trip back. It is .85 miles to the left turn onto Level Green Road. When you turn left, you will see a long stretch of rather flat road ahead. From Route 79 to Blackman Hill Road is about 1.85 miles and there is, in fact, a slight ascent of about 200 feet. At 9.5 miles we turn right on Yaple Road and continue to climb until the road begins to descend to Old 76 Road at 10.6 miles. Turn left onto Old 76 Road and walk another .9 miles to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Otselic SF to Grover Brown RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.6 mi 1200 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 6.9 miles one way for a total of 13.8 miles. The route described here is out and back with a little variation thrown in! Take the exit for Whitney Point off of I-81. Follow Route 26 north for about 29 miles passing through South Otselic. Watch for Stage Road on your right shortly after passing through town. Drive to the end of the road and turn left on Will Warner Road. The road is dirt and gravel and not maintained during the winter after a certain point. Drive 1 mile on Warner Road and you will find an access road to Otselic SF on the right. Park at the end of the road at the intersection out of the way of "traffic". Begin your hike by walking east on Warner Road for about .1 miles. Turn right into the forest and almost immediately run into some wet spots on the trail. Over the next .7 miles the trail drops over 300 feet to Thompson Brook before ascending slightly to meet Stage Road. You will have to walk back up this hill at the end of you hike if you do not have a car shuttle. As we were losing elevation I thought about the return trip knowing that I would be tired. I stopped at Thompson Brook to take a few pictures before walking up to Stage Road. Once on Stage Road we turn left and walk a few hundred feet up the road to where the trail crosses the ditch and heads into a field. Hug the left edge of the field but do not be surprised if you find only one or two blazes. Over the next 1.1 miles the trail continues to ascend but dips several times to cross streams. Most of the streams do not have bridges and several crossing could be tricky in highwater. Watch for small waterfalls along the way during periods of high water. Crossed Church Road at about 2 miles at which point the trail levels some and the surface becomes more even. Pass a trail register and then at around 2.5 miles we pass a blue blazed trail on the right to the Perkins Pond Lean-to. The trail to the lean-to is .4 miles. At 3.3 miles cross Johnson Street. The trail has gained a little elevation and you will be hiking at about 2040 feet before descending to the dam at the south end of Jackson Pond. Walk to the spillway, turn right and descend through a small filed or clearing to pick up the blazes of the Finger Lakes Trail. Follow the blazes as they cross the access road and lead you to John Smith Road. Cross the road and continue into the forest where the trail now turns east instead of south and levels off before starting to descend again. Along the way at about 5.5 miles you will pass through and old CCC camp. (Your mileage may vary since I made some errors along the way. The mileages on the Finger Lakes Trail maps seem pretty accurate.) In just 80 years the forest has reclaimed most of the buildings. At 5.7 miles you will hit Elmer Jackson Road where you should turn right. Walk down the road following the blazes until you approach a small pond with a kiosk for the Pharsalia Wildlife Management Area. Turned left and walk over the dam at the end of the pond. Note the interesting spillway underneath the bridge. Continue across the dam and take a right to follow Canasawacta Creek for the next mile as the trail drops to the creek and then ascends several times until pulling away from the creek and starting a steep ascent at 6.7 miles. At about 6.4 miles you will pass a blue trail that heads out to Bear Wallow Road where there is parking and shortly after another blue blazed trail that leads to a beaver meadow. Continue on the main trail which skirts the DEC boundary line with private property and follows a woods road. At just under 7.5 miles, you will be at the point where the trail meets Grover Brown Road. There is enough room to park one or two cars here. The road is dirt and gravel but is no worse than some of her other roads in the area. It is less than a mile to Route 23 in North Pharsalia. If you have a car parked here, you can relax on the drive back to Otselic SF. If you have only one car, turn around and follow your route 7 miles back to your car!

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Otselic SF to John Smith RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.1 mi 1558 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot but it is only 9.1 miles round trip. The route described here is out and back with a little variation thrown in! Take the exit for Whitney Point off of I-81. Follow Route 26 north for about 29 miles passing through South Otselic. Watch for Stage Road on your right shortly after passing through town. Drive to the end of the road and turn left on Will Warner Road. The road is dirt and gravel and not maintained during the winter after a certain point. Drive 1 mile on Warner Road and you will find an access road to Otselic SF on the right. Park at the end of the road at the intersection out of the way of "traffic". Begin your hike by walking east on Warner Road for about .1 miles. Turn right into the forest and almost immediately run into some wet spots on the trail. Over the next .7 miles the trail drops over 300 feet to Thompson Brook before ascending slightly to meet Stage Road. You will have to walk back up this hill at the end of you hike if you do not have a car shuttle. As we were losing elevation I thought about the return trip knowing that I would be tired. I stopped at Thompson Brook to take a few pictures before walking up to Stage Road. Once on Stage Road we turn left and walk a few hundred feet up the road to where the trail crosses the ditch and heads into a field. Hug the left edge of the field but do not be surprised if you find only one or two blazes. Over the next 1.1 miles the trail continues to ascend but dips several times to cross streams. Most of the streams do not have bridges and several crossing could be tricky in highwater. Watch for small waterfalls along the way during periods of high water.Crossed Church Road at about 2 miles at which point the trail levels some and the surface becomes more even. Pass a trail register and then at around 2.5 miles we pass a blue blazed trail on the right to the Perkins Pond Lean-to. The trail to the lean-to is .4 miles. At 3.3 miles cross Johnson Street. The trail has gained a little elevation and you will be hiking at about 2040 feet before descending to the dam at the south end of Jackson Pond. Walk to the spillway, turn right and descend through a small field or clearing to pick up the blazes of the Finger Lakes Trail. Follow the blazes as they cross the access road and lead you to John Smith Road. Turn around a retrace your route back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Route 13 to Stevenson Forest PreserveTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 15.5 mi 2133 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is !5.5 miles round trip. This is divided into the "out" which is 10 miles of trail and road walking and the "back" which is 5.5 miles of road walking. The return trip is on local roads which makes the walking easier. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 through Candor and Spencer. Route 96 eventually picks up the designation as Route 34 and they both merge with Route 13. At the point where they begin to merge there is a parking area on the east side of the road. If you cross the bridge over Enfield Creek, you have gone too far. Start your hike by walking under the road bridge along Enfield Creek and following the white blazes through a flat and damp area. Cross a park road and continue through some damp areas. Begin to climb to the rim of the gorge cut by Enfield Creek. Enfield Creek is the lowest point on the Finger Lakes Trail so some climbing will always be involved when starting there! At about a mile come to the Sierra Shelter and watch for the left turn right before it. The next section of trail may be overgrown with briars and weeds. At around 2 miles most of your climbing is done and you will have gained about 630 feet since leaving the car. you may hear the water in Enfield Creek as it flows over various cascades and waterfalls. Walked west for some time through stands of red pine and some hardwood. The trail rolls some especially when crossing small tributaries of the main creek. At 2.25 miles begin to head northwest sticking to a route that parallels the creek but well above it. At 2.9 miles start to head southwest joining a park road briefly and then entering the forest again. When you come to a Y in the trail, the main Finger Lakes Trail continues straight ahead toward the bridge of the Fish Kill. The bridge has been washed away so stay to the left and walk out to Butternut Creek Road. Turn right on this gravel road and walked first downhill and then uphill to 3.7 miles where the road joins Van Ostrand Road. After a short distance, turn right on Douglas Road and then stay to the right on Stonehouse Road. This road heads north and uphill for about .7 miles to Woodard Road at 4.5 miles. Turn right and walk less than half a mile to where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. The sign on the right side of the road announces the bridge is out and indicates it is only 3.5 miles back to the car. You have already walked 5 miles so the detour adds about 1.5 miles to the hike. Turn left into the woods and head north and northwest generally following Enfield Creek. Parts of this section of trail may not be well trimmed. The trail travels close to the creek and you can hear the traffic on Route 327 on the other side. At 5.9 miles the trail turns left and starts heading southwest toward Hines Road. Intersect Hines Road at 6.35 miles and turn right to walk due north for a quarter mile to Rockwell Road. Turn left on Rockwell Road and begin to walk due west toward Potter Hill Road. After about .75 miles watch for a trail on the left which connects to the main Finger Lakes Trail and runs parallel to Potter Hill Road. Part of the trail in this area has been closed by a landowner. If you miss the trail, continue another .25 miles to Potter Hill Road. Turn left on Potter Hill Road and hike uphill for .15 miles to where the trail crosses the road. Turn right into the woods and walk uphill to 7.75 miles where the trail makes a sharp right to head back of to the road. The quarter mile hike back out to Potter Hill Road is all downhill. Turn left on Potter Hill Road and begin to walk .5 miles north to Trumbulls Corners Road. Turn left on Trumbulls Corners Road and walk slightly uphill until you see the white blazes enter the woods just after crossing a creek on a road bridge. Turn right into the woods and watch for the blazes which go off to the left a little and then start to climb a steep pitch. The entire loop is less than a mile and has no views except for the large hemlock trees. The trail rejoins Trumbulls Corners Road at the parking area for Stevenson Forest Preserve. Turned left and walk 2. miles back to where you entered the woods. Continue on Trumbulls Corners Road passing the turn on Potter Hill Road and walking out to Route 327. Turn right on Route 327 and start the 5.5 mile return trip to the car. There are several short climbs along the way but the route is mostly downhill as you drop from about 1100 feet to 425 feet. At 13.4 miles there are no more climbs as you head downhill to Route 13. Pass the entrance to Robert Treman Park and then walk out to Route 13. Be careful crossing this busy road! Turn right and walk on the shoulder of the road back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Rt 13 to Winding Stair RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.4 mi. 2100 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

This hike starts on Rt 13 just south of Mitcellsville, NY. The route described here is only one way to approach the hike and uses local roads on the return trip. Take exit 38 from Rt17/I86 to Bath, turn right and then right again onto Route 415 heading east and south. Watch for Liberty Street on the left at a traffic light. Turn left and follow Liberty Street until it bends right and Haverling Street goes left. Bear left onto Haverling Street which become Route 13 north to Mitchellsville. Drive 4.8 miles north to where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Turn around and park on the wide shoulder on the west side of the road. We crossed Route 13 and walked through a mowed area of a field between two fields of soybeans that looked ready to harvest. The grass was wet and as we entered the shadow of the trees there was still frost on the ground. We came to the trail through the woods and started to walk along the Mitchellsville Creek Gorge. The gorge is mentioned as "very special" on the Finger Lakes Trail map description and several websites tout it as an interesting place. Many of the waterfalls are hidden by trees and are impossible to see. You may be able to get a few glimpses but good views are hard to come by! The depth of the gorge and the rock walls are impressive and it is a nice walk. At various places along the trail paths lead out to precarious viewpoints into the gorge. These are very unsafe and afford few views worth the risk. At about .9 miles the trail opens out into a field. Turn sharply left and walk down to the creek if you would like to see a very small waterfall and have a good view of the gorge walls. Walk back up to the field and turn left and walk along the edge of a field to pick up the trail as it reenters the woods. Continue to descend on the Finger Lakes Trail to an unused railroad track at around 2 miles. Turn left and walk along the track and then a trail to a bridge at 2.2 miles. Walk up to an open field and out to a vineyard. The Finger Lakes Trail follows the edge of the vineyard out to Route 88. At the road turn right and follow it out to the town hall. The trail crosses the lawn and turns right on Route 54 by the Vinehurst Motel. Just passed the motel turn left and walk along a dirt road before the trail continues straight ahead beginning the ascent of a ridge. Strangely, the trail follows one of two parallel woods roads, crosses over to the other, enters the woods on a trail for a hundred feet and then returns to the original woods road! You are now headed south or southeast and over the next .75 miles the trail gains over 700 feet at an 18% grade. The woods are now mostly hardwoods and at one point the trail comes to a field, follows the edge and then reenters the woods. At 3.9 miles the trail begins to turn north, northeast and then east. The trail rolled along the ridge never really attains the highest point. At 5.4 miles it begins to descend and a t 5.8 miles the June Big Trail heads to the north to the Glen Curtiss Museum. Continue to descend on the trail until it reaches Winding Stair Road at 6.4 miles. Turn left and start to descend to the valley. At around 6.9 miles watch for a space to open up on the right side of the road and a dirt road heading off into a field. From this spot there are excellent views of the Keuka Lake. Head down the road to Route 54 arriving at the main road at 7.5 miles. You will have now dropped 1030 feet from the top of the ridge! Turn left and began a long walk along Route 54. Fortunately the road has wide shoulders but watch out for quickly moving traffic. At 8.2 miles you will see the entrance to the Glenn Curtiss Museum with a DC-3 parked in a field. Just after the museum turn right on South Valley Road to get to Route 88 which heads back toward Mitchellsville. Follow the road and as you approach Route 88 watch for the Pleasant Valley Cemetery on the left. This is the resting place of Glenn Curtiss and a sign details his life. Turned right on Route 88 and walk about .3 miles to the intersection with Route 89. Turn left and get ready to regain all the elation you lost coming down into the valley! The road starts to climb almost immediately and it seems like it goes on forever. The valley has an elevation of 800 feet and over 1.35 miles you will climb to 1370 feet where the road levels off. Here Route 88 parallels the Mitchellsville Creek Gorge and across you can look to the trail you hiked when you first started the hike. At 11.9 miles turn left at the intersection with Route 13. Do a little more climbing to get back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Rt 206 to DownsvilleTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.0 mi. 1136 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done as a car spot as it is 7 miles one way! Park one car at the covered bridge park on Bridge street in Downsville, NY. Drive east from Downsville on Route 30. Turn right on Route 206 toward Roscoe. From the turn, drive a little over 2 miles to where the FLT cross the road and there is a small parking area on the right side of the road. After parking, start your hike by walking down the trail on the right side of the road. The trail descends until about .7 miles when it starts to climb. Several switchbacks over the next .9 miles make the 600 foot climb easier. On the ascent you will pass the Campbell Mountain lean-to on your left. At about 1.6 miles, near the top of the climb, turn right at the FLT sign and register at the box. The trail follows a snowmobile trail and relies on the red markers to guide the hiker. There are few FLT white blazes or signs on this route and, at times, you may wonder if you are still on the trail. At around 3.3 miles watch for a "Downsville" sign on the right side of the trail and turn here. Missing this sign can be easy and will leave you wondering where you are! This trail again is not well marked but remains easy to follow as it passes around he north side of a hill as it travels west toward Downsville. If you look to your right you may be able to spot the Pepacton Reservoir especially when there are fewer leaves on the trees. At about 4.8 miles, watch for a turn to the right as the LT now leaves the snowmobile trail and heads down to another woods road. There are white blazes here but you may have to look closely to see them. At about 5.5 miles the trail again turns right and down the hill to pick up another woods road. This road parallels a stream until it crosses that stream and you enter the backyard. Stay to the right and walk to the driveway of the residence. At the end of the driveway, turn left on Mink Brook Road. Walk down to Back River Road and continue straight ahead. Take the first street on the right which is bridge street. Walk down the street and over the covered bridge to the car you parked there earlier.

(The map above shows the parking area and the one-way hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Rt 226 to Sexton Hollow RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.6 mi. 1885 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

This hike actually starts on Route 17 near Moss Hill Road and makes a southern loop to Sexton Hollow Road and the returns to Route 18 to continue the Finger Lakes Trail to Route 226. If you are sure you can make the 11.6 miles, simply park where the trail crosses Route 226 and do the hike from there. Take exit 41 from Route17/I86 and turn right. Turn left on Clawson Road which shortly becomes County Route 17. After 6.6 miles, Moss Hill Road will be on the right but the shoulder is marked with NO PARKING signs. Turn around and park on the opposite side of the road as there are no signs there. Cross Route 17 to Moss Hill Road and begin to hike south on the paved surface. After only a short distance the pavement ends and the trail continues on a woods road. This road was obviously once part of Moss Hill road but is now abandoned. The trail follows the road and then veers off only to return several times. The blazes on this section of trail are very clear. There isn't much to see on the hike but the walk is all downhill as the trail heads south to the Moss Hill Lean-to. After 1.7 miles, you will be in the area of the lean-to after dropping 490 feet. A short spur trail leads to the lean-to and the blazes for the Crystal Hills Branch Trail are also visible. Of course, every descent has an ascent and the trail begins to ascend from the lean-to heading generally north and east. Again, there are no views or specific attractions. At 2.8 miles cross Dennis Road which has a dirt surface after gaining back 470 feet of elevation. The trail then begins to descend again heading for Sexton Hollow Road. At 3.4 miles the trail begins to head east rather than north and also descends a rather steep grade. There are several switchbacks that help make the descent easier. There are many side paths and woods roads in the area but the marking remains good throughout. At 3.8 miles cross a generally reliable stream. At 4 miles, you can see Sexton Hollow Road. The trail parallels the road for a short distance until it crosses the road. This is the end of the first section of the Finger Lakes Trail on this hike.

Turn left and walk .85 miles north on Monterey Road gaining elevation until you turn left on Route 17. Walk about a mile back to the intersection with Route 18. Turn right and walk a little more uphill on Route 18 to a sort of viewpoint to the south and east. The road starts to descend and at 6.6 miles turns sharply left. The trail continues straight ahead on Bozak Road which is labeled as "Seasonal Maintenance" but looks more like "No Maintenance". The gravel road starts to descend and at 7.2 miles it turns left while the trail turns right onto a woods road through the forest. The trail is still descending which means the return trip will be mostly uphill. At about 8 miles the trail comes out onto pavement near Sutryk Road but the trail almost immediately turns left back into the woods. Follow the trail as it continues to descend toward Route 226. This part of the trail is one of the few places where it does not follow a woods road of some kind. At 8.8 miles the trail crosses Route 226 which happens to be the lowest point on the hike. Turn around and retrace your route ascending all the way back to Route 18. Walk back to the intersection with Route 17, turn right and find your car a few hundred feet away.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Sand Pit Rd to Rt 13Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 13.6 mi. 2150 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

This hike starts on Sand Pit Rd NW of Bath, NY. The route described here is only one way to approach the hike and uses local roads on the return trip. Take exit 38 from Rt17/I86 to Bath, turn right and then left onto Route 415 heading northwest. After just less than a mile, turn right on Spaudling Drive and then right on Harrisburg Hollow Road at the end. After .4 miles, turn right on Sand Pit Road and park at the wide spot on the road just below the point where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Walk up the road and turn left into the woods and immediately begin to climb. Head northeast for about 1.4 miles gaining almost 500 feet and watch for some nice views as the trail alternates between woods and fields. The trail is wide and well kept following woods roads in many places and breaking out into corn fields. The views from the fields are nice but not spectacular. At 1.7 miles pass by a small pond with structure on its southern shore. Turn right and walk down the spur trail to the shores of the pond. Continuing on this trail takes you to the Hickory Hill Campground. Return to the main trail making a right turn and arriving at the Hickory Hill leanto at about 1.8 miles. The leanto has a privy, picnic table, fire ring, and a nice view of some far away hills. The trail continues north as it ascends Kershener Hill at 1820 feet. From the hill begin a descent to Robbins Road at 3.1 miles. Turn left and walk up Robbins Road for about .3 miles and then turn right into the woods. Walk along the woods road and try to find your way using the FLTC unusual trail blazes. Eventually the trail breaks out into a field and continues around the edge. You may notice an interesting set of wooden stakes on a hill in the middle of the field. Continue to walk around the field and you may see a little hut just off the trail. The structure has four partitioned stalls with a small bench in each one but the function is not clear. Continue to follow the road along the edge of the field and you will begin to get some nice views to the left. The road ascends a little hill and the views get better. Along the side of the trail are two stone benches so that hikers can enjoy the views. This is the highest spot on the hike at 1900 feet. Continue to walk along the trail on the road and turn right into the woods. There is a sheltered bench called the "Puckerbush Overlook" just inside the woods. Continue on the trail following a woods road as it passes by some houses and then comes to Ferris Road at 5 miles. Turn right and follow the road down hill and due east until it eventually becomes a woods road. The trail follows the road for some time and then enters the woods only to come back onto the road. At 5.3 miles the Bristol Hills Branch Trail heads north. The road is very eroded and hard to walk in some places. Descend to a deep ravine and follow the trail down into the ravine and across it. The ravine which was cut by Softwater Creek but now is completely dry. Walk up the opposite bank which is steep but within .3 miles you will come to Newton Road. Turn right on Newton Road and walk downhill for about .4 miles on packed and the loose dirt and gravel. The trail then turns into the woods to the left and begins to climb again. The climb is steep averaging 16% even with the switchbacks but it is only .3 miles to the top of the hill. The trail has been heading east but at the top of the hill it turns north and immediately begins a descent on a woods road. This is gentle at first but at 7.3 miles the trail turns east again and begins a steep descent to Route 13 at 7.7 miles. At Route 13 turn right and begin to WA south. At 9 miles pass Cold Spring Road on the left and at the top of the hill turn right on Robbins Road and begin the hike over the ridge. At 10.2 miles you will be on the section of Robbins Road that you hiked earlier. This time hike up the hill and then continue on the road instead of turning into the woods. Walk downhill for a pleasant 1.25 miles. Near the Harrisburg Hollow Road the surface is paved which makes walking easier. At the intersection on the right side of the road is a strange structure. It is very tall and thin with a door and three stained glass windows with a cross on the side. Continue the hike by turning left on Harrisburg Hollow Road and walking south. Walk the final 1.8 miles downhill and south on the road. Turn left on Sand Pit Road and walked 300 feet uphill to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Sexton Hollow Road to Switzer Hill RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.2 mi. 2270 ft. GPSIES

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Take exit 42 from Route17/I86 and turn right or northeast on Route 16 toward Monterey. After 7.6 miles, turn left on Sexton Hollow Road which turns to dirt and gravel and then back to pavement. Watched for FLT signs just after the road became paved again and changes names to Monterrey Road. Pull over on the shoulder of the road just passed the trail entrance and made sure you are off the pavement.

Walk south on the road to the trail entrance and head northeast up the hill. The first part of the trail heads northeast and climbs a hill for .6 miles gaining 275 feet with several switchbacks along the way. Continue down the other side of the hill on a woods road which heads north. Watch for a turn to the right onto a switchback at about 1 mile. The switchback crosses the woods road several times At 1.1 miles the trail turns east and then at 1.5 miles it turns south. Along the way it crosses a few small stream that may have some water. At one point the trail empties out onto a gas well access road. Turn left and walk uphill on the road briefly before turning left into the woods again. At around 2 miles the trail parallels a stream bed for some time and approaches Corbett Hollow Road. Walk down to Corbett Hollow Road at 2.1 miles and made a sharp left turn. The road isn't much of a road as it is dirt with a lot of grass which becomes more and more eroded the further you go. Watch for the turn to the right off the "road" and enter the woods to continue the hike. The Finger Lakes Trail map description indicates a bivouac site north of the turn at the turn around point on the road. The next section of trail has 12 switchbacks to make the climb up the hill easier by making the grade smaller. Walk along the trail next to a stream bed and then start the first switchback at about 2.6 miles. Over about 1.3 miles from Corbett Hollow Road to the top of the climb the trail gains 640 feet averaging a 10% grade. At the top of the climb cross a gas well access road and walk the flat summit before starting to descend the other side. Descend the east side of the hill for about .7 miles losing 400 vertical feet to a small stream bed. The stream bed is highly eroded and it is difficult to climb the opposite bank. On the other side is a set a steps and a switchback that led to Goundry Hill Road. Cross the dirt and gravel road and continue to descend through a mixed hardwood and pine forest. At 5 miles the trail comes to Switzer Hill Road at an elevation of 1390 feet. Turn left and walk a short distance north to the point where the trail reentered the woods. This is the turn around point. The hike is a true out and back so turn around and retrace your route back to your car on Sexton Hollow Road. You may appreciate the switchbacks more on the way back!

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Shears Road to MasonvilleTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.7 mi. 2370 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot as it is 6.4 miles one way. It can be done as an out and back. The route described here is the out and back! Take exit 84, the Deposit exit, on State Route 17. Drive north about 10 miles on Route 8. Watch for signs for Steam Mill State Forest and a parking area on the right. Go past the parking area and watch for an ice cream stand on the left and Hardwood Hills Golf Course on the right. Turn left on Shears Road and watch for the sign for Arctic China State Forest on the right. Park on the left side of the road just passed the sign. Walk back down the road passed the sign and turn left on a woods road to begin your hike. The trail begins on a woods road and is well marked with numerous blazes. Some sections of the Finger Lakes Trail seem to be unused and the blazes are faded and very far apart. This trail is well blazed for the entire length and seems to be used by hikers, bikers and horses. The trail stays on the woods road and heads west for just less than a mile climbing slightly all the way. At this point it turns north and continues to climb to just over a mile before descending to Beales Road. At Beales road there is a trailhead kiosk and limited parking. The trail enters an evergreen forest and winds its way through the trees until again hitting a woods road. The road climbs very gently passing a field on the left. At 3.0 miles there is a viewpoint over the field and across the valley to the west over some hills. A small bench provides a resting spot and was placed there by the TriTown Hikers. After hitting a high point, the trail begins to descend over the next mile. At 4.2 miles there is a blue spur trail to the right. The trail goes to the Getter Hill lean-to just 250 feet off the trail. The lean-to was built in 2011 and has the typical open front with a fireplace but also sports a picnic table, an outhouse and a nearby stream. After the lean-to trail is a low point as you cross a bridge over a stream and then the trail begins to climb again. The trail climbs for about .8 miles and then starts to descend, meeting another woods road. From here it is all downhill to Masonville. At 5.7 miles you will hit Getter Hill Road. Turn left to descend the dirt road which soon turns to pavement. The walk down the road is short. As you near Route 206 turn right on a grassy lane which runs parallel to the road. Once on Route 206 turn right and walk along the road for .2 miles before turning left on Church Street. Just .1 miles more and you will be at the Church Street Bridge which is your destination. The bridge was a road bridge at one time but had been closed to cars. The Finger Lakes Trail Conference donated decking which was installed by the people of Masonville to make a nice foot bridge over Masonville Creek. If you have spotted a car here your hike is over. If your car is back on Shears Road, turn around and retrace your steps! The ascents may seem a little harder on the way back.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Paradise Hill to Ridge RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 14.2 mi 2170 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 8.4 miles one way for a total of 14.2 miles. The route described here is out and back with roads use to shorten the "back" or return trip. Take the exit for Whitney Point off of I-81. Follow Route 26 north for about 21 miles northeast To Pitcher. Turn left on Route 12 and drive 8 miles through Lincklaen. Turn right on Route 12B, the Lincklaen Center Road.Drive about 2 miles and continue straight ahead on Paradise Hill Road through Lincklaen Center. Drive about 1.6 miles up the hill to just passed where Woods Road, a seasonal maintenance road heads off to the right. Park off the road on the shoulder. To begin your hike pick up the Finger Lakes Trail on the right or east side of the road. Within a few minutes you will cross Woods Road and begin ascending a Stage Coach Hill. As soon as you hit the high point you begin to descend dropping almost 600 feet to Dublin Road where you should turn right 2 miles into the hike. There is excellent parking on Dublin Road and although the surface is dirt and gravel driving it is no problem. Walk down Dublin Road for .3 miles and then turn into the woods on the left. It is only .5 miles to Mariposa Road but several switchbacks stretch this to 1 mile. Along the way you will gain over 400 feet of elevation before you cross the road. It is less than a mile from Mariposa Road to Bamberry road and the trail undulates a little along the way. At 3.5 miles you will cross a stream on a nicely built bridge. It was the only bridge across any of the streams on the hike but most of the stream are almost dry except using the wettest seasons. After crossing the bridge, head uphill on the trail. As you cross Bamberry Road the trail enters private property. In only .4 miles from the road there is a junction with the Link Trail which connects with the North Country Trail. The North Country Trail when completed will stretch from Crown Point, NY to North Dakota passing through seven states over 4600 miles! In New York the trail will follow much of the Finger Lakes Trail starting at the trail junction with the Link Trail. Just passed the Link Trail and is a sign that says "FLT to Adirondacks, Long Path, Catskills". From this point the map is relatively silent about the next two miles which is a shame since this is by far the trickiest part of the hike! Somewhere around 4.9 miles you will enter a field. The grass is often high. Look for white blazes on posts as you cross he field as there is only the hint of a trail. Head across the field and watch for white blazes on the trees on the other side. You should be turning left to follow the trail just inside the tree line. Follow these blazes through some high grass and brambles until you come to a barbed wire fence with a stile that has a white blazes. Turn left to head east along a country lane which has only a few blazes. Walk along the lane for about .2 miles as it skirts the edge of the field after which you should turn south and enter a pine forest. The next section of trail is constructed to head south while staying out of the farm fields and to do this it takes several interesting turns. A little further along the trail you will pass by the shore the of a small pond. Continue along the trail as it descends to Ratville Road 7.3 miles. There is a place to pull a car off the road here. Cross Ratville Road and hike a little over a mile to Ridge Road. The trail ascends and then descends a small hill along the way. The last part of the trail follows a nice stone wall for some distance before crossing Ridge Road at 8.4 miles where there is plenty of room to park several cars. If you have a car parked there, your hike is done. Otherwise, turn around here and head back over the hill to Ratville Road. Turn left on the dirt and gravel road and walk downhill and then slightly uphill until you get to Mariposa Road. Turn right on Mariposa Road and walk .3 miles. Turn left on Lincklaen Center Road and walk up a hill. Stay on Lincklaen Center Road for about 2.3 miles as it loses about 400 feet to the intersection with Paradise Hill Road in Lincklaen Center. Turn right on Paradise Hill Road and walk through Lincklaen Center and then start to climb Paradise Hill Road. The distance back to the car is 1.6 miles and we you will gain 460 feet.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Purvis Rd to Owego Hill RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.7 mi 1710 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 11.7 miles round trip and has some elevation gain. The route described here is a loop using roads for the return trip! Take exit 9 on I-81 and head west on Route 221 to the junction with Route 38. Turn right and drive north for 2.5 miles. Turn right on Purvis Road and park on the widest part of the shoulder on the right side of the road. Begin the hike by walking east on Purvis Road for .6 miles and then turn right on Willow Crossing. After crossing a road bridge, there is a small parking area on the left. This is part of the Jim Schug Trail which is a rail trail. The Finger Lakes Trail uses a small part of the rail trail. Turn left onto the trail which is absolutely flat and smooth and well maintained. At 1.4 miles turn right on Lake Road where the rail trail continues straight. Hike to 1.7 miles where the trail enters a field between two houses. A track is mowed between the two houses and heads due east toward a hill. The trail may be wet and muddy in spots but it is easy to follow. Just before starting into the woods, turn around for a nice view including Dryden Lake. The trail up the hill has many switchbacks which makes the path less steep but adds to the distance. Not far into the woods is a very large oak tree with an Finger Lakes Trail register on one side. Continue to the top of the hill heading generally eastward. There is a Field View Trail on the right which you may ant to investigate. At 3.25 miles there is a nice lookout on the right side of the trail which you can get to by walking through the woods to an opening. Continue to hike back on the main trail. Be aware that the land you are traveling on is private and landowners have given permission for the Finger Lakes Trail Conference to use the land. The trail can be extremely wet and muddy. The trail is not as well marked as the eastern portion and blazes are few and far between with turns not clearly marked. At 4.2 miles be careful not to miss the point where the trail turns right just before the power line right-of-way. Follow the trail through some areas which can be very wet as it descended the hill roughly paralleling the right-of-way. Eventually the trail crosses under the power line in a swampy area. Continue to follow the trail through many twists and turns and switchbacks heading east toward Daisy Hollow Road. As you approached the road, the trail descends to a stream. The trail is highly eroded and there are few no white blazes. Down by the stream there are some blazes. Cross the stream and arrive at Daisy Hollow Road. Turn left on Daisy Hollow Road and walk .6 miles up a hill. At 5.55 miles turn right off the road and enter the woods for about a 2 mile hike to Owego Hill Road. The trail continues heading east paralleling an intermittent stream. At about 6.15 miles watch for the point where the trail turns right and crosses a stream. The turn may not be marked and the turn is easy to miss! Continue to follow the trail east paralleling the stream and gaining some elevation. Followed the trail as it turns south at about 6.8 miles crossing a small stream. At 7.2 miles the trail crosses Owego Hill Road which is definitely a "seasonal maintenance only". Turn right and follow the road to 8.5 miles and turn right on Adams Road. Follow Adams Road for about 1 mile to the intersection with Daisy Hollow Road. Turn left and follow Daisy Hollow Road .9 miles to Willow Crossing. Turn right and walk .7 miles to Purvis Road passing the rail trail on the way. Turn left on Purvis Road and walk .6 miles back to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Ridge Road to Otselic SFTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 14.6 mi 2170 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 8.6 miles one way for a total of 17.2 miles. The route described here is out and back with roads used to shorten the "back" or return trip. Take the exit for Whitney Point off of I-81. Follow Route 26 north to South Otselic. Turn left on County Route 13 and then turn right on Maple St which becomes Ridge Road. After 4.25 miles on Ridge Road, you will pass Buck Brook Road and then the Finger Lakes Trail crossing about .3 miles after that.Park on the shoulder and begin your hike by entering the woods on the east side of the road. The trail almost immediately crosses a small brook and from there ascends a small hill. It drops to another stream at 1.2 miles into the hike. The trail skirts McDermott Hill on the right and begins to follow a well-defined logging road. Watch carefully since the trail veers right off the logging road at about 1.9 miles. The trail climbs a bit and then rejoins the logging road and continues to descend. Once again watch for the blazes that leave the trail to the right as the logging road starts to descend. The trail starts to ascend through the woods and then over the next .4 miles descends about 250 feet to Bucks Brook Road. Turn left at the road and walk .3 miles out to Route 26. Turn right on Route 26 and hike down the wide shoulder for .35 miles crossing the Otselic River to a fishing access on the right side. Walk through the parking area to the old road beyond. Turn left ion the road and bear slightly to the right and up a trail that parallels the river. you will have to hike up the path to find some white blaze indicating the Finger Lakes Trail. The trail follows the river but stays high on the bank for a short distance. At about 4.6 miles the trail begins a series of switchbacks to climb Truman Hill. From the river you will climb about 550 feet to the top of Truman Hill crossing a road just before the summit. After the summit the trail descends the other side of the hill to another road where the trail parallels but does not meet the road. This part of the trail can be confusing since there are so many twists and turns. At 5.6 miles turn south onto a logging road and stay on the road for about .3 miles. Turn left off the road and loop back north almost parallel to the road. Over the next 1.25 miles you will be headed north, then east, then south, then west and then south again gaining about 350 feet along the way. The trail now heads east for the next .9 miles gains and then loses elevation in the process. You will now be hiking in primarily evergreen forest. At about 8 miles you will begin another 200 foot ascent for about half a mile passing the Winston Braxton Memorial Bench along the way. You are now headed south and downhill. After passing through an old quarry you will walk through some more pines and at 9.2 miles you will be on Warner Road. If you have a car parked here, use it to return to Ridge Road. If you have only one car back at Ridge head east on Warner Road for 1.35 miles to Route 26. Along the way the road becomes paved and drops 560 feet. When you reach Route 26, turn right and head north toward the intersection with Bucks Brook Road. Route 26 has pretty good shoulders in most places but most vehicles travel quite a bit above the speed limit! You will only be on the main road for 1.8 miles. At 12 miles you will pass the fishing access area and at 12.3 miles you should turn left on Valley View Road. It is a short walk to Buck Brook Road where you turn right and head northwest along the brook. The walk up Bucks Brook Road is scenic with several small cascades that are varied and interesting, The walk up Bucks Brook Road is about 2 miles to Ridge Road and the elevation we gain is about 425 feet. At 14.3 miles at the end of Bucks Brook Road, turn right on Ridge Road and walked the final .3 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Route 79 to Purvis RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 14.8 mi 2370 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 14.8 miles round trip and has some elevation gain. The route described here is a loop using roads for the return trip! Take exit 8 on I-81 and head west on Route 79 for about 15.5 miles to Robinson Hollow Road on the right. Drive passed the road and park in the snowplow turnaround on the other side of a stream. DO NOT park here during months when there is snow or your car may be towed! Start walking east on Route 79 toward Robinson Hollow Road for .4 miles. Turn left on Robinson Hollow Road and walk about .4 miles. After crossing a road bridge, Robinson Hollow Road bends to the right. At this point the trail turns off the road to the left. Start to climb a woods road that gains 450 feet in the first .5 miles for a 15% grade. The trail may be very wet in spots especially after rain. The trail is well-marked in most spots and you won't have to stop and guess where you should go next. After climbing, the trail drops down to a stream bed and starts crossing it several times. Continue to follow the stream until 2.4 miles climbing slightly along the way until the trail crosses the stream again heading mostly north. The trail climbs heading north with a few swings to avoid steep climbs or other obstacles. At 3.7 miles the trail reaches 1950 feet and begins to descend to the Harford-Slaterville Road or Route 117. Cross the road to stay on the trail and continue north crossing another stream at about 4.8 miles. The trail begins an ascent to 2015 feet which is the highest point on this route. At the high point there is a microwave facility to the right of the trail. Begin a slight descent to Star Stanton Hill Road which at about 7.1 miles. The "road" is little more than a washed out gully. Turn right and follow the trail downhill for about a mile to Route 38. Turn right on the main road and then immediately left on Purvis Road. This is the end of map section 18. Turn around to return the way you came up the hill on the trail. At the point where the trail turns left off the "road", continue straight ahead to Canaan Road. The trail markings indicate a snowmobile trail and it is a short walk to a trail junction with clear signage. A sign points south with a label for "Caroline 6 miles" and Canaan Road. Canaan Road is an abandoned town road which is now part of the Hammond Hill State Forest. At 10.6 miles Red Man Run Road comes in from the left. Continue south on Canaan Road without turning and in another half mile the road becomes paved. At 11.7 miles pass Luddington road on the left and continue downhill to 12.2 miles. Turn right on Harford Road or Route 29 and walked west to Flat Iron Road where you should turn left at 12.8 miles. Route 79 is about a mile away but the road is so straight and flat you can see all the way to your next turn. This road is flanked by farms and on the right side by the Goetchius Wetland Preserve. This is an 80 acre preserve owned by the Finger Lakes Land Trust in Tompkins County. The wetlands drain both to the north and south. At Route 79, turn left or east and start to hike the last mile back to the car. The road has a wide shoulder which was fortunate since the traffic seems to travel somewhat above the speed limit!

(The map above shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Solon Pond Rd to Stoney Brook RDTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 12.1 mi 1835 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best as a car spot since it is 7.2 miles out and 5 miles back. The route described here is a loop that uses local back roads for the return trip. Take exit 8 off I 81 at Whitney Point and follow Routes 41 and 26 north and east to Cheningo Solon Pond Rd. Drive north on the road for about 6.5 miles to Freeman Road. Park on the side of Freeman Road near the intersection. Walk down Freeman Road following the white blazes. The road curves slightly at the bottom and you should watch as the trail turns abruptly left just before an old farmhouse that is now a hunting camp. The trail goes down into a deep ditch and then passes through a sea of waist high weeds! This area can also be wet and marshy. The weeds and marshy ground don't last long and soon the trail climbs a small hill as it enters Cuyler Hill State Forest. Over the next mile the trail climbs almost 600 feet to the top of a hill and then descended to Potter Hill Road at 1.8 miles. From Potter Hill Road climb a little more and then drop to the edge of a small stream and follow it uphill until you again cross Potter Hill Road at 2.6 miles. From Potter Hill Road to Randall Hill Road the trail rolls up and down while heading north and a little west to skirt the summit of a hill. As you approach Randall Hill Road the trail descends to an unnamed brook and a bivouac area called Wiltsey Glen. There is a fire ring and a good water source. Here the trail turns west to follow the brook briefly and heads up to Randall Hill Road at 4.25 miles. An orange trail on the left goes to the Rose Hollow Bivouac Area shortly after crossing the road. At 6.2 miles you will hit the highest point on the hike as you summit 2084 foot Randall Hill. From here it is only about .5 miles to Stoney Brook Road but a series of switchbacks lengthens that to about a mile. Arrive at Stoney Brook Road after hiking 7.2 miles. If you have a car parked here, your hiking is done. If you only have one car, turn left on Stoney Brook Road and hike the short distance out tom Cuyler Hill Road where you should turn left. At 8.4 miles pass Enzes Road on the left. As you walk down Cuyler Hill Road you will be between two low ridges. It is a pretty walk and along the way there is a nice, piped spring. At 10.3 miles Randall Hill Road comes in from the left. Turn left on Cheningo Solon Pond Road at 11.4 miles and start the last part of the hike back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: South Oxford Bridge to Basswood RdTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.8 mi 700 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done as a car spot but it is only 6.8 miles. The route described here is out and back with a little loop thrown in! Take Route 12 south from Oxford for about 4 miles. Watch for South Oxford Bridge Road on the left. Turn left on the road and drive across the bridge over the Chenango River. Park in the small pullout on the left side of the road before the railroad tracks. The white blazes of the Finger Lakes Trail lead Southbridge Road up to Route 32. Turn right on Route 32 and walk south for .7 miles. Turn left on Basswood Road.and walk slightly uphill for .4 miles. Turn right onto a private woods road and walk through a gate on the The trail description on the Finger Lakes Trail Conference maps is a little unclear from this point on but the blazes are very clear. The trail winds its way down to Bear Creek and then begins to parallel the stream. The description on the map mentions waterfalls but there are NO WATERFALLS. There are a few areas where some water drops one or at the most two feet over some rocks with some deeper pools. At about 3.4 miles the trail begins to pull away from the creek and starts uphill towards Basswood Road. This part of the trail can get very overgrown with brush and weeds. Sometimes you may have to hack through milkweed and goldenrod just to make a path. In other areas, there may only be a low "tunnel" through the bushes. Soon you will briefly enter a stand of conifers near the trail register and just before entering the field that takes you up to Basswood Road. Once you hike up to the road you may turn around and reverse your hike through the woods. You may also turn left on Basswood Road and hike back to where you turned onto the private road. It is easier walking and saves a little less than a mile. For 1.7 miles you will walk mostly downhill on the road until you are at the private woods road. From this point is was about .4 miles back to Route 32 and then 1.1 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Steam Mill SF to Mormon HollowTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.4 mi. 2600 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done as a car spot as it is 5.2 miles one way! The route described here is out and back! Take exit 84, the Deposit exit, on State Route 17. Drive north about 9 miles on Route 8. Watch for signs for Steam Mill State Forest and a parking area on the right. The Finger Lakes Trail crosses here and leaves the back right corner of the parking area. The trail follows an old logging road and begins to gain some elevation as you walk along a stone wall. The trail description from the Finger Lakes Trail Conference describes a viewpoint at the height of land but it seems to have grown in. There is a view of a logged area but nothing else. Descend the other side of the hill and drop down to Steam Mill Road. Cross the road and then walk across the brook. Next you will hike about .5 miles across some wetlands and then through some evergreens. Eventually this turns to hardwoods until you came out on Barbour Brook Road. Turn left on the road and continue to walk uphill until the trail turns off the road at the beginning of a snowmobile trail. Watch carefully here and DO NOT take the snowmobile trail bow follow the white Finger Lakes Trail blazes over the hill. You will reach a high point of land and then descend a little before climbing again to a ridge. From here the trail descends steeply for the next .6 miles losing 500 feet. At the bottom of the descent you will cross Dry Brook Road and come to a camping area next to the stream. There is a nice kingpost bridge constructed as an Eagle Scout project in 1994. From here you will begin to ascend again as you head for the Dry Brook lean-to. The wettest parts of the trail are spanned by planks held together with screening. Within .2 miles you will pass a blue blazed trail on the left which leads to a cistern for water. Continue to climb and in another .4 miles you will be at the Dry Brook lean-to. It has a fire pit and picnic tables in front. Continue to climb for another .2 miles to Rocky Point. There are several large boulders here which must be of glacial origin since they are on the highest point around. Continued over Rocky Point and then descend steeply on the trail for about .3 miles to a logging road. Turn left on the logging road and follow it and the white blazes for another .7 miles down to Route 27 near the Cannonsville Reservoir. The drop to the road is almost 800 feet! If you have parked a car near here, walk to the car. If your car is back at Steam Mill SF, turn around and hike back!

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Steve Russell Hill Rd to Hoxie GorgeTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.8 mi 1565 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 4.9 miles one way for a total of 9.8 miles and because the scenery is not that interesting. The route described here a loop using local roads for the return trip. Take Route 11 north from Marathon for 3.5 miles to Steve Russell Hill Road on the right. Turn right onto this dirt and gravel road and pass under the high bridges for I81. Where the road splits continue straight ahead passing the "seasonal Maintenance" sign. Be careful as you drive up the road as there are some deep gullies and large rocks. Once I even encountered a tree that had just fallen across the road. Find where the Finger Lakes Trail enters the woods on the left. Park in the wide spot on the left shoulder. This trail can be slippery when wet and insect repellant is a good idea. If you hike with a dog, note the sign that warns about high porcupine activity. The trail initial drops to a stream heading northwest and is well-marked in most places. At .8 miles cross a small stream on a bridge and arrive at a nice pond. After the pond he trail descends on some steps and meanders back and forth and up and down turning north at 1.2 miles. Continue to cross small streams walking up and down some hills. The traffic noise from I81 is obvious and you may be able to see the cars on the highway. Somewhere between 2 and 3 miles the blazing seems to change for the worse. Some turns were not well-marked and the blazes become harder to spot and farther apart. At 3 miles begin an ascent of 350 feet and at 3.9 miles pick up a woods road that leads to a DEC dirt road. Walk along the road and hit the high point of the hike at 1770 feet 4.2 miles into the hike. From here the road descends to the Hoxie Gorge Freetown Road at 4.8 miles. Cross the road to continue the hike to where the old trail used to come in from Hoxie Gorge Road. The trail is more of the same thing you have been hiking with several small stream crossings. Somewhere around 5.3 miles the trail joins a nice woods road and turns right to parallel a more substantial stream. As you walk along this road, notice several small cascades. You will pass a Cornell University Environmental sign as you near your destination. Arrive at an area where a stream spread across the trail and the main Finger Lakes Trail turns right while a Cornell trail goes left. The trail that goes to the left used to be the main Finger Lakes Trail before the newest reroute. At this junction there is also an old stone bridge with a large culvert underneath it. Turn around to head back to Hoxie Gorge Freetown Road. Turn left and start to hike southeast along the road. At At 8 miles turn right on Merihew Road. Turn right onto Steve Russell Hill Road at 8.8 miles to complete the loop. Walk uphill for about a quarter mile and then downhill the final .7 miles to the car>

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Stone Quarry Hill Rd to South Oxford BridgeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty> 10.6 mi. 1650 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done as a car spot as it is 5.3 miles one way! The route described here is out and back! Take Route 12 south from Oxford. In 1.8 miles turn right on Route 3 heading west. After 3 miles, watch for Stone Quarry Hill Road on the right. Turn on the road and drive a few hundred feet to a log house on the right. Park on the grass just before the house next to the FLT sign. Walk down the road to Route 3 and turn right and then immediately left on Fred Wilcox Road. The road rolls a little as it passes some houses and a farm. At 1.3 miles continue on the road as it bends to the left and turns into French Road. Walk .2 miles more to the beginning of the trail through the forest on the right which is clearly marked. The trail climbs a little over a small hill and then starts to descend. The woods were mostly hardwoods and some areas may be wet. The trail here seems used by hikers and horses alike! Over the next 1.9 miles you will drop about 500 feet in elevation eventually hitting a woods road and then skirting the edge of a field to end up at Buckley Corners. At the corners the trail is clearly visible on the other side of the road. Cross the road and you will quickly come to one of several stiles on the trail. These stiles are triangular frames with crosspieces that straddled the fences. They allow you to climb up and over the fence. In most cases the fences are in disrepair and the stiles are superfluous but they add an interesting touch. The trail now parallels Bowman Creek and you can hear, and sometimes see, the water below. For the next 1.7 miles the trail runs along the creek and, in general, descended as you head toward Route 12. In several spots you may gain a little elevation and then drop it again as the trail avoids deep drops into some small ravines. Near the end of the trail there is a sign that described a sawmill that existed on the creek in 1875. You may be able to spot the foundations down near the stream bed. Cross another stile and then walk along the edge of a field to a short trail that leads down to Route 12. Turn left and walk a few hundred feet to South Oxford Bridge Road where you should turn right. It is a short walk to the bridge over the Chenango River. Just before the river are faint remnants of the Chemung Canal in a cornfield. On the other side of the bridge ware some abandoned Conrail tracks and a small parking area. If you parked a car here you are done with your hike. If your car is at Stone Quarry Hill Road, turn around an retrace your rote. As you return along Bowman Creek there is a path that leads down to the stream but the bank is very steep. This is about 3.6 miles from the beginning of the trail or 6.7 miles on the return trip. The falls is very nice even in low water. The stream is shallow in most places but there is a deep pool. Back on the main trail walk back out to Buckley Corners. Walk back along the edge of the field and then start a long but gradual 1.5 mile climb regaining the 500 feet you lost earlier in the hike. At 8.9 miles you will hit the high point on the trail and then descend to French Road where you turn left to begin the road walk back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Stoney Brook Rd to Paradise Hill Rd (Chippewa Falls)Trails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 15.6 mi. 2330 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done as a car spot as it is 6.6 miles one way! The route described here is out and back and includes an additional 3 miles out and back to Chippewa Falls which is not part of the main Finger Lakes Trail! Take I81 north from Binghamton and get off at exit 11. Head northeast on Route 13 for 15 miles. Turn right on Lincklaen Road and drive 2 miles to Cuyler Hill Road. Turn right on Cuyler Hill Road and drive 1.5 miles to Stoney Brook Road on the left. Stoney Brook Road is dirt and gravel and is quite rough so drive carefully. Drive up the hill and passed the first parking area on the left where the forest begins. Drive a little farther to where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses and park on the shoulder of the road. To begin your hike cross the road and enter the forest. Walk to the first trail junction where an orange spur trail heads right to Chippewa Falls. Turn left to follow the Finger Lakes Trail and the Onondaga Trail back out to Stoney Brook Road at .3 miles. Turn right and walk to toward Cuyler Hill Road. At Cuyler Hill Road turn right and walk downhill for over 1.5 miles to Lincklaen Road where you should turn right. Lincklaen Road has good shoulders and a good sight lines so walking it isn't too bad. At 3.5 miles you will pass from Cortland County into Chenango County. At 3.6 miles make a left onto County Rt 12 and at 4.2 miles enter Madison County. After walking uphill slightly, look for the Finger Lakes Trail sign on the right side the of the road at 4.4 miles. Cross the road and climb a small hill on a woods road. Soon the trail turns left off the road and continues to ascend the hill through mostly hardwoods. The trail is well marked and maintained and walking is pleasant. Ahead at 5.0 miles is a stream described as "reliable" on the map. The map also mentions a bypass trail but this trail only bypasses the lean-to ahead and is really just a shortcut. The stream is nearly dry in the summer but can swell when there is heavy rain. The trail passes through evergreen trees and their needles make a nice, soft carpet for walking. At 5.2 miles you will come to the Paradise Garden Lean-to complete with fireplace and picnic table. Just before hitting a logging road at 6.1 miles, you should noticed the orange bypass trail on the left. Continue across the logging road and walk through some pines along the edge of a large field. Soon you will descend through some hardwoods to Paradise Hill Road where you can get in your second car if you have a shuttle or turn around to hike back to Stoney Brook Road. On the way back you may want to take the bypass trail which is even less used than the main Finger Lakes Trail. It is an interesting change from the main trail. It has a short but steep descent to the "reliable" stream. From the stream retrace your steps back to the road an walk back to your car at Stoney Brook Road.

At this point you are done with the main hike but you may want to visit Chippewa Falls. Be warned that the falls is all but dry in the summer and is better views in the spring or after head rains! Also be aware that the trail is not maintained and you may have to walk through high ferns and prickers and around significant blowdown. Cross Stoney Brook Road to begin the hike to the falls. Only .1 miles in you will come to the trail junction where you should continue straight ahead on the orange spur trail. The Finger Lakes Trail used to take this route until the landowner and the base of Chippewa Falls rescinded his permission to allow hiking on his land. The white blazes have been removed and replaced with the orange ones. The trail climbs a little initially but then drops over 350 feet in the last .8 miles to the falls. The trail parallels a stream for the last part of the hike and the amount of water in the stream is a clue to how much is going over the falls. When you arrive at the falls, the drop from top to bottom is truly impressive. Stay on the side you are on since the viewing is better. Do NOT descend further than the top of the falls as it is private property. Various sources list the height as being from 50 to 200 feet with the actual height being somewhere between. When you are ready, return the way you came for a total of about 3 miles.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Telephone Rd to Solon Pond RdTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 16.0 mi. 2772 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done as a car spot as it is at least 7.8 miles one way! The route described here is out and back using back roads on the "back" to add some variety Take I81 north from Binghamton and get off at exit 10. Head east on Route 41 for about 6 miles. As Route 41 curves to the south, continue straight ahead on Telephone Road and drive 1.3 miles to a large parking area on the right. Park in the lot then cross the road and turn right. A few hundred feet up the road we turn left or north and into the woods to start the hike. The trail starts to ascend right from the beginning and by the time you cross the Cortland Two Road it has gained over 200 feet. The Cortland Two is a dirt and gravel road that connects Telephone Road to Taylor Valley Road and runs almost 5 miles between them. Cross the road and begin to ascend Mount Roderick. At 1.4 miles you will pass by the summit after gaining another 200 feet. The trail is usually well maintained as you pass through Taylor Valley State Forest. After the summit of Mount Roderick the trail drops a little and skirts another hill. At 3 miles the trail meets the Cortland Two Road and begins a long descent. The map description warns that high water might make Cheningo Creek difficult to cross so you may want to stay on the Cortland Two until you get to Taylor Valley Road. The walk down Cortland Two is 1.7 miles. Along the way the trail cuts off to the right and crosses Cheningo Creek on some large stepping stones. The trail is definitely the shorter way to go. Near the end of the descent on Cortland Two Road the road turns from north to east and crosses Cheningo Creek and a very marshy area associated with it. At the Taylor Valley Road turn right and hike .8 miles on the shoulder to the Cheningo Day Use Area. As you enter the day use area head to the right side and look for a woods road-hog will have white blazes. This was the only place you might have a problem with the blazes! Followed the road for a short distance before the trail turns right and heads up Allen Hill. Over the next .6 miles you will climb through several switchbacks that turn a 20+ % grade into 12%. The trail begins to level at the top of a hill. Over the next .7 miles it continues to gain elevation to the west shoulder of Allen Hill whose highest point is on private land. Begin a descent and you will soon come to a woods road where you should turn right to continue a long descent to Solon Pond Road. Over the next .9 miles the trail loses over 500 feet! Once you arrive at the road in the vicinity of Freeman Road you can get in the car you have parked there or turn around to hike back to your car on Telephone Road. Climb to the junction of the woods road and the trail. Instead of turning left to continue on the trail, go straight ahead to meet Seacord Road and turn right. Walk 2.2 miles down Seacord Road to Taylor Valley Road dropping over 700 feet of elevation. Turn right on Taylor Valley Road and hike back to the Cortland TWO on the left. At 13.25 miles you will be in the area where the trail leaves the Cortland Two to the left. Continue straight on the road back to the car. Over the next 1.3 miles the road ascends, drops and ascends again. After the last ascent, it is all downhill for the next 1.4 miles to Telephone Road. At the road turn right and walk the .1 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Templar Road to Watkins GlenTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.4 mi. 1920 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

Drive west from Watkins Glen on Route 329 for 5.2 miles being sure to stay right on Route 329 at the intersection with Route 17. As Route 329 turns south, turn right of north on VanZandt Hollow Road. Drive 1.2 miles on VanZandt Hollow Road to the intersection with dirt Templar Road. Turn left and drive .2 miles on Templar Road where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses. Park on the side of the road. Just west of the parking is Ebenezer's Crossing and a small waterfall heavily dependent on rainstorms for its volume.

Cross the road to begin your hike by climbing up the steep bank until the trail levels off. It then descends and crosses VanZandt Hollow Road at .4 miles. The trail enters the woods on the other side for only about .1 miles and then comes back out to VanZandt Hollow Road. Turn left and walk up the hill a few steps to a Finger Lakes Trail sign. Walk off the road and immediately turn left and walk down a path looking for white blazes. This is VRY POORLY marked. DO NOT walked straight ahead off the road and onto the lane next to the farmer's fields as you will be trespassing! The trail here comes back out to a cleared area and then heads to the left back into the trees. Be careful to look sharp as the marking are not obvious. The trail follows a narrow path which may be overgrown by brush and can be poorly maintained. The trail rolls some but at one point comes very close to the edge of the gorge giving good views. Continue on the trail watching carefully for blazes. At 1.2 miles the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the boundary with Watkins Glen State Park although it may not be obvious. At 1.6 miles or so there is a steep descent to the floor of the glen. The trail crosses the stream at 1.7 miles at Julie's Crossing. During the dry seasons there may be no water present at all. After heavy rains or in the spring hikers may want to use the high water bypass marked on the Finger Lakes Trail Map 14. The crossing may not be well marked so you may have top search for the white blazes on the other side of the stream bed. At 2.6 miles watch for Hidden Valley 4H Camp to the right of the trail. Just after this get ready for a surprise. You will find stonework and a stone pathway just like those found in the main glen. A small wooden bridge crosses Hamilton Creek and this is a beautiful place to stop. Continue on the trail as it follows a woods road out to White Hollow Road at 3.1 miles. Turn right on the road and walk uphill a short distance and then turn left on an old park road. At 3.5 miles the trail leaves the road to the left and follows the rim of the gorge until you reach Punch Bowl Lake at 3.9 miles. There is a beautiful picnic pavilion here but there is no potable water, no privy and no camping! Walk passed the lake and you will find a viewpoint that allows you to get a good look at the dam. Continue on the trail to the Norfolk Southern railroad trestle at 4.9 miles. Walk a little farther if you like to make sure you overlap other hikes. The South Rim Trail continues down to Route 329 in Watkins Glen where it crosses Route 14 and follows city streets on the way to the southern end of Seneca Lake. Turn around and follow the trail back to your car. There don't seem to be any shortcuts on local roads unless you need the high water bypass.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Texas Hollow Road to Gulf RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 16.5 mi 1700 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike should be done with a car spot since it is 16.5 miles round trip and only 7.2 miles "out". The 7.2 miles out is on trails and dirt roads while the last 9.3 miles is on dirt and paved local roads which makes the walking easier. Another approach is to simply reverse the hike at the turn around point which would reduce the length to 14.4 miles. Take State Route 17/I86 to exit 64 at Owego and head north from there on Route 96 through Candor and Spencer. In Spencer pick up Route 34 west to Van Etten. Turn right onto Route 224 as Route 34 heads south. Followed Route 224 for 16.4 miles as it passes through Cayuta crossing Route 13. In Odessa turn right on Mill St and then left onto Brooklyn Terrace. At the top of the hill continue straight ahead on Texas Hollow Road and stay to the left when the road splits. Drive 5.4 miles to a gated access road that has a "Finger Lakes Trail" on the right. Park on the right shoulder of the road before the access road. Begin your hike walking down the gated access road to pick up the white blazes of the Finger Lakes Trail at the base of the road. There is a nice pond here and a wooden walkway that crosses over some very wet ground. Be careful as you cross the walkway as hikers have reported some aggressive bees in the area! Continue around the pond heading southeast and then south. Since you are in a "hollow", there will be some climbing to get out. None of the ascents are long or steep but over the first 1.4 miles the trail gains over 650 feet. The trail is easy to follow by the way it was worn in and by the blazing. The blazing is odd in places with the non-standard blaze over blaze to indicate a turn without the direction of the turn being clear. There are some turns indicated where there are none and several other turns left unmarked. At 2.1 miles cross Newton Road which is dirt and gravel. The trail starts heading east and ascends slightly before dropping to Steam Mill Road at 2.9 miles. When the trail leaves the woods on Steam mill Road, continue straight ahead on dirt and gravel Carly Road. Continued on the road as it turned right at the top of a small hill. At about 3.6 miles there is a nice view of the surrounding hills and valleys. Continue on the road as it descends a little and then passes Hosenfeldt Road on the left. At the top of the next hill turn right on Seneca Highlands which is a private road. There are signs that indicate that the area is used for motocross events and other motorsports. The road leads to a private picnic area and pond with the Rogers Hill lean-to at 4.4 miles. Continue to follow the blazes as they lead back out onto a dirt road that heads due south. This section of trail continues for about 1.7 miles turning slightly southeast near the end. The drop in elevation is gentle but at the intersection with Route 228 at 6.1 miles the elevation loss is almost 500 feet. Continue straight ahead on South Pine Road passing the Schuyler County Veterans Park on the right. It is a small park but nicely designed to honor the county's veterans. Continue down the road until at 6.2 miles where the trail turns right. For the next .9 miles head southeast along the wetlands adjacent to Cayuta Creek. The trail can be wet in spots. At Route 6, turn left and walk to Gulf Road where you will turn around at 7.2 miles. Reverse your route and Walk to Route 228. Turn left on Route 228 and follow it as it turns right at the next intersection to head toward Route 224 and Odessa. Over the next 2.25 miles hike downhill losing about 320 feet along the way. The shoulders are wide and the traffic generally light. At Route 224 turn right and hike .4 miles into Odessa turning right on Mill St and then left on Brooklyn Terrace. At the top of the hill continue straight ahead on Texas Hollow Road for 5.4 miles. The very first part of the road is a rather steep uphill followed by a short descent. After that the road climbs slightly until 15.6 miles with the last mile being a slight descent. At 12.2 miles Newton Road branches to the right and Texas Hollow road changes to dirt and gravel. Be sure to stay left on Texas Hollow Road.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Watkins Glen State Park (South Rim)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.6 mi. 782 ft. GPSIES

link to topo map

Begin your hike at the intersection of Route 329 and Route 14 or Franklin Street on the west side of Watkins Glen. There is a parking fee if you use the Watkins Glen State Park lot. The lot fills quickly especially on weekends. Public parking is available elsewhere in the village.

Walk a little less than 500 feet south on Route 329 and then turn right onto the Finger Lakes Trail as in enters the park on the South Rim Trail. The 1.3 mile trip out to the railroad trestle is all uphill but the trip back is, of course, downhill. The South Rim trail is farther away from the gorge than the other trails but still offers some nice views. At .4 miles a spur trail leaves the Finger Lakes Trail to the south to a parking area with a kiosk where the trail system is explained. At about .9 miles look to your right for some fine views of the gorge below. The views are even better when the leaves are not on the trees. You will soon see camping areas on your left. Just after the camping areas is the railroad trestle for the Norfolk Southern Railway. Walk under it and just a little farther and the turn around and walk back to where you started. You may want to walk some of the gorge trails on the way back since this is such a short hike. Not many people hike the South Rim Trail but the rails in the gorge are very popular. Choosing a weekday in the off-season give you the best chance of a little solitude in the gorge.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: Watkins Glen to BurdettTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.1 mi 1075 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike can be done with a car spot since it is 9.1 miles round trip but can easily be done without one since much of the hike is on local roads. Drive north on State Route 17 to exit 52B at Horseheads. From there it is 16.5 miles north on Route 14 to the entrance to Watkins Glen State Park. Find a place to park near the park entrance but be sure to ask permission if you want to use the parking lot for a local business. From the park entrance walk one block north on Route 14 to 10th Street. Turned right and walked one block to North Decatur Street.Make a left and walk six blocks north to Route 414 and turn right. Walk the remaining .6 miles to Clute Park on the southern shore of Seneca Lake. Walk down toward the shore watching for white blazes on the trees. Follow them east as they lead back out to Route 414. Cross Seneca Lake Inlet on a road bridge and then continue to follow Route 414 as it turns north and starts to climb away from the lake. Look for the blazes that indicate a turn to the right as the trail passes through Excelsior Glen. The blazes may be absent so at about 1.75 miles watch for a stream that cuts through the rock on the right side of the road. Cross the road and to find the trail blazes and a register. The Finger Lakes Trail almost immediately turns right and starts to climb. There are also numerous other trails that appear to enter the glen following the stream. The trail begins to climb steeply and soon passes by the base of some short cliffs. The layers of rock are interesting. Continue to climb and at about 2.3 miles the trail starts to turn north and gets closer to the creek. There are several small cascades which were really nice. Soon the trail descends to the streambed above one of the falls. The descent is a little steep and can be slippery. You will have to walk across the streambed here which is why this route comes with a warning to avoid it when there are high water conditions! The trail continues heading north out of the glen and through some thick vegetation in places. At 2.8 miles the rail meets Jolly Road where the blazes indicate a turn but do not indicate the direction. Turn left and start heading northwest on Jolly Road and descend 190 feet before crossing Route 79. After crossing the road, pick up a short section of trail that descends to Middle Road. Middle Road is a dirt road that is situated between Route 414 and Route 79. It leads to Factory Street in Burdett and has very little traffic. It has some excellent views of Seneca Lake along its length. At 4.6 miles Middle Road turns east and starts to parallel Hector Falls Creek. You may hear the water in the creek below and catch some glimpses of falls and cascades. Eventually Middle Road becomes Factory Street as you enter Burdett. At 5.2 miles turn left onto Mill Street and watch for the falls on the creek. Walk to the end of Mill Street and cross Route 79 to the firehouse and village hall. This is the turn around point of the hike. Turn right on Route 79 heading south using the sidewalks in Burdett and then the wide shoulder of the road. The walk starts out slightly uphill and then becomes flat. At 6.2 miles begin a 1.25 mile descent dropping 530 feet to the area near the lake. Follow the trail back into the park and the back out onto Route 414. Reverse your route from earlier in the day through the streets back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Finger Lakes Trail: West River Rd to Steve Russell Hill RdTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.6 mi 740 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The Finger Lakes Trail is a primitive footpath that starts in Allegheny State Park on the New York - Pennsylvania border and extends 576.5 miles to end in the Catskill Park at the beginning of the Table Peekamoose Trail off the Phoenicia East Branch Trail near the Denning trailhead. There are other side trails which increase the length of the trail system. Four hundred miles of this trail is also part of the Scenic North Country Trail. The Finer Lakes Trail Conference celebrated its 50th Anniversary on June 2, 2012. To commemorate the occasion the Conference set up a series of hikes that would cover the entire length of the trail. Hikes varied in length and difficulty from 4 to 14 miles. The Trail Conference continues to improve the trails and to move sections from roads to trails.

This hike is best done with a car spot since it is 5.8 miles one way for a total of 11.6 miles and because the scenery is not that interesting. The route described here is strict out and back without any variations. Take Route 11 north from Marathon for a little more than 7 miles toward Cortland. Watch for Route 392 on the left. Turn left on 392 and then make the next right onto West River Road. The road is dirt and gravel with some large potholes. Drive 3.8 miles until you see where the Finger Lakes Trail crosses the road. Park on the right side just passed the guard rails. Hike south on West River Road for 3.9 miles. The road does not get much traffic and parallels the railroad tracks and Tioughnionda River for the entire distance. Turn left on Route 392 and walk east crossing the river on the road bride. At Route 11 turn right or south and hike along the wide shoulder of the road. Be careful as the traffic here is heavy and fast moving. Just after .6 miles, watch for Steve Russell Hill Rd on the left.Tturn left on the dirt and gravel road and begin a mostly gentle ascent that lasts until you turn around at 5.8 miles. At 4.9 miles pass under the high bridges of I81. Just after these bridges the road splits with the better road turning to the right. Continue straight ahead for another .8 miles to the point where the Finger Lakes Trail enters the forest on the left. Turn around and retrace your route if you do not have a car parked at this end.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Fort Lee to New York BorderTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 13.5 mi. 1265 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

This hike is 13.5 miles ONE WAY. Unless you feel you can cover 27 miles, you will need to arrange a car spot or a ride.Take exit 11, Nyack, off the NYS Thruway. After getting off the exit turn left on Route 59 and then right on Route 9W not far down the road. Head south on Route 9W passing through Palisades and turning left onto Ludlow Lane at the state border. Park on the shoulder of Route 9W just north of the bus stop as far off into the grass as possible. Call a car service for a ride to Fort Lee or drive another car to Fort Lee Historical Park to start the hike. The easiest route is to get on the Palisades Parkway just south of where you are parked. Get off at exit one and take Route 505 south. The entrance to Fort Lee Historical Park is on the left after you pass under I95. The first part of the trail goes out to Route 505 where it heads north and passes under I95. Right after this it goes up a set of stairs on the right and then crosses another road on a pedestrian bridge. From here the Long Path passes through a wooded strip of land that is for the most part sandwiched between the Palisades Parkway on the west and the escarpment and Hudson River on the east. At about .5 miles there is a side trail that goes out to a viewpoint which is the first of many you will encounter. The George Washington Bridge and the city skyline are prominent from this lookout. Walk a little farther and there is another lookout. At the base of the cliff there is what looks like a park and the views of the Palisades cliffs are impressive. This general pattern repeats itself many times throughout the hike. At .8 miles blue and white trail blazes mark the Carpenter's Trail to the right that leads to the Shore Trail. At about 1.6 miles there is an iron fence ahead of us and the Long Path blazes turn to the left around Allison Park. Walk passed the entrance to the park, along the access road and then on a narrow strip of land near the parkway. Walk in front of St. Peter's College at about 2.1 miles. After passing the college, there is another viewpoint. At 2.5 miles descend some steps to East Palisades Avenue, turned right and then almost immediately left to cross the road. The aqua blazes go up some steps and then onto the trail along the edge of the cliffs. There are again nice views to the east side of the Hudson. At about 3.1 miles the Long Path turns left but there is a nice viewpoint straight ahead. Walked on an unmarked trail to the top of High Tom for some great views. Continue on the Long Path to some more great views at about 3.5 miles at the Rockefeller Lookout. At 4.6 mils there is another lookout at Clinton Point opposite East Clinton Avenue. After another viewpoint, there is a chain link fence a fence at 5.1 miles. Walk along the fence until you cross a stream and a road at 5.4 miles. There is a gate in the fence which surrounds Greenbrook Santuary which is a private sanctuary that preserves areas of forest and habitats that were once common in the area. Continue on the Long Path dipping twice to cross streams. At 6.25 miles a red trail, the Huyler's Landing Trail leaves the Long Path to the right and heads down to the Shore Path. Continue straight ahead on the Long Path which again runs along the cliffs. At about 6.75 miles reach the Alpine Lookout which has several different viewpoints. The largest one is near the top of a short hill with views up and down the river. Continue along a stone wall and then enter the woods again. The trail is on an old paved surface again and passes by several stone walls and some foundations. Continue walking along the trail with the parkway on the left and glimpses of the cliffs and river on the right. At 8.35 miles descend a hill to the Alpine Access Road bordered by a stone wall. The trail turns right and passed through a tunnel under the road. On the other side the trail begins to ascend a very rocky trail as it heads toward the headquarters for the New Jersey section of the Palisades Interstate Park. The trail continues at the far end of the parking area and passes through hardwood and evergreen forests. At 9.3 miles there is a path to the right which has a short bridge out to a rock outcrop. Walk across the bridge and out onto the rocks for some more nice views of the river. Over the next mile or so the trail follows some dirt and gravel roads while other paths cross the trail. Watch the aqua blazes carefully and you will have no trouble staying on the Long Path. At 10.7 miles there is a clearing with a small "castle". This is a monument to the New Jersey Federation of Women's Clubs which played a big part in preserving lands on the Palisades. The monument also has another good lookout. Climb the stairs to the top of the monument if you like although there are no better views from the top. Continue on the Long Path by descending some stone steps. Pass a blue and white trail, the Forest View Trail which descends to the Shore Trail. At 11.2 miles cross the access road to the State Line Lookout. There are many ski trails in the area but the aqua blazes are always very prominent. Continue to follow the blazes until at 11.7 miles and you will be behind the State Line Lookout snack bar. The trail turns left here but walk out to this very large viewpoint. Walk back to the trail and follow it as it winds its way back to the old access road. Walk along the road until the trail turns to the right into the woods again. At 12.4 miles there is a chain link fence that marks the state border. The Long Path turns right here and begins to descend a set of stone steps which are steep at times. Turn left and pass through a gate into New York continuing to descend on the steps. At 12.8 miles the descent ends and you cross a small stream on a bridge. A white trail to the right leads down to the Peanut Leap Cascade and the remnants of Lawrence Gardens. Continue on the trail which can be wet at times in these lower spots. The trail heads up a hill and soon meets Ludlow Lane. Walk back to your car on Route 9W.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back loop hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Beech Mt BSA Camp (Flynn and Big Rock Trail)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.2 mi. 980 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short or long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Cross the road and start out on the Flynn Trail as it passes trough the woods to avoid the private property around the cabin. At the end of the trail turn right on the woods road that is the Flynn Trail. Walk up the trail for 1.7 miles gaining 650 feet along the way. At 1.1 miles you may want to walk off the trail to the right to an open area that covers several acres. The area has a thin layer of dirt over bedrock but there is no indication of how it formed. There is a woods road that runs from the Flynn Trail which was once Beech Mountain Road to the south ends of this area. Some people have suggested that dirt and gravel was taken from this area when the road was built. Return to the main Flynn Trail and turn right to continue on the trail. At 1.7 miles you will be at a four-way trail junction with the snowmobile trail from Mongaup Pond on the right and the Big Rock Trail on the left. Continue straight ahead on the Flynn Trail heading toward Hodge Pond. At the next trail junction stay right to walk on the woods road heading toward the site of the old Beech Mountain Boy Scout Camp. In about half a mile pass the left turn down to Hodge Pond. Stay on the road to a Y where and stay left to get to the camp site. Walk off the road to the left to inspect some of the remaining buildings. Walk back out to the road, turn right and walk to the road down to Hodge Pond. Turn right to walk downhill toward the water and turn left on the road around the pond. Walk down to the open area at the outlet end of the pond. Turn around and walk south into the woods on the Flynn Trail heading up the hill. At the next trail junction bear right and walk the Flynn Trail to the trail junction with the Big Rock Trail. Turn right to head down the Big Rock Trail to Times Square. The walk downhill is 1.1 miles and drops 600 feet to Times Square. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail around the north and west side of Frick Pond. Continue on the trail passing over the two small bridges that carry the trail over the inlet streams. Pass under some evergreen trees and cross the long wooden walkways. Follow the Big Rock Trail to the junction with the Quick Lake Trail and turn left. Walk over the bridge at the outlet of Frick Pond. Walk up the hill to Gravestone Junction and continue straight ahead on the Quick Lake Trail. Pass the trail register and continue on the woods road back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond (Counterclockwise)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 2.2 mi. 200 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn right to get on the Loggers Loop Trail. The trail makes a slight ascent as it heads north toward Times Square. In a little over a mile you will be at Times Square, the junction of the Logger's Loop, Big Rock Trail and the trail around the back of Frick Pond. Turn left and follow the trail around the back of Frick Pond. You will cross two small bridges over streams that feed the wetlands on the north side of the pond. The trail passes through a grove of evergreen trees. To cross another stream and stay above the wetlands the trail passes over a boardwalk before coming to the junction with the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail. Continue straight ahead and cross two small bridges on the way to the outlet of Frick Pond. Cross the outlet bridge and walk up the hill to the right. Within a short distance you will be back at the junction with the Loggers Loop. Continue straight ahead and back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond (Clockwise)Trails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 2.2 mi. 200 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the right and walk around the "back" of the pond on an unnamed trail. You will cross over several wooden "bridges" or "causeways" over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. After another .5 miles of walking you will be at Times Square, a four way trail junction. Turn right on the yellow Loggers Loop Trail and continue to circle Frick Pond. At 1.75 miles you will have completed the loop. Turn left and follow the red Quick Lake Trail back to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Back Trail and Logger's Loop ClockwiseTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 3.9 mi. 400 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the left to stay on the red Quick Lake Trail start to walk slightly uphill toward Iron Wheel Junction. You will walk through a "spruce tunnel" and cross a small stream. At 1.5 miles you will be at Iron Wheel junction. Turn right on the yellow blazed Logger's Loop and head towards Times Square, a four way trail junction. The trail has a very gentle uphill and begins to swing to the east to start the loop back. At 1.85 miles you will reach the northern apex of the loop and start east and south. The trail now is mostly downhill with a few "bumps". At 2.7 miles you will arrive at Times Square where you should turn right on the yellow Blazed Big Rock Trail and walk around the "back" of the pond. You will cross over several wooden "bridges" or "causeways" over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. Turn left at the next trail junction on the Quick Lake Trail and follow your path from earlier along the Quick Lake Trail back to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Back Trail and Logger's Loop CounterclockwiseTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 3.9 mi. 400 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the right and walk around the "back" of the pond on the yellow blazed Big Rock Trail. You will cross over several wooden "bridges" or "causeways" over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. After another .5 miles of walking you will be at Times Square, a four way trail junction. Turn left on the yellow Loggers Loop Trail and walk up a hill continuing on the Logger's Loop. At 2.4 miles you will be at Iron Wheel Junction. Turn left on the red blazed Quick Lake Trail to head back toward Frick Pond. At 3.2 miles you will have looped back to the trail around the back of Frick Pond. Continue straight ahead and cross the bridge over the Frick Pond outlet. Follow The Quick Lake trail back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Quick Lake, Big Rock and Flynn TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.0 mi. 775 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the right and walk around the "back" of the pond on an unnamed trail. You will cross over several wooden "bridges" or "causeways" over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. After another .5 miles of walking you will be at Times Square, a four way trail junction. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail. This is the most challenging part of the hike at the trail gains about 650 feet of elevation over the next 1.1 miles. At the highest point on the Big Rock Trail there is a trail junction with the Flynn Trail. Turning left will take you to Hodge Pond. Turn right to go down the Flynn Trail and back to your car. The walk is about 1.7 miles but it is all down hill. When you approach the gate at the bottom of the trail, continue to follow the trail to the left into the woods. The cabin straight ahead is private property and may be occupied.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Flynn, Big Rock and Quick Lake TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.0 mi. 747 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Walk across the road to pick up the Flynn Trail. The cabin straight ahead on the road is private property and may be occupied. The hike up the Flynn Trail is 1.7 miles that is all uphill. The elevation gain to the junction with the Big Rock Trail is around 600 feet so the grade is not too great. Turn left at the top of the Flynn Trail and head down the Big Rock Trail to the four-way trail junction called Times Square. The distance is right around 1.1 miles with a drop of around 580 feet. There are two options here to return to the parking area. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail around the "back" of Frick Pond. This trail has several wooden bridges and walkways that can be slick when wet. From Times Square to the bridge at the outlet of Frick Pond is about .6 miles and almost flat. From the bridge walk up the hill to the right and along a trail that opens to a woods road. The other option is to turn left at Times Square on the Logger's Log and walk .miles back to the Quick Lake Trail at Gravestone Junction. Turn left here to walk the woods road back to the trail register. At the trail register turn right to stay on the trail and arrive back at the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in an anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Logger's Loop ClockwiseTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.7 mi. 408 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail which leaves the back of the larger parking lot. At the first junction turn left onto a woods road at the trail register. Continue about .4 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Stay to the left here to go to Frick Pond which is just .1 miles away. Follow the Quick Lake Trail over the bridge and bear left at the next trail junction to stay of red Quick Lake Trail. At about 1.5 miles you will be at Iron Wheel Junction which is marked by a set of ... iron wheels. The Quick Lake Trail turns left here and heads toward Hodge Pond. Turn right on the yellow Logger's Loop Trail. The trail ascends slightly and then begins a descent to Times Square at 2.75 miles. The name indicates that many trails cross at this point. Continue straight ahead on the Logger's Loop Trail which will bring you back to the trail junction near Frick Pond at 3.3 miles. Walk back out the way you came on the red Quick Lake Trail which will bring you back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This image suggests some rugged and steep ascents and descents but the trail is really rather FLAT.)


Frick Pond: Logger's Loop CounterclockwiseTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.7 mi. 408 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail which leaves the back of the larger parking area. At the first junction turn left onto a woods road at the trail register. Continue about .4 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn right here and walk to Times Square, a junction of several trails, at 1 mile. Continue straight across the intersection to stay on the yellow Logger's Loop heading northwest. The trail will head uphill slightly and begin to loop around until you are walking south toward Iron Wheel Junction. Arrive at Iron Wheel Junction at 2.2 miles and turn left on the red Quick Lake Trail to head back toward Frick Pond. At 3 miles you will be at another trail junction. Turn right to head toward the outlet of Frick Pond. Cross the bridge and walk to the right up the small hill. At the next trail junction continue straight ahead to the trail register. Turn right and walk back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This image suggests some rugged and steep ascents and descents but the trail is really rather FLAT.)


Frick Pond: Flynn, Big Rock and Logger's Loop TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.9 mi. 720 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Cross the road and start up the blue Flynn Trail which rises continuously but gently to a junction with the Big Rock Trail at 1.7 miles. The overall elevation gain is about 600 feet but the grade is less than 7%. At the junction turn left on the red Big Rock Trail which is also a snowmobile trail and walk just over a mile down to Times Square, a trail junction with trails in four different directions. When you reach the bottom, you will have dropped most of the elevation you gained on the Flynn Trail. Turn left on the yellow Logger's Loop which ascends slightly and then descends over a little more than half a mile to Gravestone Junction. Turn right and walk .1 miles down the hill to the Frick Pond outlet. The view from the ridge across the outlet is very pretty. The mountain to the right is Flynn's Point the high point in Sullivan County. Turn around an walk a little over half a mile on the red Quick Lake Trail to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Loggers Loop, Big Rock and Flynn TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.9 mi. 720 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail at the back of the larger parking area and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn right onto the Loggers Loop and start to walk to Times Square. The first part of this trail is slightly uphill but then descends to a four-way trail junction called, Times Square. The area around Times Square can be wet but there is usually a way to avoid the worst area. Turn right and start up the yellow blazed Big Rock Trail which is well-drained with few wet or muddy areas. The distance from Times Square to the Flynn Trail is 1.1 miles and gains just under 600 feet in elevation. The average grade is less than 10% but seems steep in comparison to the flatter trails in the area. At the top of the hill is the Flynn Trail. Turn right to head back to the car on the Flynn Trail. which is downhill for 1.7 miles to the parking area. At the gate, turn left to finish the hike on the Flynn Trail and avoid the private property around the cabin.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Flynn, Big Rock, Quick Lake and Logger's Loop TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.6 mi. 908 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Cross the road and start up the blue Flynn Trail which rises continuously but gently to a junction with the Big Rock Trail at 1.7 miles. The overall elevation gain is about 600 feet but the grade is less than 7%. At the junction turn left on the red Big Rock Trail which I also a snowmobile trail and walk just over a mile down to Times Square, a trail junction with trails in four different directions. When you reach the bottom, you will have dropped most of the elevation you gained on the Flynn Trail. Turn right on the yellow Logger's Loop which ascends about 200 feet to 3.7 miles into the hike. From here walk downhill to Iron Wheel Junction at 4.1 miles and turn left on the Quick Lake trail. This trail will take you to the bridge across the outlet of Frick Pond at 5.0 miles. This is a good spot to stop and take some pictures of this pretty pond. The mountain to the right is Flynn's Point the high point in Sullivan County. Continue on the red Quick Lake Trail back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Quick Lake, Loggers Loop, Big Rock and Flynn TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.6 mi. 908 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the right and walk around the "back" of the pond on an unnamed trail. You will cross over several wooden "bridges" or "causeways" over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. After another .5 miles of walking you will be at Times Square, a four way trail junction. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail. This is the most challenging part of the hike at the trail gains about 650 feet of elevation over the next 1.1 miles. At the highest point on the Big Rock Trail there is a trail junction with the Flynn Trail. Turning left will take you to Hodge Pond. Turn right to go down the Flynn Trail and back to your car. The walk is about 1.7 miles but it is all down hill. When you approach the gate at the bottom of the trail, continue to follow the trail to the left into the woods. The cabin straight ahead is private property and may be occupied.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Pond: Big Rock and Quick Lake TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.3 mi. 1130 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the Quick Lake Trail which leaves the back right corner of the larger parking area. Follow this out to the register box where you should turn left to continue on the Quick Lake Trail. At the first trail junction bear left and walk down to the bridge across the outlet from Frick Pond. Continue on around the pond and bear right at the next junction so that you wrap around the "back" of Frick Pond. Continue on this trail to Times Square, a junction with trails in all 4 cardinal directions. Walk straight ahead and start UP the Big Rock Trail which gains 600 feet in a little over a mile and meets the Flynn Trail. Turn left on the Flynn Trail and follow it .7 miles down to Hodge Pond. There is a woods rod that branches to the right along the way but you should avoid this. From Ridge Pond you may choose to walk around the pond to the left or right. Watch for the Flynn Trail as it branches off from the northwest corner of the pond. Follow the Flynn Trail for about .5 miles to Junkyard Junction where you should turn right to get on the Quick Lake Trail which will take you back to the parking area. In 1.4 miles a snowmobile trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another .2 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. The Logger's Loop is straight ahead but you should turn right to follow the Quick Lake trail back to the outlet of Frick Pond in about 1 mile. From Frick Pond follow the Quick Lake trail .5 miles back to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in an anticlockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Big LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.5 mi. 1260 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. Cross the bridge over the Frick Pond outlet and continue around the pond. At the next trail unction bear left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail to Iron Wheel Junction. After 1.5 miles, turn left at Iron Wheel junction to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. The Logger's Loop heads to the right here. At the next junction bear left off the Quick Lake Trail and onto a snowmobile trail. This trail at first heads west and crests a hill at 2.2 miles. After this the trail begins to drop and turns to head almost due north. Continue to follow the main snowmobile trail and ignore the many side trails and paths. At about 3.9 miles the snowmobile trail intersects the Quick Lake Trail at Coyote Junction. Turn right and follow the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail for 1.1 miles to Junkyard Junction where the Flynn Trail begins. Continue straight ahead on the Flynn Trail passing a gate and walking almost to the shore of Hodge Pond.When you reach the trail around the pond, turn left and follow the jeep trail around the back of the pinto the outlet. Continue straight ahead to pick up the Flynn Trail and walk up the hill passing a woods road on the left. Walk passed another gate and at 6.9 miles reach a four-way intersection with a snowmobile trail on the left and the Big Rock Trail on the right. Continue straight ahead staying on the Flynn Trail to the parking area. From the junction the distance is 1.7 miles and it is almost all downhill. Near the end of the hike turn left at the last gate to avoid walking passed the cabin on private property.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Flynn and Quick Lake TrailTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.4 mi. 920 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. Some are hiking trails while others are snowmobile trails or woods roads. There are numerous possibilities for short or long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery with two small ponds.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in one of the parking lots on the left. Cross the road to find the blue blazed Flynn Trail which heads up the hill through the woods to avoid the cabin which is private property. Walk 1.7 miles uphill to the junction with the Big Rock Trail on the left and the snowmobile trail from Mongaup Pond on the right. Continue straight ahead on the Flynn Trail. At 2 miles there is another trail junction with a woods road going off to the right. Stay to the left and follow the Flynn Trail down to the shores of Hodge Pond. The trail turns left just before you get to the pond but you will probably want to walk straight ahead and investigate the pond. Follow the Flynn Trail across the outlet stream of the pond. At 2.8 miles bear to the left to continue to follow the Flynn Trail. Going straight ahead will take you around the back of the pond on an old jeep road. Walk up the hill to a gate and bear to the left following the Flynn Trail. At 3.3 miles you will be at Junkyard Junction where the Flynn Trail ends at the red blazed Quick Lake Trail. Turn left on the Quick Lake Trail and walk mostly downhill for 1.6 miles to Iron Wheel Junction at 4.9 miles. The yellow blazed Logger's Loop continues straight ahead. Turn right to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. Walk another .8 miles to 5.75 miles and another trail junction. To the left a trail goes around the back of Frick Pond and ends up at Times Square, a four-way trail junction. Continue straight ahead following the Quick Lake Trail to the bridge across the outlet of Frick Pond. As you stand on the bridge the mountain in the background to the right is Beech Mountain, the highest point in Sullivan County at 3118 feet. Continue on the trail climbing a small hill and passing the Logger's Loop on the left. Continue another .4 miles back to the car. When you pass the trail register, be sure to turn right and follow the Quick Lake Trail back to the parking area. The woods road that continues straight ahead leads to private property.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a anticlockwise direction.)

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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Quick Lake and Flynn TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.4 mi. 920 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. Some are hiking trails while others are snowmobile trails or woods roads. There are numerous possibilities for short or long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery with two small ponds.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. Walk down the hill to Frick Pond and across the bridge. At the next trail junction at .7 miles bear left on the Quick Lake Trail toward Iron Wheel Junction. At 1.5 miles turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. This is Iron Wheel Junction and the yellow blazed Loggers Loop turns right. Continue to walk uphill on the Quick Lake Trail to Junkyard Junction at 3.1 miles. Turn right here to get on the blue blazed Flynn Trail. Walk another .5 miles passing through a gate and down to a trail that circles Hodge Pond. Turning left here will take you around the back of the pond on an old jeep trail. Turn right to stay on the Flynn trail and walk to 3.9 miles crossing the outlet of Hodge Pond. Turn to the right and walk uphill on the Flynn Trail passing another woods road that goes off to the left at 4.4 miles. Continue to walk to 4.7 miles where there is a four-way intersection with a snowmobile trail on the left and the Big Rock Trail on the right. Continue straight ahead on the Flynn Trail. Walk another 1.7 miles back to your car. Near the end of the woods road that makes up much of the Flynn Trail there is a gate. Turn left at the gate to stay on the trail and avoid the cabin which is private property.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Loggers Loop and Flynn TrailTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.9 mi. 860 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. From the larger parking lot find the Quick Lake Trail to walk out toward Hodge Pond. At the first junction bear left to Frick Pond and cross over the bridge at the outlet to the pond. At the next junction the Quick Lake Trail bears left. Bear right around the back of the pond. You will encounter some wooden walkways that can be very slippery even when there is no ice. The next junction is Times Square at about 1.0 mile into the hike. Turn left on the yellow Logger's Loop Trail to begin an a gentle ascent over the next 1.2 miles. At 2.25 miles you will be at Iron Wheel Junction where you will continue straight ahead on the red Quick Lake Trail. Over the next 1.5 miles you will gain about 435 feet in elevation to Junkyard Junction at the 3.7 mile mark. None of the climbing is very steep but it is continuous. At Junkyard Junction turn right on the blue Flynn Trail which is mostly flat with a descent ear the end. At the yellow gate bear to the right in the Flynn Trail and walk down to near the shore of Hodge Pond. Turn right and follow the Flynn Trail to the outlet end of Hodge Pond at about 4.5 miles. You may turn left and go around the back of the pond which has some nice views and adds only a little mileage to the hike. From the outlet continue on the Flynn Trail as it climbs to the highest point on the hike at the Big Rock Junction at the 5.2 mile mark. Continue straight ahead on the Flynn Trail which goes back DOWN to the parking area. Near the end of the trail just before the iron gate turn left into the woods and stay on the Flynn Trail. This avoids a small cabin which is usually occupied.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Flynn Trail and Loggers LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.0 mi. 915 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Walk across the road to find the blue Flynn Trail. This trail begins to gain elevation immediately until you reach the Big Rock Trail junction at 1.7 miles. Continue straight ahead and then bear left at the next intersection to head down to Hodge Pond at 2.3 miles. Walk to the right of the pond and up a hill on an unmarked jeep trail. Continue around the back of the lake and watch for the blue markings of the Flynn Train appear on your right at about 2.85 miles.Turn right on the Flynn Trail and walk to Junkyard Junction at 3.4 miles. Turn left on the red Quick Lake Trail which begins a long descent to Iron Wheel Junction at 4.8 miles. Continue your hike by walking straight ahead on the yellow Logger's Loop which descends to Times Square at 6.0 miles. Turn right to walk around the back of Frick Pond over a series of wooden walkways. The walkways pass over some very wet areas and are a great help but they can be VERY slippery. At the end of this short trail you will be back on the red Quick Lake trail and should turn left to the out let of Frick Pond at 6.6 Miles. From the bridge over the outlet turn right up the hill to follow the Quick Lake Trail back to your car. Just after the trail register be sure to turn right as the way straight ahead may take you to a private cabin.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Quick Lake and Flynn Trails (back)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.7 mi. 1000 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. After .25 miles the Big Rock Trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake trail for another .85 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. Logger's Loop is to the right. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another 1.6 miles to Junkyard Junction. Now turn right onto the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. As you approach Hodge Pond, you may turn left and walk around the back of the pond to walk to the outlet in .6 miles Take some time to look at all the little "wonders of nature" the pond has to offer. Face the pond at the outlet and turn 180 degrees to continue on the Flynn Trail. Walk .7 miles and the Big Rock Trail will come in on your right. Continue on the Flynn Trail for 1.7 miles until you are back at the Frick Pond Parking Area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Quick Lake and Flynn Trails (front)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.1 mi. 879 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. After .25 miles the Big Rock Trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake trail for another .85 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. Logger's Loop is to the right. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another 1.6 miles to Junkyard Junction. Now turn right onto the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. As you approach Hodge Pond, turn right and you will be at the outlet after .4 miles. Take some time to look at all the little "wonders of nature" the pond has to offer. Face the pond at the outlet and turn 180 degrees to continue on the Flynn Trail. Walk .7 miles and the Big Rock Trail will come in on your right. Continue on the Flynn Trail for 1.7 miles until you are back at the Frick Pond Parking Area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Quick Lake and Flynn Trails (jeep trail)Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.4 mi. 925 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. After .25 miles a trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake trail for another .85 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. The Logger's Loop is to the right. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another 1.6 miles to Junkyard Junction. Now turn right onto the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. As you approach Hodge Pond, turn left to walk around the back of the pond on an old jeep road. On the other side of the road at about 4 miles turn left and walk up the hill. At the next junction turn right and follow the woods road back out to the Flynn Trail. At 4.4 miles turn left on the Flynn Trail. By 4.7 miles you will be at the junction with the Big Rock Trail on the right and a snowmobile trail on the left. Continue on the Flynn Trail for 1.7 miles until you are back at the Frick Pond Parking Area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Mongaup PondTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.6 mi. 1150 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. If you turn left here, Frick pond is just .1 miles. Turn right on Logger's Loop and follow it for .55 miles to Times Square. The name indicates that many trails cross at this point. Turn right here onto the yellow-blazed Big Rock Trail. Continue on this trail for 1.1 miles until it crosses the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. Several areas on Big Rock have significant but not severe climbs. Turn left on the Flynn Trail and hike .45 miles to Hodge Pond. From here retrace the last .45 miles on the Flynn Trail until the intersection with Big Rock Trail. Turn left onto the snowmobile trail and get ready for a short climb. This trail meanders for about 2.3 miles until it intersects the paved Loop Road at the Mongaup Pond State Campsite. Turn right on the loop road and walk about .75 miles to the gatehouse. Walk out the access road for about 1.1 miles and make a right on Beech Mountain Road. After .3 miles, you will be back at the Frick Pond Parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Mongaup PondTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.0 mi. 1100 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left here and walk to Frick Pond which is just .1 miles away. Cross the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. At the next trail junction bear right to go around the pond on the yellow-blazed trail. Walk to the next trail junction which is called Times Square as several trails cross here. You will be about 1.2 miles into the hike. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail and get ready for an ascent to the Flynn Trail. Over the next the next 1.1 miles you will gain 580 feet to the junction with the Flynn Trail. Continue straight ahead on the snowmobile trail and gain another 150 to the top of the hill and a long descent. The trail now heads south then east and then north before turning southeast and then south until it meets the loop road at Mongaup Pond. When you reach the loop road you will be at 4.6 miles and will have lost 735 feet from the top of the hill. Turn right ion the loop road and head toward the entrance to the campgrounds about a mile away. Walk out the road for 1.1 miles to the intersection with Beech Mountain Road. Turn right and head up a small hill and back to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Mongaup Ponds: Quick Lake and Big Rock TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.5 mi. 1260 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. Turn left here and go to the bridge at the outlet Frick Pond. Cross the bridge and bear to the left at the trail junction to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. Continue on the Quick Lake trail to Iron Wheel Junction at 1.5 miles into the hike. Turn to the right to get on the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop Trail. The trail rolls some with a descent near the end. After 1.2 miles, you will be at Times Square. Turn left here at start up the Big Rock Trail which ascends 600 feet in 1.1 miles until it meets the Flynn Trail. Continue straight ahead on the snowmobile trail and continue your ascent to the highest point on the hike at about 2850 feet. The snowmobile trail now descends to the shore on Mongaup Pond. The distance "as the crow flies" is less than a mile but the trail is routed to avoid ledges that a snowmobile could not negotiate. Over 1.9 miles the trail drops about 700 feet. Turn right on the loop road and walk a mile to the gatehouse. Walk 1.1 miles to the junction with Beech Mountain road. Turn right and walk .25 miles back to the car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Mongaup Ponds: Quick Lake and Big Rock TrailsTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.6 mi. 1922 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is "relatively" flat and there are no "views". There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger's Loop. At Gravestone Junction turn right to walk the Logger's Loop to Times Square. Turn right to take the Big Rock Trail up to the junction with the Flynn Trail. The hike up the hill is about 1.1 miles and gains 600 feet. At the Flynn Trail continue straight ahead on the snowmobile trail as it heads liver to Mongaup Pond. The first part of the snowmobile trail gains some elevation to a high point. The 2.25 mile walk to Mongaup Pond is mostly downhill after cresting the hill. There isn't much to see along the way but the walk is pleasant enough. You will arrive at the loop road at about 4.3 miles. Turn left to walk the road to the blue Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail marked after a short distance by a sign. Turn left to follow the trail north around the upper part of the pond. At the head end of the pond the Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail turns slightly left to head north toward Hardenburgh and the Beaverkill Road. Stay on the path around the pond which is also a snowmobile trail. Walked about half a mile on a slight uphill to the junction with the yellow. Mongaup Willowemoc Trail. This trail starts out pretty flat but in a very short distance ascends and the descends a hill. At 6.5 miles arrive at Butternut Junction where the Mongaup Willowemoc Trail continues southeast to Willowemoc. Turn right on the snowmobile trail which is named the Azeala Loop. It heads mostly southwest and back toward the Mongaup Road. This trail meanders back and forth and is fairly long. Keep hiking as the trail turns one way and then the other. After hiking 2.9 miles from Butternut Junction you will arrive at a woods road that was once a public road between the Mongaup Road and Terwilliger Road. Turn right and begin hiking downhill for the next .8 miles. Downhill should be fun and relaxing but numerous rocks and washouts along the trail made this downhill harder. Cross the small bridge that spans Mongaup Creek, and walk out to the road and up Beech Mountain Road back to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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(The image the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Friday ViewTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 2.3 mi. 1500 ft. GPSies

link to topo map From Grahamsville, turn onto Route 52A near the TriValley School. Stay on the road until the hamlet of Sundown where the road turns left. Bear to the right on Peekamoose Rd. and continue on the road looking for Moonhaw Rd. on the left. From Route 28, turn west on Route 28A and then head south. Turn right and head west on Watson Hollow Road, the road that goes to Peekamoose and Sundown. Watch for Moonhaw Road on the right after about mile. Turn onto Moonhaw Rd. and drive to the end. Park on the right just before the gates to the private driveway.

Since this is a bushwhack all the way your route may vary. From the parking area, cross Wittenberg Brook and turn right to walk parallel to the brook on a woods road for about .1 miles. Turn left and UP the mountain. The climb will be steep no matter what route you pick and there will be some rock scrambles and some ledges to negotiate. As you climb be sure to stop occasionally and look behind you for views of Friday and Balsam Cap. You may even get a view of the cabin on the shoulder of Friday. Your views will depend on the season and the leaf coverage. As you near the top of the unnamed mountain the underbrush gets VERY thick. It is almost impossible to push across the ridge to the northwest. Continue north or a little northeast to drop down off the ridge. You may find a woods road or path on the other side. Walk about .4 miles or so and then head back up and over the ridge in a generally southwest direction. long this walk you may have views of Samuel's Point. As you hit the top of the ridge push back through the brush and head for the edge of the ledges. Start to work your way down the hill north of your ascent route. This route is less steep and has less brush. You may find a woods road or two along the way. Once you are near Wittenberg Brook turn left or southeast to follow the brook back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the anticlockwise hiking route.)

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(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)


Giant LedgeTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.2 mi. 1190 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Park at the trailhead on the Frost Valley Road just after Winnisook Lake on the hairpin turn. Find the yellow-blazed Phoenicia-East Branch trail and hike .65 miles to the blue-blazed Giant Ledge - Panther Mountain Trail. This ascent is rather gradual with a few short, steep areas thrown in. After about .75 miles, you reach Giant Ledge. Here there are a series of ledges that look to the east and offer a view of Wittenberg and Slide. The return hike simply reverses the trip out. The total distance is just over 3 miles making it perfect to get into shape.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. This profile only reflects the hike out to Giant Ledge. The hike back is the same only in reverse; descending rather than ascending.)


Giant Ledge with bushwhackTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.5 mi. 1437 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Park at the trailhead on the Frost Valley Road just after Winnisook Lake on the hairpin turn. Find the yellow-blazed Phoenicia-East Branch trail and hike .65 miles to the blue-blazed Giant Ledge - Panther Mountain Trail. This ascent is rather gradual with a few short, steep areas thrown in. After about .75 miles, you reach Giant Ledge. Here there are a series of ledges that look to the east and offer a view of Wittenberg and Slide. Continue on the trail until you are in the col, the lowest point between Giant Ledge and Panther. Turn right to begin your bushwhack and walk down the slope to an area of flat ground at the base of the ridges. This is an interesting place to explore. There are several wetlands areas that are interesting. You can work your way up to the base of the cliffs and even climb up on the debris below. Keep heading on a course parallel to the cliffs and you will soon be back on the main trail back to the car. . The total distance is just over 4.5 miles making it perfect to get into shape.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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(The image below shows the profile of the hike.)


Gifford Hollow to Willsie RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.8 mi. 830 ft. GPSies

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Follow Route 30 into Middleburgh and turn right to head east on Route 145 to Cotton Hill Road just outside of town. Turn left on Cotton Hill Road and drive 8.3 miles to Route 443, the Helderburg Trail. Make a left and drive 1.3 miles to Switz Kill Road (CR-1). Turn right and follow it 4.0 miles to Gifford Hollow Road on the right. Park on the shoulder of the road at the intersection. Start by walking south on Switz Kill Road for about .7 miles. Turn left onto Willsie Road which is flat momentarily and then begins to climb gently up a hill. As you climb up the hill and reach the top at 1.8 miles there are nice views across Partridge Run to the Catskills. Continue to walk along the road. At 2.1 miles the blazes on a telephone pole indicate a left turn. There seems to be a woods road on the left but just passed this the trail turned into the woods. Walk uphill and then down through some stands of pine and spruce with hardwoods between them. There are several stone walls to cross. At 3.1 miles cross Irish Hill Road where there is a shale pit and room to park a few cars. The trail ascends briefly and the aqua blazes share the trees with state cross country ski trail markers. As you walk along the trail pay attention to the blazes as there are numerous woods roads, trails and ski trails that cross the path. In general, the aqua blazes are good enough to guide your course. Begin to walk along an escarpment at about 3.3 miles. Cross several more stone walls as you reach the highest point on the hike at 3.75 miles. Here it looks as if the trail continues straight ahead but the blazes lead to the right. Start to descend through some pines until you intersected Woolsie Road at 4.2 miles. Turn right on Willsie Road to hike back to the car.


(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Giggle HollowTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.2 mi. 1575 ft. GPSies

link to topo map From Route 28 turn west on Friendship Road just southeast of Pine Hill. Drive to the covered bridge. If the gate is open, drive across and park in the lot near the top of the hill. If the gate is closed, park on Friendship Road southeast of the access road across the bridge. Walk across the bridge and up the access road to where the road turns right. Continue straight ahead to an area that had a pavilion. Walk to the back of the area where there is a register box at the beginning of the trail which is blazed accessional with blue discs. There are also signs indicating distances to various points. The trail passes directly under railroad tracks that run across a bridge.As you start up the trail realize that UP is the most important word since for the next .9 miles the trail follows a woods roads to the southwest averaging a 20% grade. The trail is marked as unmaintained on the maps and this is a good description. The woods road is rocky and a layer of slippery leaves can add to the difficulty of the climb. The blue trail markers are few and are often missing when another trail or road branches off. There can be quite a bit of blowdown on the trail which can be navigated around but certainly doesn't add to the enjoyment of the experience. At 1.1 miles the trail turns 90 degree to the left to head southeast. The trail continues to climb but at a gentler grade to 1.5 miles where it turns to the west. The grade now is more shallow at this point. After about .25 miles the trail opens up and the area may be filled with briars. It is difficult to tell where the trail goes but look carefully ahead to find the next blue marker. Keep heading west to find the trail junction. Turn right and head down the Pine Hill West Branch Trail toward Pine Hill. For the next .9 miles follow the trail as it heads north and down the mountain. At just passed 3 miles the trail meets a dirt road. Turn left onto the road to follow it west as it continues to descend. At 3.4 miles the road turns to the northeast and at 3.7 miles the paved road known as Woodchuck Hollow Road begins. Watch for a gated road or driveway on the right complete with stone pillars. Walk under the railroad bridge on Mill Street.Turn right on Bonnieview Avenue and then right onto Main Street. It is only a short walk down Main Street to Lake Street. At the end of Lake Street walk passed the gate and onto the road that leads back to Belleayre Beach. After a short walk the lake comes into view with a white sand beach and small building. Visit the beach if you would like then walk across the parking lot to complete the loop. Follow the road won the hill to the left and across the covered bridge to your car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and clockwise loop hiking route.)

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(The image below shows the profile of the hike.)


Glenwood Rd to Route 94Trails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.7 mi 1070 ft GPSies

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Drive over the New York New Jersey line on the Pulaski Highway which soon become Route 517. Watch for a right hand turn onto Route 565 which is Glenwood Road. Pass Vernon Township High School on the left with a blinking light. About .4 miles after this, the AT crosses the road with a small pulloff on the right. If you reach Glenwood Mountain Road, you have gone too far. Cross the street and walk up the wooden stairs to get on the AT. The first .9 miles of trail heads southeast through some hardwood forest. You will gain a little elevation and then lose it as you pass by Vernon Township High School. You may be able to hear students on the athletic fields and you will cross several paths or ATV tracks. After gaining the top of a small hill, there is a continuous descent for the next .7 miles which results in losing 385 feet to where the trail crosses Route 517. As you reach the road you may find a number of cars parked along the shoulder. The Pochuck Boardwalk is very popular. Cross the road to start the boardwalk. The boardwalk is an impressive feat as it is a sturdy structure that crosses Pochuck Marsh and Pochuck Creek. It stretches about a mile and has a suspension bridge that spans the creek. The boardwalk is two to three feet above the level of the marsh and is supported by steel pipes driven into the underlying strata. Occasional steel cables tether the structure in place. The vegetation along the edges of the walk is usually trimmed back in all places where it is possible. The boardwalk stops where the trail enters the woods and then begins on the other side. Watch for red-winged blackbird, turtles, snakes and many other animals. At 2.3 miles you will approach Pochuck Creek which is spanned by a suspension bridge. This is a truly remarkable structure which stands at least 15 feet above the level of the creek. It is well-anchored on both ends and has sturdy cables which hold the deck in place. Continued along the boardwalk until it enters the woods on the other side of the swamp. The trail remains flat and crosses a small stream on a bridge and then crosses Wawayanda Creek on a larger bridge. You will come to a path which looks like a rail trail and is marked as Canal Road on most maps. Turn right and walk a few feet to where the trail turns off to the left. There are some wet areas between you and Route 94 which are crossed by puncheons. At 3.7 miles cross the Conrail tracks. Stiles are provided to cross the fencing that was erected on either side of the tracks but the parade of hikers has pushed the fence aside making them unnecessary. On the other side of the tracks is an open field with Route 94 just beyond. The field can be pretty wet and puncheons stretch across it almost to the road. On the other side of the road is Wawayanda Mountain. When you reach the road, you may turn around or cross to the parking area on the other side and read the sign board. When you are ready, turn around and reverse your route to get back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Glenwood Rd to Wallkill RefugeTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.7 mi 1960 ft GPSies

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Drive over the New York New Jersey line on the Pulaski Highway which soon becomes Route 517. Watch for a right hand turn onto Route 565 which is Glenwood Road. Pass Vernon Township High School on the left with a blinking light. About .4 miles after this, the AT crosses the road with a small pulloff on the right. If you reach Glenwood Mountain Road, you have gone too far. The first .1 miles is a slight downhill and there are some puncheons over marshy ground before an ascent of about 1 mile. At about .6 miles the trail we crosses a dirt road labeled Louemma Lane. Continue to hike to the top of a small hill gaining almost 500 feet in the first mile. After a slight drop, you will again gain about the same elevation and come to a lookout. The viewpoint is limited but you can see what looks like a marsh below. This is the Wallkill National Wildlife Refuge. The trail travels mostly through hardwood forest and is a mixture of packed dirt in some spots and rocky traverses in others. From the viewpoint the trail starts a gentle descent which turns into a steeper, rockier descent a little further on. You will lose over 500 feet of elevation in just .6 miles. The trail crosses Lake Wallkill Road and then runs about .5 miles through a rather damp area. Puncheons elevate the trail out of the marshy ground for a good part of this distance. At the end you will come to a wide "road" on the edge of a marsh. The trail turns left here and follows an old railroad grade for .25 miles before turning right. Continue around the marsh and after about .5 miles make another right turn. At about 5 miles make another right turn onto a path that parallels Oil City Road. The path along the road is about .5 miles. At the end make a right turn back onto the railroad grade. In another .5 miles you will be back at the spot where the AT comes out of the woods. Turn left and head back toward the car. Most of the climbs are easier than they were as descents. There isn't too much remarkable along the trail but you might stop at the viewpoint again. Return to the car by retracing your route from earlier

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Greystone Fire TowerTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficulty 0 mi 0 ft GPSies

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This was a hard tower to find but an easy one to hike. There is an access road that goes directly to the tower. The map and profiles here show parking at then of the access road but this is not really necessary. At 92 feet Greystone is the tallest tower in New Jersey. From Route 10 heading east toward Denville turn right on Miller Mountain Road. After only .25 miles, bear right on Zeek Road. Follow Zeek Road until it ends at Casterline Road. Turn right on Casterline and then right again on the unmarked access road. Drive to the end of the road and park near the tower. You will have to visit this tower during fire season as it is fenced and cannot be climbed unless an observer is present.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Almost Perpendicular and Claudius Smith DenTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.3 mi. 1926 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain traffic circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive until the Reeves Education Center appears on your left. Take the next right and immediately turn right again onto Johnsontown Road. Park on the edge of the traffic circle at the end of the road.

Walk back toward the road from the traffic circle and look for the blue disc trail. The blue disc trail turns up the hill to the northwest just before entering the traffic circle. The first part runs along the access road for maintenance of a gas pipeline. The trail then cuts into the woods and parallels the pipeline briefly before heading more northwest. After about .85 miles of hiking a high rock formation appears on the left. You may go off the trail and up to the lookout where there are limited views. Back on the main trail continue to hike and almost immediately you will hit a very steep little climb which is hardly perpendicular! The top is about 960 feet in elevation and only a mile from the start of the hike. It offers excellent views particularly to the south and east. Continue your hike down from the viewpoint into a little "valley" surrounded by several high rock formations. The trail then ascends Pound Mountain and descends again as it approaches Elbow Brush at about 1.9 miles. Elbow Brush is a narrow passage between the bedrock and a piece that has pulled away over the years. This area can be avoided in one of several ways but it is interesting and not all that narrow. In this area there are other jumbles of rocks with some places to walk through. Continue to hike to the junction with the Tuxedo Mount Ivy Trail. This trail runs roughly east-west but you want to continue on the blue disc trail. The blue discs may be hard to find as they proceed straight ahead and directly up the rock face to another viewpoint at 2.3 miles. Just across on the next hill you can see Smith's Rock but it is hard to determine where Claudius Smith's "den" is located. To get to the "hideout", go back to the trail junction and take the red Tuxedo Mt Ivy trail west to the base of the cliff that forms the lookout. You will would find the "den" there within a few hundred feet. It first appears as an opening on the right of the trail. You can walk into this "cave" and make your way to the other side. Back on the trail walk to the base of the cliff to find the rest of the den in the form of a rock overhang. There is a fire pit here. Smith was raised in Brookhaven on Long Island but his family moved to Smith' Clove (Monroe) in the early 1740's. His family was well-respected and when war broke out many became Loyalists. Claudius led a band of men who defended the Loyalists in Orange County and attacked the rebels. Eventually he became so notorious that Governor George Clinton offered a $1200 reward for his capture. Claudius Smith was hanged in Goshen, NY in 1179 as were two of his sons. After inspecting the den and rock formations, go back up to the blue disc trail. You will pass by a large rock that appears to have primitive petroglyphs painted on it. The scene depicts hunters with weapons attacking some animal with a series of trees in the background. On closer inspection the work looks more modern than ancient. Finding the blue disc trail after the lookout can be difficult. Walk down the open rock face watching for the markings which head off slightly to the right. There are only a few faded blazes on the rock. The trail starts to descend after crossing over another viewpoint and at about 3.4 miles start to look for the junction with the Victory Trail marked with blue V's. Turn left or west and hike a short distance to the trail junction with the Ramapo Dunderberg Trail heading southwest. This is relatively flat between some hills on the east and a drop off to the west. Begin looking for some evidence of the Black Ash mines like the tailings piles. At about 4.0 miles you will notice a tailings pile to the left of the trail. Walk up to it and find one of the openings for the Black Ash mine just behind it. The adit is flooded but still interesting. Walk down to the trail and continue south and find a second adit to the Black Ash mine very near the trail on the right. The trail continues to be open and easy to follow and at 4.7 miles there is a nice viewpoint down to Tuxedo and the Thruway. This lookout also has views to the hills beyond. The trail begins to descend as it approaches Tuxedo Park and the Thruway. Just after descending to a small parking area, turn left or south-southeast on the white Kakiat Trail which will help you complete the loop back to the blue disc trail and the car. The Dater Mine is near the trail junction with the blue disc trail. The Kakiat Trail follows a woods road and immediately begins to ascend to an old telephone line right-of-way. The ascent is only about .3 miles and about 200 feet. As you near the junction with the blue disc trail various paths and roads lead up the mountain toward the direction of the Dater Mine. From here it is only .2 miles to the blue disc trail and .7 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Anthony Wayne LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.9 mi. 1540 ft. GPSies

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Take the Long Mountain Parkway to the Long Mountain traffic circle. From there get on the Palisades parkway south for one exit south to the Anthony Wayne Recreation Area. Pay the entrance fee if it is the season and park in the large parking area.From the car walk back to the bridge over the parkway where you will see white marking for the Anthony Wayne Trail. The trail soon cuts right or north into the woods. Followed it as it gains some elevation to about .6 miles. Watch for the blue blazed 1779 Trail on your left as you start to descend. It may be hard to spot as the disks are faded and there is no sign to call your attention to the trail. Over the next mile or so the trail keeps gaining some elevation but really seems quite flat. At 2.1 miles the trail begins to descend and at about 2.4 miles you will be at the junction with the AT where you should turn left. The trail now descends until it crosses the Palisades Parkway.Once on the other side continue to lose elevation until about 3 miles when the trail begins to ascend the West Mountain ridge. The ascent is about 600 feet in the next .7 miles. Some parts of the trail are steeper than others but there are several switchbacks to help make the trip easier if not shorter. Continued climbing until we you are near the top of the ridge. and watch as the AT markings go to the left with little notice. Turn north or left and follow the AT which is also marked with blue blazes in this area for the Timp-Torne Trail. On a nice day, it is worth the side-trip to head south to the West Mountain Shelter which offers a great view toward the south on the Hudson River. On a good day the New York City skyline is clearly visible. As you hike north along the ridge, there are many views to the west and several opportunities to get a view east as well. The views to the west are mostly of forest but the views to the east and north include a few peeks at the river and Bear Mountain. As you continue north the Perkins Tower on Bear Mountain becomes more and more prominent. You will begin losing elevation and at about 4.5 miles the AT heads to the right. Stay to the left on the blue trail. Continue north and begin to look for the Fawn Trail marked with a red F. At one point the trail becomes very narrow requiring you to slip between some rocks. Just after this you will have to descend over an open rock face. Just below this is the trail intersection with the Fawn Trail back to the Anthony Wayne Recreation Area. Follow this trail as it continues down off the ridge. Eventually the trail crosses some of the woods roads associated with the park and within a few minutes you will be back at the road that leaves the park. Cross the road and walk over to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Boston, Garfield, Greenwood, Surebridge MinesTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.6 mi. 1825 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. Just passed Lake Tiorati there are two lakes, one on each side of the road. These are Lakes Askoti and Skanatati. Pull into the parking area on the right next to Lake Skanatati. This lake is larger than it looks as you will see when you hike along the shore and see it from above. The trails start to the right of the lake. Bear to the left on the Long Path marked with aqua paint. As you walk along this path there are several opportunities to walk down to the lake to get a better view. After following the shoreline of the lake the Long Path continues west and then turns north. At 1.1 miles the Long Path meets the yellow marked Dunning Trail.

Bear left on the Dunning Trail past the workings of the Hogencamp Mine on the right. There is a swamp on the left and some tailings from the mine. The trail ascends a hill to an area that overlooks Little Long Pond. Continue up the hill to a long flat area of bedrock. There are several large boulders lying on the flat area. these are called the Bowling rocks. The trail winds down and up until it meets the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail after about 1.2 miles. Just to the left up the RD Trail is the area known as the Bald Rocks. The exposed bedrock in this area has interesting striations. Continue on the Dunning Trail through this area.

In .25 miles the Dunning Trail meets and runs concurrently with the White Bar Trail for another .25 miles. At this point turn right to stay on the Dunning Trail. Stay on the Dunning Trail and in about .3 miles begin to look for mine tailings. This is the Boston Mine. There are two surface pits with their associated tailings. To find the Island Pond Road walk north or slightly northeast until you see the red triangles that mark the Arden-Surebridge Trail. Turn left on this trail and follow it until it meets the road. After several hundred feet the ASB Trail turns left. Continue on the road until it forks and take the left fork. The road appears to end but work your way through the laurel until you are almost at the lake shore. Here you will find an exploratory pit and a water filled trench. There are also some tailings from the Garfield Mine. Walk back out to where the road forks and take the right fork. This part of the road ends on the shore of Island Pond. The pond is beautiful and the ruins of an old stone ranger station can be found here.

Turn around and take the road back to where the ASB Trail meets the road. Turn left onto the trail. this trail heads southeast and then turns northeast as it heads toward the Lemon Squeezer about 1.6 miles away. The trail initially is relatively flat but then climbs to the top of a ridge. From here it goes up and down until the Lemon Squeezer. Stop here an spend some time investigating the lemon Squeezer. The AT ascends through this area but you will be returning to the ASB Trail after finishing at the Lemon Squeezer. Continue on the SB Trail and the Long Path for about .25 miles until the Bottle Cap Trail leaves to the left. The Bottle Cap Trail is marked by bottle caps nailed to the trees. The trail immediately ascends to the top of Surebridge Mountain. Continue on the trail over the top of the ridge and down the other side to a wet area to find the Surebridge Mine Trail. The total distance on the trail is about .6 miles and a stone cairn marks the road.

Turn left on the road and walk .6 miles to the Greenwood Mine. Watch for the white blazes of the AT on the right and almost immediately after that the tailings of the mine on the left and a mine opening on the right. The opening is filled with water. Continue on the trail to find another trench on the right. Turn right and walk up the hillside. Wander around looking for mine tailings. Above the mine tailings there will always be a mine working of some kind. The Greenwood mine has several trenches some with underground openings. Return to the road and walk .6 miles back to the Bottle Cap Trail junction. Stay on the mine road and watch for the first workings of the Surebridge Mine on the left. Walk off the trail to the left. There are several piles of tailings. Look for three different trenches at least one of which appears to extend underground. There are several exploratory pits and one deep shaft. The shaft is vertical but seems to turn horizontally at the bottom. Most of these workings are filled with water. Return to the mine road.

After .35 miles you will join the ASB Trail and the Long Path and the trail junction called Times Square. Find the Long Path and walk .4 miles over the hill to the Hogencamp Mine. Another .4 miles takes you to the Dunning Trail Long Path junction where you began the loop earlier in the day. Walk 1.1 miles back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Bradley MineTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 2.8 mi. 800 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Drive 3.7 miles and park at the Lake Tiorati parking area. Walk up to Arden Road which is closed during the winter. Walk on the road for .5 miles where the Long Path crosses the road. The road turns ninety degrees to the left at this point. Walk another .3 miles along the road and watch for a woods road that cuts up and to the right. Walk up the road and the entrance to the Bradley Mine cut will appear directly ahead. Walk into the cut to the end where the actual entrance to the underground is located. The mine is usually filled with water. It is possible to enter this cavern during the dry season. Notice the air shaft up and to the right. Walk back out through the cut and around the opening to the left. Walk up the hillside to find the opening to the air shaft. You can now wander over the hillside and up to the top of the hill. There are not too many additional evidences of mining activity. A large, flat work area is evident at the top and there is a nice view to the west. After looking around, retrace your steps to the road. Walk to road back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route out and back.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Cranberry, Spanish, Silver, Lewis MinesTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.8 mi. 1477 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Drive 1.5 miles and park at the Silvermine Lake parking area. Walk about .5 miles northeast back up Seven lakes Drive. Just after an abandoned comfort station on the right is a brook that runs under the road. Turn left and walk up the left side of the brook. You may see an informal path where other hikers have walked but no specific trail exists. In .3 miles a woods road runs east-west. Turn left or west and walk a short distance to find the opening of the Cranberry Mine. The mine extends into the hillside for almost 100 feet. The adit has been walled up and an iron door once blocked the entrance. You may walk into the mine but it is VERY dark and a good light is a must! On the floor of the mine is the a single gauge railroad track used for ore carts.

Walk back out the entrance and head slightly northeast to find an iron door in front of a corrugated tin roof. This may have been a powder magazine or storage facility. Walk up the hillside and look for other piles of mine waste. There are at least two other shallow trenches and one air shaft. After investigating the mine workings, walk back down the mine road to the brook and back out to the road. Cross the road and follow the woods road to the bridge over the stream. This is the Silvermine Ski Road. Continue on the road for 1.1 miles to the junction with the AT and Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Along the way you can visit the dam at the outlet of Silvermine Lake and there are several nice viewpoints for the lake.

Turn left on the trail and get ready for a short but steep ascent of Black Mountain. After the first part of the ascent there is a nice lookout over Silvermine Lake. Continue on the trail to the top of the mountain about .4 miles away from the trail junction. The summit of Black Mountain has a nice view of the Hudson River and of the Perkins Tower on Bear Mountain. Look for piles of tailings and a small, deep pit which is the Spanish Mine. Walk back up the hillside parallel to the trail to find another pile of mine waste and another pit or trench. Get back on the trail and descend the steep rock outcropping. At the base of this outcropping look for a path around to the other side of the rock face. The footing here is difficult. Walk along and look at the rock face. After a short distance, you will see a hole blasted into the side of the mountain with a small amount of mine waste below it. This is the Silver Mine although silver was probably never the object. Return to the main trail and hike back down black Mountain to the junction of the ski road and the AT and RD Trails.

Continue on the trails up and down over some varied terrain. After .8 miles, descend a rock area to the William Brien Memorial Shelter. This is a rock shelter with four wooden bunk beds. Turn right onto the yellow blazed Menomine Trail which winds its way back to the parking area along the western shore of Silvermine Lake. After 1.6 miles, you will be back to the Silvermine Lake parking area. Continue to follow the Menomine Trail through the parking and picnic areas to Seven Lakes Drive. Cross Seven lakes Drive and continue on the trail for .2 miles until it starts around Lake Nawahunta. Bear right on the Nawahunta Fire Road and watch for the opening to the Lewis Mine on the right opposite a swamp on the left. The trench that forms the Lewis Mine extends a short distance into the hillside. Back at the trail-road junction there is a stone foundation on the lake side of the trail. It is not clear what this may have been but its structure suggests it was a storage building. Walk back out to the road and return .4 miles to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Doodletown and The MinesTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.3 mi. 1850 ft. GPSies

link to topo map The easiest place to park to start this hike is at the Bear Mountain Inn parking area next to Hessian Lake. Parking costs $6 per car but there is lots of it and bathroom facilities are available. There area several ways to get to the parking area but Route 9W north or south is the easiest way. You can also take Seven Lakes Drive from Long Mountain Parkway (Route 6). Stay on Seven Lakes Drive through another traffic circle. Park in the back parking area. Walk toward the "tunnel" that goes under Perkins Drive. Bear to your right and head towards the other tunnel. Before entering, look at the sign which shows the settlement of Doodletown. These signs occur several times along the 1777 Trail that goes through this late 19th and early 20th century site. The building sites are all numbered, a plaque has been placed near all the major sites and some include an explanation and sketch of the building All the remaining buildings were razed in 1957 so that all that remains are the stone foundations, stone steps and the cemeteries. Enter the tunnel and get on the 1777E Trail.

After .5 miles on the 1777E Trail, you will reach the junction of the red blazed 1777 Trail to the right and the blue blazed Cornell Mine Trail to the left. Bear right onto the 1777 Trail. In another, .5 miles a sign pointing to the left indicates a path to a swimming hole and waterfall. Only a few hundred feet down this path is a bridge over a small stream. There is a nice cascade here with rapids and a deep pool at the base of the falls. The path continues but turn around after enjoying the babbling brook and return to the main path. All of the "trails" here are wide woods roads and some show signs of pavement. Back on the main path you will begin your walk through the Doodletown settlement. The first site is the foundation of the Steinman home. Further down the path is the area were the old schoolhouse stood on the right side of the trail. On the left side is a man made pond.

Continue up the road following the red dot on a white rectangle markings of the 1777 Trail. Where the trail bears to the left is the site of the Siegel home. Further up the road are the steps of the Dunkel house on the right. A little further up the road on the left is the lane that leads to the Herbert/Weyant cemetery. This is about .6 miles from the trail junction and the waterfall path. Many of the grave markers have the names of the members of these two prominent families. Walk back out to the main trail and continue on up the hill. There are numerous home sites marked by stone pillars, foundations or simple signs. As you continue on the road, you will see the outline of Bald Mountain on the left. The mountain looks steep and uninviting at first, however, the trail that you are on wraps around to the more gentle ascent on the opposite side. After walking up another small hill the signage indicates the end of Doodletown settlement. The wide and open road reverts to more of a trail but is still relatively easy walking.

After 1.4 miles from the cemetery lane the red blazed Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail crosses the 1777 Trail. Turn left here and be prepared for a path that is more of a trail; narrow and with more elevation changes. Soon you will be climbing Bald Mountain. The trail initially climbs a small rock outcropping and then descends into a hardwood forest and crosses a small stream. It then ascends to another higher point before dropping a little. The trail then begins the climb up Bald Mountain. Near the summit the trail undulates some before arriving at the summit. The summit is about .7 miles from the junction with the 1777 Trail. The views from the summit are magnificent. The Perkins Tower on Bear Mountain is clearly visible. The Hudson River lies below with the Bear Mountain Bridge, Anthony's Nose, Mount Taurus, Storm King and Breakneck Ridge to the north. From this point you can get back on the R-D Trail and follow it to the junction with the Cornell Mine Trail or you can walk north over the "edge" of Bald Mountain to look for the Cornell Mine.

To find the Cornell Mine walk north down the slope of the mountain and head slightly right or east. Look for many small to medium sized rocks in a pile. These are tailings from the iron mines. Many of these rocks will show "rust". You may find several open pits and gashes cut into the hillside. These are part of the mining complex but a more interesting mine is to be found. Further down the slope is the main entrance to the Cornell Mine which is cut directly into the bedrock of the mountain. The tailing from the mine lie below it on the slope. The mine adit is usually filled with water except in the driest times. The tunnel appears to be block just a short distance into the mine. After exploring, continue east along the slope looking for the red markings of the R-D Trail or the blue ones from the Cornell Mine Trail. If you hit the R-D first, turn left and continue down until the Cornell Mine Trail branches to the left.

Be careful as you descend the Cornell Mine Trail. The initial descent is steep and strewn with rocks some of which are covered by leaves. This can be a slippery, unstable situation leading to falls and injuries. The rocks grow into boulders lower down the trail until it flattens and the trail widens and passes through hardwood trees. After about .85 miles, there is a junction with a woods road . On top of a hill on your left is ANOTHER mine. Walk over toward this hill. If you skirt the top of the hill to the right, you will see the mine tailings. Walk to the top of the hill and look for a depression in the earth. This is not just a pit but a shaft sunk into the rock. The Edison is Thomas Edison who experimented with magnetically separating the iron from the ore. This "loop" is about .3 miles. Walk back to the trail and continue toward Route 202.

In about .5 miles the trail passes very close to Doodletown Brook and an area where there is a nice waterfall and swimming hole. In fact, this is the SAME place you were and the beginning of the hike but you are on the other side of the brook. Walk down to the brook to get a better look at the water. There are several areas of rapids and a man made dam. After exploring some, return to the trail. Route 202 is just .1 miles further down the trail. Just before the road is another nice section of rapids. At the highway turn left and walk a short distance on the left shoulder before turning left and continuing on the Cornell Mine Trail. Climb Grays Hill which was once part of the King's Road and then the Albany Road. Follow the blue trail markers as the trail turns off the paved path to the right and heads up through some brush. This part of the trail is often wet! In .25 miles you will be back at the junction with the 1777E trail where you were earlier tin the day. Continue straight ahead to retrace your steps through the tunnels and to the parking area only .5 miles away.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Dunderberg Mountain Loop

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.7 mi 2200 ft GPSies

link to topo map The parking for the trail head is on Route 9W about a mile south of the junction with Route 202. It is just north of the Anchor Monument on 9W. Once parked walk south on 9W for a short distance. Watch for a small stake with blaze markings. The blazes should be blue for the Timp-Torne Trail and a red circle on a white background for the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Be prepared to ascend a steep grade up to the first level of the Dunderberg Ridge. Watch for a small laid stone tunnel on your left just as the steep climb begins. As you climb you will begin to get some nice views of the Hudson River, the towns that line it and the power plants that use the water for cooling. These views are nice but nothing compared to the ones you WILL get as you ascend to the top of the ridge.

The trail splits at the top of the short ascent. The blue blazed Timp-Torne trail goes left while the red blazed Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail heads off to the right. Both the trails parallel or cross railway beds that are the remains of an aborted spiral railway from the late 1890's. Although it was never completed much of the work that was done is still visible. Turn left an follow the blue blazes. This trail alternates flat sections along the railbed with steep but short climbs up to the next level of the ridge. Several areas have switchbacks to make the climbing easier. There are also several rock scrambles which keep things interesting. As you hike, keep a lookout for the tunnel entrance blasted into the mountain's rock. It will be on your right and is unmistakable. It was never completed and is a dead end. Just passed the tunnel is a great example of how the railway bed was built up and leveled off. After ascending to the highest point on the one side of the ridge the trail drops a little before the climb up to The Timp. The views from here are excellent to the south, west and north. Almost directly west is West Mountain. Look carefully to spot the West Mountain Shelter. From this point there are several options that vary slightly in distance and difficulty.

The first option is to turn around and return the way you came to the low area where the 1777 trail crosses the Timp-Torne Trail The 1777 trail crosses at the lowest point in the area. Turn left onto this trail and walk for a VERY short distance. Keep a lookout for the red blazed Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail on the right.

Another option is to continue down the Timp-Torne Trail off The Timp for a short distance to the junction with the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Turn right onto the trail marked by the red circles on a white rectangle.

The longest, most difficult and therefore most rewarding option is to continue on the Timp-Torne Trail as it descends into a low area on the other side of the Timp. This is quite a drop from the top of the Timp and is steep at times. The blue trail intersects on old road and turns left following the road for a short distance. The trail then heads right into the woods, up a hill and toward the Torne. Continue on up the road looking for the red and white markers on the right that announce the beginning of the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Follow this trail passed any other trails or roads that turn off of it. The trail skirts the lower edge of the Timp and passes many impressive talus slopes as it winds its way around the Timp. Eventually it turns left and heads STRAIGHT UP THE TIMP! This is a rather long and difficult climb which has few level areas until it nears the top of the Timp. Eventually you will be back at the junction with the blue Timp-Torne Trail near the top of the Timp. DO NOT turn but continue on the read and white marked trail.

The Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail rises and falls several times on the approach to Bald Mountain. The climb up Bald is steep at times but not impossible. Bald has views directly north to Bear Mountain which can be recognized by the Perkins Tower at the top. Looking down and in a northeasterly direction you can easily see the Bear Mountain Bridge. Below the summit of Bald are several depressions and one tunnel that make up the Cornell Mines. Continue on the red blazed trail and pass the point where the blue blazed Cornell Mine trail meets it from the north. You will soon pass over Dunderberg Mountain. This can easily be missed since it is not much higher than the other points on the ridge. As you continue to hike, you will begin to get a hint of the scenic views that the eastern end of this ridge has to offer. Several climbs pass through swampy areas and lead to the eastern end of the ridge. Apparently a forest fire swept through this area since most of the trees are dead and show scorch marks. The dead trees combined with the remaining rock outcroppings gives this area an eerie, desolate appearance. As you reach the top of the easternmost part of the ridge the Hudson comes into view along with the communities and industry that line its shore. The view from the ridge proper is virtually unimpeded but several side trails lead to lookouts with breathtaking views of the river.

The trail turns south and then west as it completes the loop back to where you started. A laid stone pylon is present in the area where the donkey engine was to be place for the spiral railway. From this area the trail is almost all graded railroad bed. Large angular stone do not make the best footing and do not cushion a fall. The trail flattens as it approaches the end. Here there are several more good examples of level railroad bed hinting at the work done on the railway.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Dunderberg Mountain - The Timp Loop

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.8 mi 2323 ft GPSies

link to topo map


The parking for the trail head is on Route 9W about a mile south of the junction with Route 202. It is just north of the Anchor Monument on 9W. Once parked walk south on 9W for a short distance. Watch for a small stake with blaze markings. The blazes should be blue for the Timp-Torne Trail and a red circle on a white background for the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Be prepared to ascend a steep grade up to the first level of the Dunderberg Ridge. Watch for a small laid stone tunnel on your left just as the steep climb begins. As you climb you will begin to get some nice views of the Hudson River, the towns that line it and the power plants that use the water for cooling. These views are nice but nothing compared to the ones you WILL get as you ascend to the top of the ridge.

The trail splits at the top of the short ascent. The blue blazed Timp-Torne trail goes left while the red blazed Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail heads off to the right. Both the trails parallel or cross railway beds that are the remains of an aborted spiral railway from the late 1890's. Although it was never completed much of the work that was done is still visible. Turn left an follow the blue blazes. This trail alternates flat sections along the railbed with steep but short climbs up to the next level of the ridge. Several areas have switchbacks to make the climbing easier. There are also several rock scrambles which keep things interesting. As you hike, keep a lookout for the tunnel entrance blasted into the mountain's rock. It will be on your right and is unmistakable. It was never completed and is a dead end. Just passed the tunnel is a great example of how the railway bed was built up and leveled off. After ascending to the highest point on the one side of the ridge the trail drops a little before the climb up to The Timp. The views from here are excellent to the south, west and north. Almost directly west is West Mountain. Look carefully to spot the West Mountain Shelter. From this point there are several options that vary slightly in distance and difficulty.

The first option is to turn around and return the way you came to the low area where the 1777 trail crosses the Timp-Torne Trail The 1777 trail crosses at the lowest point in the area. Turn left onto this trail and walk for a VERY short distance. Keep a lookout for the red blazed Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail on the right.

Another option is to continue down the Timp-Torne Trail off The Timp for a short distance to the junction with the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Turn right onto the trail marked by the red circles on a white rectangle.

The longest, most difficult and therefore most rewarding option is to continue on the Timp-Torne Trail as it descends into a low area on the other side of the Timp. This is quite a drop from the top of the Timp and is steep at times. The blue trail intersects on old road and turns left following the road for a short distance. The trail then heads right into the woods, up a hill and toward the Torne. Continue on up the road looking for the red and white markers on the right that announce the beginning of the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Follow this trail passed any other trails or roads that turn off of it. The trail skirts the lower edge of the Timp and passes many impressive talus slopes as it winds its way around the Timp. Eventually it turns left and heads STRAIGHT UP THE TIMP! This is a rather long and difficult climb which has few level areas until it nears the top of the Timp. Eventually you will be back at the junction with the blue Timp-Torne Trail near the top of the Timp. DO NOT turn but continue on the read and white marked trail.

The Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail rises and falls several times on the approach to Bald Mountain. The climb up Bald is steep at times but not impossible. Bald has views directly north to Bear Mountain which can be recognized by the Perkins Tower at the top. Looking down and in a northeasterly direction you can easily see the Bear Mountain Bridge. Below the summit of Bald are several depressions and one tunnel that make up the Cornell Mines. Continue on the red blazed trail and pass the point where the blue blazed Cornell Mine trail meets it from the north. You will soon pass over Dunderberg Mountain. This can easily be missed since it is not much higher than the other points on the ridge. As you continue to hike, you will begin to get a hint of the scenic views that the eastern end of this ridge has to offer. Several climbs pass through swampy areas and lead to the eastern end of the ridge. Apparently a forest fire swept through this area since most of the trees are dead and show scorch marks. The dead trees combined with the remaining rock outcroppings gives this area an eerie, desolate appearance. As you reach the top of the easternmost part of the ridge the Hudson comes into view along with the communities and industry that line its shore. The view from the ridge proper is virtually unimpeded but several side trails lead to lookouts with breathtaking views of the river.

The trail turns south and then west as it completes the loop back to where you started. A laid stone pylon is present in the area where the donkey engine was to be place for the spiral railway. From this area the trail is almost all graded railroad bed. Large angular stone do not make the best footing and do not cushion a fall. The trail flattens as it approaches the end. Here there are several more good examples of level railroad bed hinting at the work done on the railway.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Dunderberg Mountain Loop to The Timp

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.0 mi 2263 ft GPSies

link to topo map

The parking for the trail head is on Route 9W about a mile south of the junction with Route 202. It is just north of the Anchor Monument on 9W. Once parked walk south on 9W for a short distance. Watch for a small stake with blaze markings. The blazes should be blue for the Timp-Torne Trail and a red circle on a white background for the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Be prepared to ascend a steep grade up to the first level of the Dunderberg Ridge. Watch for a small laid stone tunnel on your left just as the steep climb begins. As you climb you will begin to get some nice views of the Hudson River, the towns that line it and the power plants that use the water for cooling. These views are nice but nothing compared to the ones you WILL get as you ascend to the top of the ridge.

The trail splits at the top of the short ascent. The blue blazed Timp-Torne trail goes left while the red blazed Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail heads off to the right. Both the trails parallel or cross railway beds that are the remains of an aborted spiral railway from the late 1890's. Although it was never completed much of the work that was done is still visible. Turn left an follow the blue blazes. This trail alternates flat sections along the railbed with steep but short climbs up to the next level of the ridge. Several areas have switchbacks to make the climbing easier. There are also several rock scrambles which keep things interesting. As you hike, keep a lookout for the tunnel entrance blasted into the mountain's rock at about 1 mile into your hike. It will be on your right and is unmistakable. It was never completed and is a dead end. Just passed the tunnel is a great example of how the railway bed was built up and leveled off. Continue on the blue trail and you will cross the 1777 Trail at 2.6 miles. You will begin to climb to a high point an a rock outcrop. This is marked as the Timp on some maps and GPS units but it is not. After ascending to this high point on the ridge the trail drops a little before the climb up to The Timp. At 3 miles you will come to the junction with the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Stay to the left on the blue Timp-Torne Trail to get to the Timp. The views from the summit are excellent to the south, west and north. Slightly to the northwest is West Mountain. Look carefully to spot the West Mountain Shelter. More to the north is the Perkins Tower on Bear Mountain and below it the Bear Mountain Bridge. To the south you can see the New York City skyline.

Retrace your steps to back down the Timp to the junction with the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Turn left to start your return trip. Follow this trail passed any other trails or roads that turn off of it. The Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail rises and falls several times on the approach to Bald Mountain. The climb up Bald is steep at times but not impossible. There are views directly north to Bear Mountain which can be recognized by the Perkins Tower at the top. Looking down and in a northeasterly direction you can easily see the Bear Mountain Bridge. Below the summit of Bald are several depressions and one tunnel that make up the Cornell Mines. Continue on the red blazed trail and pass the point where the blue blazed Cornell Mine trail meets it from the north. You will soon pass over Dunderberg Mountain. This can easily be missed since it is not much higher than the other points on the ridge. As you continue to hike, you will begin to get a hint of the scenic views that the eastern end of this ridge has to offer. Several climbs pass through swampy areas and lead to the eastern end of the ridge. Apparently a forest fire swept through this area since most of the trees are dead and show scorch marks. The dead trees combined with the remaining rock outcroppings gives this area an eerie, desolate appearance. As you reach the top of the easternmost part of the ridge the Hudson comes into view along with the communities and industry that line its shore. The view from the ridge proper is virtually unimpeded but several side trails lead to lookouts with breathtaking views of the river.

The trail turns south and then a little west as it completes the loop back to where you started. There is another nice lookout just above Jones Point and there is a white spur trail leading to it. Further along the main trail is a laid stone pylon is present in the area where the donkey engine was to be place for the spiral railway. From this area the trail is almost all graded railroad bed. Large angular stone do not make the best footing and do not cushion a fall. The trail flattens as it approaches the trail junction with the Timp-Torne Trail. Here there are several more good examples of level railroad bed hinting at the work done on the railway. Turn left at the junction and retrace your steps back down the trail to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Elk Pen to Little Dam LakeTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.8 mi. 2093 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Take the exit for Route 17 south to Harriman off Route 17. This is the last exit before the tolls heading east or the first exit after the tolls heading west. Drive south toward Tuxedo for about 4 miles and turn left on Arden Valley Road. There will be a sign for Harriman State Park on Route 17. Drive across the bridge over Interstate 87 and park in the parking area on the right.

Start your hike by exiting the parking area to the west and hiking a short trail to Arden Valley Road. Turn left on the road and hike back out to Route 17. Cross the road and watch for the white blazes of the At slightly to the right. Enter the woods and hike a short distance to a set of steps on the hillside. A sign indicates various destinations along the AT and their distances. Your objective is Little Dam Lake about 2.8 mile ahead. What the sign does not say is that you will be hiking up and down hills for most of the trip. The first climb is called Agony Grind and, depending on your level of fitness, may live up to its name. The trail ascends over 500 feet in about.35 making the average grade around 26%. The ground levels a little at the top before descending slightly and then climbing up to the top of another hill which is higher than the first. You will pass through some dwarf pines at about 1.25 miles. Continue your journey by descending from the top of the hill and then climbing another. At 1.8 miles you will be at the top of a hill and ready to descend to cross the Orange Turnpike. Descend to the road and turn left to pick up the AT about 200 feet south. Upon entering the woods you will be confronted by another hill. Just before the ascent you may find a cooler with jugs of water by the side of the trail. A "trail angel" named John leaves apples and bananas and other snacks as well as the water. Climb to the top of the last hill before the lake and you may find a shelter constructed by John. Hiked down the hill and follow the AT along the northern shore of Little Dam Lake and then southwest along the western shore> You will find that the trail crosses a stream using some large boulders as stepping stones. A bridge once stood here but was damaged in a storm. Once you have reached the stones you may continue across and hike many hike toward Fitzgerald Falls, the Wildcat Shelter and Mount Peter. Turn around and retrace your steps back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly counterclockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Lake Massawippa to Route 32Trails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 13.5 mi. 1430 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take I86, the Quickway, to the exit just before the Harriman toll plaza and get on Route 6 East. Drive 3.8 miles to the parking area on the left just before Lake Massawippa. You may also take Route 6 West from the Bear Mountain traffic circle and the parking area will be on the right just after the lake. Walk out to Route 6, carefully cross the road and walk for a half mile on the shoulder of Route 6. Just passed the intersections with Route 293 cross the road and walk into the woods. Watch for a trail and the aqua blazes of the Long Path. Turn left and follow the trail as it parallels Route 6. At .8 miles the trail comes out of the woods to the shoulder of Route 6 and at about 1 mile it turns right and begins a long downhill section at the point where the guardrail begins. Walk downhill on a track or path and pass through a gate in a fence. Almost immediately you will be on an old, abandoned road heading north. You may get views of the Woodbury Commons shopping center and Monroe-Woodbury High School. This road starts as Old Route 6 and then is marked as Estrada Road. At about 1.7 miles there is a chain across the road and a turnaround. Some descriptions give this as a parking area but there are several "official" signs that said "No Parking"! Walk down Estrada Road following the aqua blazes. At 2.6 miles at the bottom of the hill and just before crossing the Thruway, turn right on Abrams Road which runs parallel to the Thruway. Traffic here is usually minimal and the shoulder is wide enough to walk on. At 3.3 miles turn right onto Smith Clove Road and walk about .6 miles northeast. This road has almost no shoulder at the beginning and traffic can be heavy. Watch for some very expensive houses and a large, well-maintained golf club. At 3.9 miles turn left on Pine Hill Road and walk .7 miles until you cross over the Thruway. Continue to descend Pine Hill Road passing through an underpass under the Metro North tracks. At 4.9 miles the road turns left but you should continue straight ahead onto a woods road. The woods road is wide and open and acts as a right-of-way for a gas pipeline. The road travels along Woodbury Creek and the trip is pretty. Except for the traffic noise from the Thruway the setting could be mistaken for anyplace in the Catskills. The road swings to the northeast and then back north for about 1.5 miles. It is very flat. At 6.45 miles walk under a railroad trestle and near Woodbury Creek. Just after walking under the trestle, turn right heading east and walk up a steep bank to a fence. Walk around the end of the fence and turn left. Walk along it for about .1 miles when the trail will bring you out to the berm that runs along the shoulder of the Thruway. Walk north along the berm for a hundred feet and then turned left into the woods. Follow the aqua blazes over a fence and down a steep bank to Route 32. At the road turn left, walk across a bridge over the creek and stop just short of the trestle. Look across the road at a drive way and find a "Long Path" sign and aqua blazes on the other side. This is your turnaround point since the next section starts here. To get back to the car, turn around and retrace your route.



(The map on the right shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Lake Sebago to Cascade of SlidTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.1 mi. 1310 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. Pass through the Kanawauke Circle and continue southwest on Seven Lakes Drive until the parking area for the Lake Sebago boat launch on the right. Walk out the driveway to Seven Lakes Drive and cross to the other side. The start of the Seven Hills Trail is marked by three blue on white blazes. The trail ascends Conklin Mountain for about .75 miles before turning right or southeast. Look to the left at this turn to see a high rock cliff with a boulder perched on top. This is Monitor Rock and is worth the short climb on the path to the left. After returning from Monitor Rock, continue up the woods road before making the turn on the trail. Watch for another path to the left and follow it to another set of boulders and a red brick "structure". Return to the woods road, turn right and go back to the area where the Seven Hills trail turns southwest. Make the turn and start to walk along the Diamond Mountain ridge.

After about .5 miles there is a nice lookout over Lake Sebago. Continue on the trail passing a large boulder called the "cracked diamond". The trail flattens as it passes over some exposed rock and starts to descend. The views here are not spectacular and include mostly featureless forest. After passing the area where the HST Trail follows the Seven Hills trail, the trail begins to descend and the descent is STEEP in several different places. The trail descends to a stream. Turn left and follow the blue blazes to the bridge across the stream. The trail soon bears to the right. Follow the white blazes of the Kakiat Trail to the left. Within .25 miles the black blazes of the Raccoon Brook Hills trail turns off to the left. Follow this trail down to the brook and cross it. At the base of the rock ledges and cliffs are several rock shelters once used by Native Americans. Numerous artifacts were recovered from these shelters and placed in the Harriman Museum. Retrace your path to the area of the bridge over the stream.

Follow the red blazes of the Pine Meadow Trail for about .25 miles until it meets the orange blazed HST Trail. Turn right on this trail and cross the bridge. Below the bridge is a cascade of water over several different drops called the Cascade of Slid. Follow the white blazes of the Kakiat Trail until it meets the yellow blazed Stony Brook Trail just before another bridge. The Stony Brook Trail parallels Stony Brook and is a nice, relatively flat walk beside a stream. This trail continue for a little over a mile until it meets the HST and then the Tuxedo-Mt. Ivy Trail. In about .3 miles you will be at the base of the Lake Sebago dam. Walk the .75 miles back to the parking area on the Seven Lakes Drive.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Lake Skanatati to Pine Swamp MountainTrails IndexTop of page

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.6 mi. 980 ft. GPSies

link to topo map

Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. Just passed Lake Tiorati there are two lakes, one on each side of the road. These are Lakes Askoti and Skanatati. Pull into the parking area on the right next to Lake Skanatati. This lake is larger than it looks as you will see when you hike along the shore and see it from above. The trails start to the right of the lake. Bear to the left on the Long Path marked with aqua paint. As you walk along this path there are several opportunities to walk down to the lake to get a better view. After following the shoreline of the lake the Long Path continues west and then turns north. At 1.1 miles the Long Path meets the yellow marked Dunning Trail.

Continue north on the Long Path for about .2 miles. The trail ascends gently passed some really impressive rock formations and a cold mountain stream. Continue up the trail until you see a pair of glacial erratics on a hill above you. There was extensive mining in this area and you may see the opening of mine adits, mine pits and equipment. Turn around and hike back to the junction with the Dunning Trail. Turn right and follow the Dunning Trail west .15 miles. In this area there are extensive tailings from the Hogencamp Iron Mines. There are also open pits and at least one adit. The trail continues south and then west for .45 miles before turning abruptly north. In this area, there is a nice lookout over Little Long Pond. This is a good place to stop for a rest before continuing north.

Take the Dunning Trail north as it ascends about .3 miles to the Bowling Rocks. Here there is a long narrow open rock face with several medium sized boulders. All that is needed are some "pins". Continue walking another .35 miles to the Bald Rocks and the junction with the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. The Bald Rocks can be accessed from an unmarked trail just before the RD junction or turn left on the RD and walk up a slight incline to the Bald Rocks. At the trail junction turn right on the red marked RD Trail. This trail has many open rock faces some of which are flat but MANY of which are tilted. These areas can be slippery when wet, cold when windy and IMPOSSIBLE when icy. The trail descends into a swale with a small stream. There is a log bridge here. On the other side the trail ascends up a short rock scramble and then up an open rock face. The RD Trail goes up and over the top. At the top look down to you left to see a small pond often frequented by wildlife. Continue for several hundred feet on the RD Trail. Look straight ahead to see a large glacial erratic that looks a little like the prow of a ship. Return to the top of the rock outcrop and turn right. Watch for the blue L on a white background that marks the Lichen trail. The total distance from the Dunning-RD junction is about .35 miles.

The Lichen Trail runs to an elevated rock plateau and continues straight ahead off the plateau and down to the left. After wrapping around a rock outcrop to the right the trail ascends over...an open rock face. From this point is a nice lookout over Island Pond. The trail continues .35 miles along open rock and descends steeply down to the Arden-Surebridge Trail which is marked with red triangles. Turn right on the ASB Trail and continue over relatively flat but often wet ground for .45 miles to Times Square. This is a junction of four trails and a woods road. The trails are well marked but make sure you continue ahead and slightly to the right on the ASB Trail. This trail has its ups and downs as it continues .45 miles to the junction with the Dunning Trail. Pick your way across a stream that eventually empties into Pine Swamp and stay on the ASB Trail. South on the Dunning Trail are the remains of the Pine Swamp Iron Mine. This mine has an adit that can be entered in drier weather and a large stope.

The ASB Trail continues east for .5 miles and then turns directly south and starts to climb Pine Swamp Mountain. In .2 miles you will be at the top of the mountain. The climb is not difficult and proceeds along a wide woods road. From the top of Pine Swamp Mountain are several nice lookouts over the surrounding lakes. Directly south is lake Skanatati and just beyond the two part of Lake Kanawauke. Around to the left Lake Askoti is partly visible with Little Long Pond on the extreme right. After taking some time to enjoy the view and take pictures, get back on the trail and descend to the parking lot .35 miles away. This descent is steep in spots with one short rock scramble.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Lake Skanatati to St. John's RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 3.5 mi. 555 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. Just passed Lake Tiorati there are two lakes, one on each side of the road. These are Lakes Askoti and Skannatati. Pull into the parking area on the right next to Lake Skannatati. Walk out the far end of the parking area following the aqua blazes. Walk up to the road, hop the guard rail and cross to the other side. Follow the blazes onto a gravel and cinder road until they veer to the right. The trail leads to a woods road and stays on it for a short distance before the leaving the road and starting a gentle climb. Crossed a right-of-way with a telephone cable and three stands of open wire. At .4 miles you will hit the top of the hill and then drop to Route 106 at .5 miles. Turn right on the road and walk a few hundred feet to the Long Path blazes on the left. The trail crosses a marshy area on some thin slats nailed to some thin rails. Head south toward Lake Welch Drive and St. John's Road as the trail gains about 175 feet from 1 mile to 1.4 miles. Along the way there is a small foundation on the right side of the trail. The trail travels over a flat area and then begins the descent from the little ridge to Lake Welch Drive. With the road in sight watch for a woods road which is lined on either side by large boulders. Walk out to Lake Welch Drive, cross the road and find the Long Path blazes on the right side of St. John's Road. Walk along the trail for a few feet and then turned around and retrace your route to the car. Further down St. John's road is the St. John's in the Wilderness Church is a beautiful, old church with a rich history. Each year the church holds a special Palm Sunday service for hikers. I have never been inside but hope to attend services there this next year. The architecture from the outside is worth a visit.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Lake Tiorati to Brien ShelterTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 8.2 mi. 1650 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. At the Tiorati Circle turn right on Arden Valley Road and park in the parking area on the left. Find the blue blazed Tiorati Trail that leaves the parking area heading west and roughly parallelling Arden Valley Road. After about .3 miles, the blue trail ends at the AT and Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Turn right and follow the trail blazes. The trail undulates a bit but then descends and at about 1 mile the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail heads off to the right. Stay on the AT and head northeast along the shoulder of Stockbridge Mountain ridge. At 1.75 miles you will begin to drop about 300 feet until you crossed Seven Lakes Drive at 2.5 miles. From the road the trail continues on a woods road but the AT markings are very faded compared to the bright white on the western side. After a short distance on the woods road, the trail cuts into the woods heading south then southeast. At 3.5 miles you regain the 300 feet you dropped on the other side of the road. At 3.7 miles the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail turns right as you continue on the AT following the white blazes to the left. The trail gains a little elevation and then begins to drop. The William Brien Shelter will appear at 4.4 miles. You are now ready to return so turn around and retrace your path back to the junction with the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail at 5.2 miles. Head left to use this trail to return. The trail meanders up and down and generally heads WSW. At 6.1 miles it heads north and then east before crossing Seven Lakes Drive at 6.8 miles. At 7.2 miles you will meet the AT again. Turn left heading west toward Arden Valley Road. The .75 miles back to the road is all uphill but it is not steep. Cross the road and turn left shortly after to take the Tiorati Trail back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Lake Tiorati to Hippo RockTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.9 mi. 1040 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. At the Tiorati Circle turn right on Arden Valley Road and park in the parking area on the left. Walk up to the Arden Valley Road and head west and north on the road. Walk up and down the hill, to find the Long Path at the point where the road makes a sharp left. The aqua blazes are clear on both the rocks and trees. Turn right onto a wide woods road and walk passed a gate heading north and then north northeast. At 1 mile the trail turns to the north again and rises over the top of a ridge and descends down the other side. The forest is all hardwoods and very open. As you come down off the first, small ridge you enter the area between two ridges. It is very rocky as is typical of Harriman. Begin to climb up the Stockbridge Ridge to Stockbridge Mountain. The climb looks steep on the profile but is only about a 10% grade. At the top of the mountain is a flat, open area with a limited view. Descend from Southbridge Mountain still heading north and continue north along the trail as it rolls some. Hippo Rock is a large and precariously balanced glacial erratic on the left side of the trail. As you descend a hill at 2.5 miles the rock will be directly ahead and is unmistakable. When you are done at the rock, turn around and retrace your route back to the car.



(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Lake Tiorati to Lemon SqueezerTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.1 mi. 1700 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. At the Tiorati Circle turn right on Arden Valley Road and park in the parking area on the left. Find the blue blazed Tiorati Trail that leaves the parking area heading west and roughly parallelling Arden Valley Road. After about .3 miles, the blue trail ends at the AT and Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Turn left and follow the trail blazes. Almost immediately you will pass by a new steel water storage tank on the right and the old cement and wooden cistern on the left. The trail begins to climb to the top of the Fingerboard Mountain Ridge. The trail generally ascends and you will hit 1375 feet at the highest point which is a little more than 400 feet higher than the parking area. You can see Lake Tiorati below if there are no leaves on the trees but there is never a good enough vantage point to take pictures. The trail surface is typical for Harriman with areas of open rock faces alternating with jumbles of rocks and a few clear areas between! Watch for the numerous glacial erratics that litter the park. There ware three small but interesting "pink" boulders in one area which may be "pinks schist". At 1.3 miles you will be at the highest point of the ridge you will then drop almost all the elevation you gained as you hike downhill to Surebridge Brook. Do not cross the brook here but turn left to follow the AT along the brook. Watch for the tailings piles from the Greenwood Mine. The Harriman area is full of iron mines that date back as far as the period of the American Revolution. Some are just small pits while others like the Greenwood Mine are much bigger. Most of the Greenwood Mine is now underwater but the main adit and the tailings are visible along the trail. There is another large adit up on the hillside. Continue on the AT until it crosses the brook at 2.2 miles. Ascend a small hill and then walk back down the other side to the junction with the Long Path at 3 miles. Continue on the AT and begin the steepest climb of the day to the top of Island Pond Mountain. As you descend the other side watch for a nice lookout off to the right that has a beautiful view of Island Pond. Walk back to the trail and down the other side of the mountain to the area of the Lemon Squeezer. The Lemon Squeezer on the AT in Harriman is one of at least four that I know of and each is different and interesting in its own right. You will come to a point on the AT where there is a sheer drop of at least 10 feet with only a few handholds. You may try this descent or opt for the easy way which is marked by a sign that says ... "Easy Way"! Work your way back over to the Squeezer which is a narrow slot that you have to walk through. Walk back through the Squeezer and return to the junction with the Long Path. You will have to climb up and over Island Pond Mountain again. At 4.5 miles turn left or northeast on the Long Path. For the next 2.1 miles you will struggle over some very rocky terrain. Along the way you will hike up and down at least three hills. Nothing is very steep or very high but the constant hike over the rocks begins to become uncomfortable. Finally at 6.6 miles you will hit the Arden Valley Road. Turn right and walk on the flat, hard surface up a hill. Simply stay on the road and walk back to the car at the Lake Tiorati Circle parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Long Path to 1779 Trail LoopTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 10.9 mi. 2170 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take I86, the Quickway, to the exit just before the Harriman toll plaza and get on Route 6 East. Drive a little more than 4 miles to the parking area on the left where the Long Path crosses the road. You may also take Route 6 West from the Bear Mountain traffic circle for less than a mile. In this case the parking area is on the right. From here the Long Path heads northeast toward Long Mountain and passes the Torrey Memorial on the way. Walk out the exit for the parking area and across the road since this hike heads in the opposite direction. The Long Path crosses almost directly across from the exit to the parking area. The trail follows wide woods roads in many places. Be careful as you hike since there are many fire roads and other paths that crisscross the trails and it is easy to get lost even with a map. The Long path heads almost directly southwest and climbs around 400 feet in the first 1.8 miles. Just before another climb there is a series of rock overhangs which are labeled "cave shelter" on the NYNJTC maps. Climb to the top of the rise and walk along a flat part of the trail to a rock shelter at 2.0 miles. The shelter faces west and the map marks it as a viewpoint. Like so many of the places that were once viewpoints the trees have grown to block most of the view. Descend to the junction with the yellow Menomine Trail but continue straight ahead to Hippo Rock at 2.3 miles into the hike. This rock really does look like a hippo from the front. Head back to the trail junction and turn right on the yellow Menomine Trail heading generally southeast. The trail is a long descent along a woods road and soon you will pass Lake Nawahunta. At 3.6 miles cross Seven Lakes Drive and head toward Silvermine Lake. Walk the trail along the west shore of the lake. Over the next .6 miles the trail gains 320 feet to the site of the Brien Memorial Shelter. The shelter is about 5.3 miles into the hike. Turn left onto the Appalachian Trail and starting up a short, steep rock climb. This trail is marked in white for the AT but also has red blazes as it is part of the Ramapo Dunderberg Trail. After reaching the top of the rock scramble, the trail flattens some with a few ups and downs. For about .9 miles from the shelter the trail rolls up and down slightly until at 7.2 miles it turns to the right. Now you are hiking southeast rather than northeast and starting up Black Mountain. After a short but steep climb there is a viewpoint over Silvermine Lake. Continue on to the summit at 7.7 miles into the hike. The views here include the New York City skyline. From the summit start down a very steep descent of almost 400 feet in .35 miles. A little further on turn left and head almost due north on the blue 1779 Trail. The trail parallels the Palisades Parkway which is just over a ridge to the right. There are no views but the 1.6 miles to Seven Lakes drive near the Long Mountain traffic circle is pleasant enough. At the traffic circle cross the road and head directly into the woods. DO NOT walk further up the road as the trail there is not marked and it will take you out of the way. Find a marker on a tree and then look ahead across the construction yard for another on a pole! Walk to the back left corner of the yard a find the trail and the markers. Enter the woods to continue the hike. The trail heads north toward the Popolopen Gorge Trail and Turkey Hill Lake just skirting a climb up Summer Hill. After about .6 miles, you may walk straight ahead on Summer Hill Road rather than take the circuitous route on the trail. If you want to stay on the trail, turn to the right. Be sure to turn left at the next trail junction! Just before you cross a small stream look for the trail on the left. It may be hard to spot since it is marked for an approach from the opposite direction. Stay on the trail and you will soon be at the dam for the lake. Continue around the west shore of the lake which has several spots to stop and take pictures. From the dam it is all uphill for the next .9 miles until you hit the Long Path again at 12.2 miles. Turn left on the Long Path and hike the .3 miles back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: ORAK Ruins from St. John's ChurchTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.7 mi. 1295 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. Pass through the Kanawauke Circle and continue southwest on Seven Lakes Drive until the sign for Lake Sebago Beach. Stay to the left and turn left to go toward Lake Welch Drive. Turn onto Lake Welch Drive and watch for St. John's Road, the first road on the right. Turn here and drive until you see St. John in the Wilderness Church on the left. Park in the parking lot. Walk back down the road for .3 miles toward Lake Welch Drive. At the end of the road just before Lake Welch Drive turn right off the road and begin to follow the aqua blazes of the Long Path. The trail alternates between trail and wider woods road in many places. It also makes several twists and turns and rolls over hills and at least one mountain. At .45 miles the trail bends sharply to the left and at .65 it turns onto a woods road to the right. The road also continues to the left and is a shortcut back to the church. After climbing a bit, you now descend to cross Beaver Pond Brook in a swampy area. Along but narrow causeway gets you across this area. Just after the causeway, notice the large grove of red pine which was probably planted in the area. At 1.2 miles the trail again turns to the left and parallels Pine Meadow Road. Stay on the trail as it rises to 1.7 miles and then turns right to cross the wide road. At 1.8 miles the trail tops out at Big Hill and the Big Hill Shelter. The shelter is the typical stone structure with dual fireplaces at the entrance and a pit in front. There is a limited view east to the Hudson. Here the Suffern Bear Mountain Trail comes in from the right and joins the Long Path for a short distance.

The trails now descend a rather steep slop. Watch straight ahead and you will see two large communications towers in the distance on Jackie Jones Mountain. To the left of these towers is a shorter fire tower where you are headed. At about 2.0 miles the Long Path bears right on a woods road. Follow the yellow SBM Trail to the left as it descends slightly and crosses a brook. At 2.15 miles the trail crosses Pine Meadow Road and begins the ascent up Jackie Jones Mountain. This mountain and Rockhouse Mountain are the highest points in Rockland County. At 2.7 miles , at the top of the mountain stands a now closed fire tower. Although the cab is closed, you can climb the tower for the view. Be careful as some of the boards look better than others. Also, if there is any wind at ground level it may be at a somewhat higher velocity near the top of the tower. The tower does offer good views for 360 degrees on the landing just below the cab. Back on the ground continue on the SBM Trail as it begins a descent passed the communications towers on the left. The trail bears to the right and passes over an open rock face. Maps mark this as a viewpoint but the view is limited by trees which have grown. The trail continues to descend and at about 3.0 mikes you will begin to see some stonework and foundations.

This marks the ruins of the ORAK mansion constructed in 1923 by an executive of the company that produced KARO syrup. The mansion was torn down years later but much of the stonework still remains. At first it doesn't look like much but keep walking toward the paved driveway. Bear right to what look like an open clearing. You are standing in what was once the dining room. To the left is a curved stone wall with excellent craftsmanship. The wall has and arched doorway and small, round windows. The owner liked ships and the sea and the dining room was built to resemble a ship. Walk back to and down the driveway. On the right are the foundations of other building. If you continue to walk on the driveway, the gatehouse, which is mostly intact, will be on the left. The trail at this point continues out to Gate hill Road or Route 106. Along the way is another mansion constructed by Rose Renard of Red Rose Tea fame. Turn around and walk back on the driveway. You may want to walk off to the right to see the remains of other outbuildings. When you are finished exploring, follow your route all the way back to the parking area and your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Pine Swamp and Hogencamp MinesTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.1 mi. 850 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. Just passed Lake Tiorati there are two lakes, one on each side of the road. These are Lakes Askoti and Skanatati. Pull into the parking area on the right next to Lake Skanatati. This lake is larger than it looks as you will see when you hike along the shore and see it from above. The trails start to the right of the lake. Bear to the left on the Long Path marked with aqua paint. As you walk along this path there are several opportunities to walk down to the lake to get a better view. After following the shoreline of the lake the Long Path continues west and then turns north. At 1.1 miles the Long Path meets the yellow marked Dunning Trail.

Bear right on the Dunning Trail and walk .5 miles watching for the Pine Swamp on the right and tailings piles on the left. As son as you see the tailing cut up the hill to the left watching for the paths other hikers have used. You should end up in a small area with pine trees. Straight ahead is the cut of the Pine Swamp Mine with walls 20 to 30 feet high. The entrance to the mine is straight ahead. It may be a little wet getting to the adit but the ore vein ran upward in this mine. Walk into the mine and carefully climb upward. Stop to look at the drill marks on the walls. Near the top of the mine is an air shaft. Work your way back down to the entrance and turn right and climb up the hill. Watch for the opening of the air shaft an the hill. At this point you can return to the Dunning Trail and follow it to Times Square. At Times Square take the Long Path over the hill to the Hogencamp Mine. You may also walk cross country and bushwhack from the hill above the Pine Swamp Mine to Hogencamp Mountain.

From the Long Path find a path to the top of Hogencamp Mountain. This is easier than finding the trail to the top. There is a nice view in all directions from the top of Hogencamp Mountain even though its elevation is not particularly great. Work your way back down to the Long Path. As you walk along the Long Path toward the mine keep an eye out for foundations that indicate buildings that were once part of the extensive Hogencamp Mining Complex. Eventually you will be walking along a small stream and between some large boulders on the left and a rock out cropping on the right. Walk past this are and watch for a path that goes down and to the right. This path leads to the most interesting cut of the mine. This cut passes into the rock under the trail you were just hiking. It is filled with water so it is hard to determine the depth. When you are in the cut, turn around and let your eye follow the trenches that parallel the base of the hill.

Walk along the base of the hill and in and out of the trenches. Be sure to walk down to the Dunning Trail to see the tailings piles on the left. You will also see a pit with a large pipe emerging vertically from the pit which is filled with water. Walk back up toward the base of the hill and watch for a deep hole. You may also see some laid stone which may have been part of some foundation. You may return to the Dunning Trail and walk back to the junction with the Long Path where you started the loop. If you have some additional time, climb the hill and walk the ridge above the mine. There are some views of the surrounding countryside and of the mine below. Keep walking and you will intersect the Long Path above the mine where you were before. Walk down the Long Path and to the junction with the Dunning Trail. Stay on the Long Path and retrace your path to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Pingyp MountainTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.1 mi. 920 ft. GPSies

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Take exit 16 off the Palisades Parkway and head west on Lake Welch Drive. When the road splits stay right on Tiorati Brook Road. Drive ,4 miles and park on thesauri shoulder of the road in a large roadside parking area. Start the hike by walking east on the road toward the parkway. The road is narrow with no shoulder and the cars move rather swiftly. The walk is downhill and you will have to walk back up this grade at the end of the hike. Continue on the road until it merges with Lake Welch Drive and then continue until you see the yellow blazes of the Suffern-Bear Mountain Trail coming in from the right at about .8 miles. The blazes are old and not very distinct but they lead to an overpass over the southbound parkway to the northbound lanes. You should see the trail on the other side of the road. Wait until there was a big gap in the traffic before crossing. As soon as you cross the road, the climb starts passing through some rocks. This might be the steepest hike in the park and it was some very narrow ledges and areas that require some rock scrambling. As you ascend the trail take advantage of any views to take pictures since the top of the mountain is wooded. On the climb from the parkway to the first place where the trail levels is .2 miles but the vertical gain is 380 feet for a 35% average grade. There are two more smaller climbs after this but each has a certain "charm". Along the way you will pass by the memorial plaque to Harold Scutt who sited the trail in 1930 and died shortly thereafter in a plane crash. The second climb has an interesting steep slab of rock to negotiate while the third had a crevice to scramble up. The first step up the crevice is huge and requires some upper body strength to make it up. After that, there the trail winds and gains some elevation to the summit of the mountain. Start to descend the north side of the mountain. It is not as steep as the route up but reaches over a 25% grade in places. At 2.1 miles the Suffern-Bear Mountain Trail reaches the base of the mountain and turns right on a woods road marked "Pines" on the map. This can be used to hike a longer loop of about 7 miles using the Red Cross and Beech Trails as well as Tiorati Brook Road. Turn left or west on the road as it heads toward the parkway paralleling a stream. Follow the road which is not blazed but pretty easy to find. You may have to detour several times as the road runs through low areas that are now marshes filled with impressive stands of phragmites. As you near the parkway, the road becomes less distinct and you will have to bushwhack your way through some brush. Depending on which route you take you will most likely have to cross Stillwater Brook. The brook is deep in places but you should be able to find some stepping stones to get you across. Walk south along the northbound lanes and then cross to the wide, wooded median. Walk the median until exit 16 and cross to Lake Welch Drive. Follow Lake Welch Drive and Tiorati Brook Road for .7 miles uphill back to the car.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Ramapo Torne and Russian BearTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 6.8 mi. 1893 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. Pass through the Kanawauke Circle and continue southwest on Seven Lakes Drive until the parking area for the Reeves Brook Visitor's Center appears on the left. Walk to the back right of the parking area and walk briefly through a field on the red marked Pine Meadow Trail. Watch for the blue blazes of the Seven Hills Trail on the left. Continue along this trail as it rises over a hill and then descends to a junction with the orange blazed HST Trail. Turn right here and walk another .2 miles to the base of the Ramapo Torne. Turn left here and start a steep ascent to the first level of the Torne. Watch carefully as you ascend to the first level for the orange blazes that go to the left and start the ascent of the second level of the Torne. This is another steep ascent over some large, scattered boulders. At the top of the second level is one more short ascent to the very top of the Torne. Stop here to take in the views in all directions.

You can return to the trail junction and get on the blue Seven Hills Trail that leads to the HST Trail. The easier route is to continue over the Torne on the orange HST Trail. Stay on this trail as it rolls up and down. Before an obvious descent look straight ahead at the rock outcropping which is the Russian Bear. The trail descends to crosses a small stream and then begins to ascend up the Russian Bear. the trail winds around this tall rock outcropping to a set of stairs on the other side. The ascent is steep but short and the stairs help. Be sure to look back toward the Ramapo Torne for a great view. After taking in the views in all directions, follow the orange trail over the Russian Bear and watch for the black blazes of the Raccoon Brook Hills Trail.

Turn left on the black trail and walk along a steep cliff called the Pulpit. Look DOWN to the area below where you will soon be after a steep descent off the Pulpit. After the descent, look back at the Pulpit. This view makes the reason for the name more obvious. Continue on the black trail passed the white Reeves Brook Trail until it again meets the blue Seven Hills Trail. Turn left on this trail and walk a short distance until the trail starts to descend. Look ahead to the Ramapo Torne. This is Torne View. Retrace your steps to the trail junction but continue straight ahead on the blue trail. As this trail begins to descend it crosses the white Reeves Brook Trail. Turn left here and continue on this trail as it descends back toward the parking area. This trail is hard to follow at times so watch for the blazes on the trees and rocks. The trail follows a stream which has several small cascades along the way. As the trail descends an old woods road it meets the red Pine Meadow Trail. Turn left here and walk back to the parking area.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

link to topo profile (The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Harriman: Route 106 to Elk PenTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 9.3 mi. 1936 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Pass through the Tiorati Circle staying on Seven Lakes Drive. At the Kanawauke Circle take Route 106 west passing between the two parts of Lake Kanawauke. The next body of water on the left is Little Long Pond. Just passed Little Long Pond on a slight upgrade will be a parking area on the right for up to ten cars. There are no trailhead markers but this is the place to park. After parking walk into the woods straight ahead and watch for the red markers of the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail.

Hike through some tress to an area with enormous and impressive rock formation. Hike up and through these formations for about .25 miles until you are on an exposed rock face with a good view of the surrounding terrain and the hills in the distance. Get back on the RD and hike across the rocky spine surrounded by a few trees. After another .25 miles you will be at Black Rock which also gives nice views. As you hike keep looking for the best views since they aren't always at specific named places along the way. In about .8 miles you will be at the Bald Rocks in an open area where many glacial erratics lie on top of strangely marked bedrock. Just after this area the yellow Dunning Trail turns left to Hogencamp Mountain and the Hogencamp Mine. To the left the trail leads to the White Bar Trail and on to the Nubian Trail near Valley of the Boulders.

Continue on the RD passing Hogencamp Mountain on the right. After ascending some open slabs of rock, take in the nice views of the immediate area, the hills and valleys afar and the little pond just below. bear right on the Rd and descend off the ridge for just a short distance. Ahead and slightly to the left will be a large glacial erratic sitting among some trees. Use you imagination to see the prow of a ship sailing into the forest. This is Ship Rock. You can continue on the RD to Times Square and return on the Arden-Surebridge Trail. It may be easier to retrace your steps back to the open rock faces and turn right on the Lichen Trail marked with a blue L on a white background. This trail has some nice viewpoints and is worth the walk. Keep a careful watch for the markers as they may be hard to spot. The Lichen Trail is only about .4 miles long. It passes over a rocky outcrop and then drops around it before rising over more open rock faces. At this point Island Pond can be seen at a distance on the left. At the bottom of a short, steep descent turn left on the red marked Arden-Surebridge Trail which runs concurrently with the aqua blazes of the Long Path.

In .8 miles you will hook up with a section of the white blazed Appalachian Trail just passed the Lemon Squeezer. Before this trail junction are several others that can mislead and confuse. An unmarked trail named the Bottle Cap is the first to appear on the right. Just a few hundred feet later the aqua blazes turn right as the Long Path leaves to the north. In this same area the white blazes of the White Bar Trail appear on the left. Stay on the red trail to an area where you will see some tight passages between the rocks. This is the Lemon Squeezer, The trail does not actually pass through the Lemon Squeezer but feel free to examine this area and walk through the tight "canyons". Just after this the red blazes turn abruptly left as the A-SB Trail turns south. Continue straight ahead on the Appalachian Trail as it works its way passed Island Pond. You will want to get a better view of this little pond but each potential viewpoint is blocked by trees. Stay on the AT as it descends to a flat area just above the pond. Walk to your right to a rock ledge and a beautiful view of this body of water. Return to the AT and cross the outlet of the pond on a small wooden footbridge. Observe the stonework that seems to form a sluice out of the pond.

The AT then ascends form the pond outlet and snakes its way over Green Pond Mountain. The ascent and descent have a few steeper areas but the switchbacks take car of most of these. As you start to descend, you may notice the sounds of traffic. At this point you are headed toward the Elk Pen which is adjacent to the New York State Thruway. After 1.4 miles on the AT and at the bottom of the hill near the Elk Pen turn left on the Arden-Surebridge Trail which runs along the surface of the old Arden Road once called the Harriman Flat Road. In .3 miles the A-SB turns left but you should continue straight ahead on the Stahahe Brook Trail and the Arden Road. After another .3 miles, this trail turns left into the woods just after crossing Stahahe Brook. Stop at the bridge to enjoy the sights and sounds of the brook running under the bridge. Bear right to stay on the Arden Road which now parallels the Thruway for .85 miles. At this point a marker commemorates the road and the builder by stating "showing the advantages of building flat roads in hilly country". Just after this memorial are the white marks of the Nurian Trail which will lead all the way back to the parking area. This trail crosses the Thruway on a raised overpass!

The Nurian Trail now climbs back over the Green pond Mountain Ridge and has a few challenging areas. In .8 miles it crosses Stahahe Brook on a double bridge where the Stahahe Brook Trail enters from the left. Be sure to bear right in this area turning east and southeast on the Nurian Trail. Within .25 miles the trail ascends slightly and then descends into a boulder strewn stream bed. This is the Valley of Boulders and is impressive for the number and variety of large rocks. the trail ascends steeply out of the valley but several switchbacks eliminate all but a few sharp climbs. In one area the trail ascends passed and through some large rock formations. The trail ascends some and joins several woods roads and other trails including the White Bar and Dunning Trails. The Nurian Trail will lead back to the RD just south of Black Rock. You can take the RD back to the parking area by retracing your steps. You may also turn right on the wide Island Pond Road as it come up on your right. After about 1 mile on this road you will be at Route 106. Turn left on the road and walk 1.2 miles back to car. Along the way you will notice a large parking area on the right for the White Bar trail as it turns south. This is the ONLY parking area with any signs or trailhead markers. Several more parking areas or pulloffs will be on the left.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly counterclockwise direction.)

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Harriman: Silvermine Lake to Black MountainTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 5.0 mi. 990 ft. GPSies

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Take Seven Lakes Drive southwest from the Long Mountain Circle near Bear Mountain. Watch for the parking area for Silvermine Lake on the left before the Tiorati Circle. There are ski slopes visible from the road and parking area. Walk out of the parking area toward the lake. The yellow Menomine Trail is to the right and follows the western shore heading south. The trail is reactively flat but very rocky. There are some nice views of the lake and Black Mountain from the trail as it passes along the edge of the lake. At about .9 miles the trail begins to gain some elevation. Continue to climb to the top where the trail levels off briefly and the Brien Shelter. Just passed the shelter look for the white and red dot on white blazes of the Appalachian and Ramapo-Dunderberg Trails on the left starting near a big tree. Turn left and follow the trails up a short but steep rock scramble. In the .7 miles from the start of the climb passed the shelter the elevation gain is 400 feet. The trails head ENE and drop and the climb again. At 1.9 miles begin a descent of 250 feet over .4 miles to the Silvermine Ski Road. Cross the ski road to begin the climb up Black Mountain. The climb starts off steeply and then alternates between flatter sections and steeper ones with a rock scramble right at the top. At about 2.4 miles there is a nice viewpoint that overlooks Silvermine Lake. Continue up the trail to the short rock scrambled to the top of Black Mountain. To the right watch for a faint path that leads down to a mine that was cut into the face of the cliffs. Once at the top take in the views of the Hudson River to the east. If you walk around a little following some of the paths at the top, you may find several depressions that were dug to mine iron. The mines must not have been very productive as there are almost no tailings. Head back down the trails the way you came being careful on the steeper sections. When you are back at the Silvermine Ski Road, turn right and follow it as it winds its way down to the shore of the lake. The road is interesting and obviously well-constructed. It dates back to when the entire park belonged to the Harriman family. Follow the road as it descended toward the lake and then parallels it until the outlet of the lake. The road then turns from north to northeast and follows the brook until crossing it on a bridge. Continue to follow the ski road until it intersects Seven Lakes Drive. Turn left and walked the road .6 miles back to the car.



(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly counterclockwise direction.)

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Harriman: Torrey MemorialTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficulty 1.2 mi. 360 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take I86, the Quickway, to the exit just before the Harriman toll plaza and get on Route 6 East. Drive a little more than 4 miles to the parking area on the left where the Long Path crosses the road. You may also take Route 6 West from the Bear Mountain traffic circle for less than a mile. In this case the parking area is on the right. From here the Long Path heads northeast toward Long Mountain and passes the Torrey Memorial on the way. Raymond Torrey was a founding member of the new York New Jersey Trail Conference and instrumental in the creation of the Long Path. The first part of the trail descends and crosses the Popolopen Torne Trail. Stay on the Long Path and start a short ascent up a hill. The trail flattens out at the top and the memorial is a message carved into the exposed bedrock at the top of the ridge. The views are good and you see the Perkins Tower on Bear Mountain. Turkey Hill Lake lies below with its rocky but secluded shores. This hike definitely has a lot to offer for very little effort.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

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Harriman: Turkey Hill to Route 6Trails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 7.2 mi. 1887 ft. GPSies

link to topo map Take I86, the Quickway, to the exit just before the Harriman toll plaza and get on Route 6 East. Drive a little more than 4 miles to the parking area on the left where the Long Path crosses the road. You may also take Route 6 West from the Bear Mountain traffic circle for less than a mile. In this case the parking area is on the right. From here the Long Path heads northeast toward Long Mountain and passes the Torrey Memorial on the way. Raymond Torrey was a founding member of the new York New Jersey Trail Conference and instrumental in the creation of the Long Path. The first part of the trail descends and crosses the Popoloppen Torne Trail. Stay on the Long Path and start a short ascent up a hill. The trail flattens out at the top at around .7 miles is the memorial with a message carved into the exposed bedrock. The views are good and you see the Perkins Tower on Bear Mountain. Turkey Hill Lake lies below with its rocky but secluded shores. Continue following the aqua blazes and over the next half mile drop 420 feet as the trail descends the steep side of the ridge. Several switchbacks moderate the grade but it still averages 15%. When a layer of damp leaves covers the slippery rocks a quick descent is impossible. At about a mile the well-worn track seems to go straight ahead but the trail turns to the right. Near the bottom of the descent cross a stream by hopping from rock to rock which is easy when the water level is low. There is a "bridge" present but it has seen better days. The construction consisted of two logs that were cut on site to span the stream. The "decking" is made of branches lashed to the logs with very old rope. At 1.25 miles the trail turns to the left and starts to travel due west on what looks like a right-of-way or woods road. On the right are signs indicating that the land is part of the West Point Military Reservation. Start an ascent of 470 feet over .66 miles to the top of Howell Mountain. Near the top of the ascent is a rock outcropping where large cubical blocks of rocks have split off. As you begin to descend the 430 feet from Howell Mountain you can see the next ridge. The descent has a few switchbacks to help where the slope is the steepest. At the bottom of the descent cross the outlet stream to Lake Massawippa on large stepping stones placed by a trail crew. The Brooks Mountain ridge lies ahead and hiking directly up the ridge would have mean gaining over 200 feet in about 400 feet! Fortunately the trail turns north to ascend on a shallower slope and then turns southwest in a major switchback at about 2.8 miles. The trail picks up a woods road that gently ascends the ridge to the summit at 1080 feet. There are only limited views from the top. Descend off the ridge heading southwest until at 3.6 miles you come to Route 293. Along the way the trail shifts direction turning to the northwest. Walk up to the road passing a culvert that directs Popolopen Creek under the pavement. Cross the road and face another ascent up the Blackcap Mountain ridge. Blackcap Mountain has a maximum elevation of 1381 feet but the trail turns southwest at less than 1200 feet. Continued to walk through hardwood forest and begin the climb up the ridge. At 4 miles and about 1180 feet the trail turns 90 degrees and heads southwest again along the base of the ridge. For about a mile the trail is straight as an arrow heading southwest toward Route 6. There are some ups and downs in the trail but nothing compared to the ridges you have already crossed. The trail does not actually intersect Route 6 but as you near the road it is easy to walk out to the pavement. Cross Route 6 and eventually Route 293 as well. The traffic can be very heavy but the shoulders are wide. At 5.6 miles Route 6 passes between Lake Massawippa and Lake Te-Ata. Continue on Route 6 back to the parking area on the left.

(The map on the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

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Hartley Road to Mountain RoadTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 14.8 mi. 1360 ft. GPSies

link to topo map This route is a one way hike from east to west. This requires a you to spot a car at the end or get a ride. The 29.6 mile roundtrip would be difficult! Take exit 113 off State Route 17 to get on Route 209 south toward Port Jervis. Drive to the Guymard Turnpike and turn left to follow the winding road over the ridge to Mountain Road. Turn right on Mountain Road and drive 3 miles south to the trailhead on the right. Park slightly south of the beginning of the trail as there is a pullout that can accommodate three or four cars. Drop a car here. Drive to Hartley Road just west of Goshen. The easiest way to do this may be to drive south on Mountain Road to I84 and then take I84 to Middletown. From Middletown take Route 17 east to the Fletcher Street exit, exit 126. Turn right and right again onto Cheechunk Road. Drive about 1.7 miles west to Hartley Road. Turn left to the Heritage Trail pulloff only a few hundred feet in on the right. Start by hiking north on Hartley Road to Echo Lake Road. Turn left on Echo Lake Road and head west. After a short distance, cross over the Walkill River and pass Echo Lake at .75 miles. At 1.2 miles continue turn left slightly onto CR 50 heading west. Pass by the Wawayanda Inn and at 2 miles crossed Route 6. From this point on the road rolls some but overall gains elevation most of the time. After Route 6, cross Denton Hill Road and stay right on Ridgebury Road. The walk on Ridgebury Road is close to 3 miles to the intersection with Ridgebury Hill Road. Turn right at just over 5 miles and watch for the left turn onto Wilcox Road. Wilcox Road is only about .2 miles long and then the trail is back on Ridgebury Hill Road. Despite the fact that this is a road walk the blazes are there and pretty easy to spot. Continue north on Ridgebury Hill Road until it meets Route 6 where you turn right. Walk north on Route 6 for about .25 miles before turning left on McBride Road. At the end of McBride Road turn left on CR 49 and then almost immediately right on R. Hunter Road. Within a short distance R. Hunter Road becomes Mount Orange Road. The further west you hike the more rural the area becomes and the more elevation you gain. After about a mile Mount Orange Road turns sharply right and crosses over I84. Continue north and then west on Mount Orange Road until about 9.4 miles where the trail turns left onto Remey Road. The walk on Remey Road is short as it soon meets South Centerville Road that heads south and west to 10.1 miles. Continue straight ahead on Mullock Road which begins a nice climb ! Houses get farther apart and there are fewer cars. Mullock Road seems to go on forever as it gains elevation heading west toward Mountain Road. It crosses several roads on the way and passes an old cemetery. At 13.9 miles turn left onto Mountain Road for the final .9 miles back to the car.



(The map on the right shows the parking area and the one-way hiking route.)

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Heberly Run: Waterfall BushwhackTrails IndexTop of page

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Trail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficultyTrail difficulty 4.6 mi 688 ft GPSies

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From Route 118 turn north onto Central Road. In Center take a right onto Jamison City Road. in Jameson City continue straight ahead on T720 to Sate Game Lands #13. Park in the parking area at the end of the road where you can go no further. This hike is a bushwhack up Herberly Run to three different waterfalls. The waterfalls are more interesting after a heavy rain but this makes them harder to access.

To begin the hike walk over to the stream and start walk along the far bank or in the stream bed itself. Keep working upstream for about a mile when you will be in the area of Big Falls. Since you are probably below the falls at this point, you will have to work your way up a steep embankment to continue the hike. A path exists on the left bank looking upstream but it is slippery even when not very wet. Continue to walk up the left bank until around 1.9 miles when Twin Falls will appear. This falls is smaller than Big Falls but is pretty in its own right. Once you are done inspecting these falls try climbing out of the gorge on the right bank. This will take you to the upper drop of Twin Falls where you may be able to walk or wade across to the right bank and access the path along the left bank above the falls. At around 2.65 miles Lewis Falls should come into view. The gorge at Lewis Falls is deeper than at the other two falls and the banks are impossible to scale. Walk back downstream until you can work your way out of the gorge preferably on the right side. From here you can walk to the top of Lewis Falls. There is a path that follows Herberly Run and then Shanty Run until it cuts across the plateau and comes back down. The path is indistinct and not well marked! Cross the stream above Lewis Falls and walk out to Grassy Hollow Road. This is a grass and dirt road that the Game Commission opens during hunting season. It makes the walk back to the car fairly easy. Along the way you can hear Heberly Run and catch glimpses of the water.

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

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Heritage TrailTrails IndexTop of page

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
Trail difficultyTrail difficulty 11.6 mi. 360 ft. GPSies

link to topo map This route is a one way hike from east to west. This requires a you to spot a car at the end or get a ride. The 23.2 mile roundtrip would be difficult.Take the Fletcher Street exit, exit 126, off Route 17 heading east. Turn right and right again onto Cheechunk Road. Drive about 1.7 miles west to Hartley Road. Turn left and park at the Heritage Trail pulloff only a few hundred feet in on the right. Drop a car here. Drive back out to Route 17 and take exit 129. Park in the Heritage Trail parking lot on the right before the large commuter lots on the left. The trail starting in Monroe is a hard paved surface which makes walking it very easy. Throughout the walk you will meet other people who are walking and running some with their dogs. You will also meet people on bicycles. Everyone seems very respectful of the other people using the trail and many use it several times a week. Within .7